ElizainEngland's Personal Name List

ALBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-ban(German) AL-BAHN(French) AL-bən(English) AWL-bən(English)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: Quite like (as nickname for Albion)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Anglicized masculine form of AILBHE.
ALWILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Personal note: Fun
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of ALFHILD. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.
ALYSSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
ANNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ARETHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-REE-thə
Personal note: Kinda Like
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Possibly derived from Greek αρετη (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-).
ARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Арина(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Russian variant of IRINA.
ARISTIDES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Spanish, Portuguese
Other Scripts: Αριστειδης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-rees-TEE-dehs(Classical Latin) ar-is-TIE-deez(English) a-ree-STEE-dhehs(Spanish) ə-reesh-TEE-dəsh(European Portuguese) ə-reesh-CHEE-jəsh(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the Greek name Αριστειδης (Aristeides), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 5th-century BC Athenian statesman Aristides the Just, who was renowned for his integrity. It was also the name of a 2nd-century saint.
ARKADIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρκαδιος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From an ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia". Arcadia was a region in Greece, its name deriving from αρκτος (arktos) "bear". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr.
ASH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH
Personal note: as nickname for Ashwin
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 69% based on 9 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
AYELET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיֶלֶת(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
BALDWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: BAWLD-win(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and win "friend". In the Middle Ages this was a popular name in Flanders and among the Normans, who brought it to Britain. It was borne by one of the leaders of the First Crusade, an 11th-century nobleman from Flanders. After the crusaders conquered Jerusalem, he was crowned as the king of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
BENESH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: בענעש(Yiddish)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Yiddish form of BENEDICT.
BRANNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-ən
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname derived from Mac Branain, which means "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BRANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wehn(Welsh)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BREESHEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Manx
Pronounced: BREE-shə
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Manx form of BRIDGET.
BRITTANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of BRITANNIA.
CAELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: Kaelia
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of CAELIUS.
CAELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Roman family name that was derived from Latin caelum meaning "heaven".
CAILEAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KA-lehn
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CAMBRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: KAM-bree-ə(English)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.
CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CERISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SU-REEZ
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "cherry" in French.
CHARITON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χαριτων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
CLARINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-RIN-də
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix inda. It was first used by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
COLUMBA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ko-LOOM-ba(Late Latin) kə-LUM-bə(English)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
CONALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CORETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kaw-REHT-ə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of CORA. It was borne by Coretta Scott King (1927-2006), the wife of Martin Luther King.
CUTHBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KUTH-bərt
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
DAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Latvian
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "song" in Lithuanian and Latvian.
DANICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даница(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DA-nee-tsa(Serbian, Croatian) DA-nyee-tsa(Slovak) DAN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DARA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Irish Mac Dara, which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DELPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-fee-ə
Personal note: Like
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Possibly from the name of the Greek city of Delphi, the site of an oracle of Apollo, which is possibly related to Greek δελφυς (delphys) "womb". It was used in the play 'The Prophetess' (1647), in which it belongs to the title prophetess.
DELYTH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Personal note: Like
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From an elaboration of the Welsh element del "pretty".
DONOVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə-vən(English)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".
DOUGLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUG-ləs
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). Douglas was originally a place name (for example, a tributary of the River Clyde), which then became a Scottish clan name borne by a powerful line of earls. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
DOYLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see DOUGAL). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
DROGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Norman name, possibly derived from Gothic dragen "to carry" or Saxon drog "ghost". Alternatively, it could be from the Slavic element dragu "precious, dear". The Normans introduced this name to England.
EDWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
ELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Елена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic) Ελενα(Greek)
Pronounced: EH-leh-na(Italian, German) eh-LEH-na(Spanish) yi-LYEH-nə(Russian) i-LYEH-nə(Russian) EHL-ə-nə(English) ə-LAY-nə(English)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 78% based on 5 votes
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELOY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-LOI
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of ELIGIUS.
ELWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-win
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Variant of ALVIN.
EMMERICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: EH-mə-rikh(German)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning "power". The first element may be ermen "whole, universal" (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal "work, labour" (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim "home" (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.
EPIPHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: i-PIF-ə-nee
Personal note: Fun
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) that commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
ERNEST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: UR-nist(English) EHR-NEST(French) EHR-nest(Polish)
Personal note: Kinda Like
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).
ERWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: EHR-veen(German) EHR-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
EVREN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Personal note: like
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish. In Turkic mythology the Evren is a gigantic snake-like dragon.
FLORENTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Original feminine form of FLORENCE.
FLORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, French
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-ryan(Polish) FLAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FLORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Florianus (see FLORIAN).
FLUTURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "butterfly" in Albanian.
FRANKIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRANGK-ee
Personal note: Nickname
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
FRAÑSEZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Breton feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
GLADWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GLAD-win
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: glawr-ee-AN-ə
Personal note: Like
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
GRACIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: gra-THYA-na(European Spanish) gra-SYA-na(Latin American Spanish) grə-SYA-nə(Portuguese)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of GRACIANO.
GRATIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: GRAY-shən(English)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the Roman name Gratianus, which meant "grace" from Latin gratus. Saint Gratian was the first bishop of Tours (4th century). This was also the name of a Roman emperor.
GRAYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GREER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRIR(English)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GRETCHEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Pronounced: GREHT-khən(German) GRECH-ən(English)
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GUDRUN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: GOO-droon(German)
Personal note: Fun
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
HANIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: KHA-nya
Personal note: Like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Polish diminutive of HANNA (1).
HAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-vən
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HONORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Variant of HONORIA. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
HYACINTH (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth
Personal note: Really like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see HYACINTHUS).
HYWEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Means "eminent" in Welsh. This was the name of a 10th-century king of Wales.
ILAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אִילָן(Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "tree" in Hebrew.
ILANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אִילָנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ILAN.
INNES
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.
IONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: ie-O-nə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
IRVINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: UR-vien(English) UR-vin(English)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of IRVING.
IRWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-win
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
JEHONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: yeh-HAWN-ah
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Derived from Albanian jehonë meaning "echo".
JERIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְרִיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "taught by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Jeriah is a descendant of Hebron.
JESPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: YEHS-bu(Danish) YEHS-pehr(Swedish)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Danish form of JASPER.
JETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHT
Personal note: Really like Jeton - albanian for life
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
JOTHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹתָם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-thəm(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "YAHWEH is perfect" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a son of Gideon and a king of Judah.
JOYCE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOIS
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
KAI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Pronounced: KIE(German, Swedish, Finnish)
Personal note: Like (as nickname for Kaizen)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAT
Personal note: Quite like as nickname for Katrice
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KAYCEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-see
Personal note: Kinda Like
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Feminine variant of CASEY.
KELLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHL-ee
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Variant of KELLY.
KELSEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHL-see
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of KENNETH.
KENNETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KEHN-əth(English)
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KENZIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-zee
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Short form of MACKENZIE.
KEREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: קֶרֶן(Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "horn" or "ray of light" in Hebrew.
KERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of KARENA.
KERENSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "love" in Cornish.
LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.
LANGDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LANG-dən
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was a variant of the surname LANDON.
LEANORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Short form of ELEANORA.
LEWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LINCOLN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LING-kən
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 80% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was originally from the name of a city in England, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
LIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na(Italian)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.
LOLICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Elaborated form of LOLA.
LOREN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LORNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWRN
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From the title 'Marquis of Lorne', which was based on the Scottish place name Lorne, itself possibly derived from the name of the legendary king of Dál Riata, Loarn mac Eirc. This was the title of the first Governor General of Canada, where it has since been most frequently used as a given name. A famous bearer was the Canadian actor Lorne Greene (1915-1987).
LUCILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: LUY-SEEL(French) loo-SEEL(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).
LUCINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Literature
Pronounced: loo-SIN-də(English)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
LULE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Means "flower" in Albanian.
LYALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Liulfr (which was derived in part from úlfr "wolf").
MAEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
MAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Tupi
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "great grandmother, wise" in Tupi.
MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm(English)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From Scottish Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MALDWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Welsh form of BALDWIN.
MAUD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: MAWD(English) MOD(French)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).
MAXEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MAK-sən
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of MACSEN.
MERCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Latinate form of MERCY. This was also the name of an old Anglo-Saxon kingdom, though it has a different origin.
MEREDITH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MERIT (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MEHR-it
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Either a variant of MERRITT or else simply from the English word merit, ultimately from Latin meritus "deserving".
MERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHR-ik
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.
MIRNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Мирна(Serbian)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "peaceful" in Serbian and Croatian.
MONTY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHN-tee
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of MONTE.
MUNGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Welsh mwyn "gentle, kind". This was a nickname of the 6th-century Saint Kentigern.
NADINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: NA-DEEN(French) na-DEE-nə(German) nay-DEEN(English)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NEKODA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נְקוֹדָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: nee-KO-də(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "marked" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the head of a family of temple servants.
NORMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: NAWR-mən(English)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From an old Germanic byname meaning "northman", referring to a Viking. The Normans were Vikings who settled on the coast of France, in the region that became known as Normandy. In England the name Norman or Normant was used before the Norman Conquest, first as a nickname for Scandinavian settlers and later as a given name. After the Conquest it became more common, but died out around the 14th century. It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to a character by this name in C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Daisy Chain' (1856).
ODESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
OSWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AHZ-win
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman Conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OZ (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עוֹז(Hebrew)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "strength" in Hebrew.
PALOMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pa-LO-ma
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
PERCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PUR-see
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name that was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PEYTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYT-ən
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PHERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Manx form of PATRICK.
PIRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from CIARÁN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish monk who founded a monastery in Cornwall. He is the patron saint of Cornwall.
POLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHL-ee
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PROSPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: PRAWS-PEHR(French) PRAHS-pər(English)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
QUINCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KWIN-see
Personal note: Like
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the personal name QUINTIUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.
RADEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Polish
Personal note: Fun
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with rad meaning "happy, willing".
RAIN (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAYN
Personal note: Rayne/Raine Keshet
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RAOUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Italian
Pronounced: RA-OOL(French)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
French form of Radulf (see RALPH).
RAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-vən
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RAVENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: rə-VEHN-ə
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
RAZIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: רָזִיאֵלָה(Hebrew)
Personal note: Angel
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of RAZIEL.
REINA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: ריינאַ(Yiddish)
Personal note: Really love
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Derived from Yiddish ריין (rein) meaning "clean, pure".
REYNOLD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHN-əld
Personal note: Really like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
RIORDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of RÓRDÁN.
ROHESIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)
Personal note: Kinda Like
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see ROSE).
RONALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAHN-əld(English)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Personal note: Like
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROWINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ro-EEN-ə
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Variant of ROWENA.
ROXANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə
Personal note: Like
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Variant of ROXANA.
ROZENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "rose" in Breton.
RŮŽENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: ROO-zheh-na
Personal note: Really Like
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".
SAGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
Pronounced: SAH-gah(Swedish) SA-gha(Icelandic)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".
SAGE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SELIG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: סעליג(Yiddish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Variant of ZELIG.
SELWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-win
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SEQUOIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-KWOI-ə
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: sehr-ə-FEEN-ə(English) zeh-ra-FEE-na(German)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SIEGFRIED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: ZEEK-freet(German)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGLINDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: zeek-LIN-də(German)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied'.
SILVIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SIL-vee-əs(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SOL (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "sun" in Spanish or Portuguese.
SOL (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Short form of SOLOMON.
SOLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σολων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly from Greek σολος (solos) meaning "lump of iron". This was the name of an Athenian statesman who reformed the laws and government of the city.
STANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Стана(Serbian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of STANISLAVA and other Slavic names beginning with the element stani meaning "stand, become".
STANLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAN-lee
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa. As a given name, it was borne by American director Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), as well as the character Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947).
STELLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
TALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Թալին(Armenian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Alternate transcription of Armenian Թալին (see TALIN).
TAMAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Quechua
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "in the center" in Quechua.
TASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Τασια(Greek)
Personal note: Really love (or Tasiana)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Short form of ANASTASIA.
TAVISH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Thàmhais, vocative case of TÀMHAS. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname MacTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Thomas".
TEMITOPE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "enough to give thanks" in Yoruba.
TEMPERANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
TEMPEST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHM-pist
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "storm". It appears in the title of William Shakespeare's play 'The Tempest' (1611).
TEMPLE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHM-pəl
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who was associated with the Knights Templar, a medieval religious military order.
TERESA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: teh-REH-sa(Spanish, Polish) teh-REH-za(Italian, German) TEH-reh-sah(Finnish) tə-REE-sə(English) tə-REE-zə(English)
Personal note: Really like (nn Terri)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Form of THERESA used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TERRY (2)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHR-ee
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died of the disease before crossing the country.
THALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Other Scripts: Θαλεια(Greek)
Pronounced: THAY-lee-ə(English) thə-LIE-ə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
TRUDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TROO-dee(English) TRUY-dee(Dutch)
Personal note: Quite Like
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
TULLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Tullius (see TULLIO).
TYCHO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: TUY-go(Danish) TIE-ko(English)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of TYGE. This name was borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
UNICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of EUNICE.
VÂN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Vietnamese
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Sino-Vietnamese (vân) meaning "cloud".
VARINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Personal note: Like
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of VARINIUS.
VARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: Like (Varian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Roman family name meaning "versatile" in Latin. Varius Rufus was a Roman epic poet of the 1st century BC.
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: veh-REH-na(German)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.
VERITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VEHR-i-tee
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
VITALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of VITALE.
WENZEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VEHN-tsəl
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Medieval German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
WILEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-lee
Personal note: Fun
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from various English place names: towns named WILLEY or the River WYLYE.
WILFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-frəd
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WINOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, French
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Variant of GWENNEG.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang(German) WUWLF-gang(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WULFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Old English form of ULRIC.
WYNNE (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIN
Personal note: Quite like (or Wyndham)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name WINE.
XENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξενια(Greek)
Personal note: Like
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.
YAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יָעֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: YA-ehl(Hebrew)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of JAEL.
YVAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Form of OWAIN used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his Arthurian tales.
ZANE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.
ZENZI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: TSEHN-tsee
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of KRESZENZ.
ZORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Personal note: Quite like
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
ZORION
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "happiness" in Basque.
ZOYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Зоя(Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ZO-yə(Russian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of ZOE.
ZURI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Personal note: Like
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful" in Swahili.
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