Sofia's Personal Name List

ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), a-DAWN (French), AH-dahm (German, Polish), AH:-dahm (Dutch), ah-DAHM (Russian, Ukrainian)

Rating: 64% based on 28 votes

This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

Rating: 61% based on 21 votes

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian

Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)

Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), AHD-ryahn (Polish), AH-dree-ahn (German), ah-dree-AHN (Russian)

Rating: 57% based on 15 votes

Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

AILSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 41% based on 13 votes

From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.

ALASDAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 75% based on 25 votes

Scottish form of ALEXANDER

ALEXIS

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αλεξης (Greek), Αλεξις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ah-LEK-sis (German), al-ek-SEE (French), ə-LEK-sis (English)

Rating: 54% based on 18 votes

From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.

AMADEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs (English), ahm-ə-DEE-əs (English)

Rating: 52% based on 25 votes

Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.

ANASTASIOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αναστασιος (Greek)

Rating: 41% based on 10 votes

Original Greek form of ANASTASIUS

ANDREA (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ahn-DRE-ah

Rating: 40% based on 25 votes

Italian form of Andreas (see ANDREW). A notable bearer of this name was Andrea Verrocchio, a Renaissance sculptor who taught Leonardo da Vinci and Perugino.

ANEIRIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 41% based on 9 votes

Welsh name, originally spelled Neirin, which possibly means "noble". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet.

ANEURIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 40% based on 25 votes

Form of ANEIRIN

ANGEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Ангел (Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AYN-jəl (English)

Personal note: middle name

Rating: 36% based on 17 votes

From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.

ANIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene

Pronounced: AH-nee-kah (German)

Rating: 56% based on 25 votes

German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.

ANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: AN-a (English), AHN-nah (Italian, Dutch, Polish), AH-nah (German, Russian)

Rating: 70% based on 26 votes

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

ANNABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AN-ə-beth

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

Combination of ANNA and BETH

ANOUK

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, French

Rating: 48% based on 14 votes

Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA

ANTIGONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αντιγονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 37% based on 17 votes

Means "against birth" from Greek αντι (anti) "against" and γονη (gone) "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.

ARIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֲרִיאֵל (Hebrew), Αριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AR-ee-əl (English), ER-ee-əl (English), AY-ree-əl (English)

Rating: 18% based on 10 votes

Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).

ATENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Catalan, Croatian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Serbian

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Catalan, Croatian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese and Romanian form of [Athena].

ATHENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 55% based on 13 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

AUDREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-ree

Rating: 59% based on 24 votes

Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Rating: 59% based on 24 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AURORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: ow-RO-rah (Spanish), ə-RAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 27 votes

Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AUSTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWS-tin

Rating: 37% based on 13 votes

Medieval contracted form of AUGUSTINE (1). Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.

BARBARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: BAHR-bər-ə (English), BAHR-brə (English), BAHR-bah-rah (German), bahr-BAH-rah (Polish)

Rating: 39% based on 17 votes

Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.

BASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: BAHS-tee-ahn

Rating: 34% based on 11 votes

Short form of SEBASTIAN

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Rating: 64% based on 25 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BELÉN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: be-LEN

Rating: 48% based on 26 votes

Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is derived via Greek from Hebrew בֵּית לָחֶם (beit lachem) meaning "house of bread".

BELMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bosnian, Turkish

Pronounced: BEL-mah, BEL-mə (Bosnian)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Said to mean "sunshine" in Bosnian.
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Turkish name meaning "tender; soft; calm".

BETHANY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 39% based on 14 votes

From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BOJAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Slovene, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian

Other Scripts: Бојан (Macedonian, Serbian)

Rating: 37% based on 10 votes

Derived from Slavic boj meaning "battle".

BOLTO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Croatian

Pronounced: BAWL-taw

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Croatian short form of [Baltazar], cognate of Slovene [Boltežar] and Hungarian [Boldizsár].

BRAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: BRAHM

Rating: 48% based on 24 votes

Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.

BRODY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BRO-dee

Rating: 26% based on 16 votes

From an Irish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ditch" in Gaelic.

BYRON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BIE-rən

Rating: 37% based on 9 votes

From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of 'Don Juan' and many other works.

CALLUM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: KAL-um

Rating: 65% based on 13 votes

Variant of CALUM

CHARLOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: shar-LOT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shahr-LAW-tə (German), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)

Rating: 69% based on 27 votes

French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Bronte sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CONNOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)

Rating: 64% based on 13 votes

Variant of CONOR

DALIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)

Rating: 60% based on 24 votes

Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 53% based on 23 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DECLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 61% based on 18 votes

Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DELANEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: də-LAYN-ee

Rating: 27% based on 22 votes

From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).

DENALI

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: də-NAHL-ee

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

From the indigenous Koyukon name of a mountain in Alaska, allegedly meaning "great one". Commonly known as Mount McKinley in the English-speaking world, Denali is the tallest peak in North America. It is also the name of a car brand (made by General Motors).

DMITAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Дмитар (Serbian)

Rating: 30% based on 10 votes

Croatian and Serbian form of DEMETRIUS

DOMINIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish, German, Hungarian, Croatian

Pronounced: daw-MEE-neek (Polish), DO-mi-nik (German)

Rating: 54% based on 22 votes

Cognate of DOMINIC

DOSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Personal note: nickname

Rating: 32% based on 12 votes

Diminutive of TEODOZJA or DOROTA

ELERI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 47% based on 23 votes

Meaning unknown. In Welsh legend she was the daughter of the chieftain Brychan.

ELIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ηλιας (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEE-ahs (German), i-LIE-əs (English), ee-LIE-əs (English)

Rating: 58% based on 10 votes

Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.

ELIJAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ (Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIE-jə (English), i-LIE-zhə (English)

Rating: 47% based on 17 votes

From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH". Elijah was a Hebrew prophet of the 9th century BC, during the reign of King Ahab and his queen, Jezebel. The two Books of Kings in the Old Testament tell of his exploits, which culminate with him being carried to heaven in a chariot of fire.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELISABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: e-LEE-zah-bet (German), e-LEE-sah-bet (Danish), i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

Rating: 74% based on 25 votes

German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.

EMANUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Portuguese, Czech, Croatian

Pronounced: e-MAH-nuw-el (German)

Rating: 51% based on 23 votes

Form of EMMANUEL

EMILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: e-MEEL-yah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 65% based on 23 votes

Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

ERDOĞAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Turkish

Other Scripts: Erdoğan

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Possible meanings
"Natural born soldier"
"Early born"
"Soldier Falcon"

Last form is relaetd to [Doğan]

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Personal note: pr. EH-vah

Rating: 64% based on 23 votes

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant Russian transcription of YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

FABIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, History

Pronounced: FAH-bee-ahn (German, Dutch), FAH-byahn (Polish), FAY-bee-ən (English)

Rating: 40% based on 23 votes

From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.

FÁTIMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Spanish

Rating: 44% based on 17 votes

From the name of a town in Portugal, which is derived from the Arabic feminine name FATIMAH, apparently after a Moorish princess who converted to Christianity during the Reconquista. The town became an important Christian pilgrimage center after 1917 when three local children reported witnessing repeated apparitions of the Virgin Mary.

FINLAY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English

Rating: 48% based on 16 votes

Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH

FLORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: FLAWR-ə (English), FLO-rah (German)

Rating: 66% based on 24 votes

Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.

FLORENCE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: FLAWR-ənts (English), flo-RAWNS (French)

Rating: 55% based on 25 votes

From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.

The name can also be given in reference to the city in Italy, as in the case of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). She was a nurse in British hospitals during the Crimean War and is usually considered the founder of modern nursing.

GABRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Rating: 63% based on 25 votes

From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "strong man of God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, where he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GABRIELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Габриела (Bulgarian)

Pronounced: gahp-RYE-lah (Polish), gah-BRYE-lah (Spanish), gahp-ree-E-lah (German)

Rating: 44% based on 24 votes

Feminine form of GABRIEL

GAVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GAV-in (English)

Rating: 34% based on 25 votes

Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GEORGIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek

Other Scripts: Γεωργια (Greek)

Pronounced: JOR-jə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 23 votes

Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).

GRACE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAYS

Rating: 60% based on 25 votes

From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRANYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 33% based on 9 votes

Variant of GRANIA

HAWK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

From the English word for 'hawk', a predatory bird.

HERMIONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 54% based on 23 votes

Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

IAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, Galician, Portuguese (Rare)

Pronounced: ee-AH-go (English), ee-A-gaw (Galician)

Rating: 36% based on 12 votes

Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This is the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Othello' (1603).

IAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: EE-ən (English)

Rating: 65% based on 17 votes

Modern Scottish form of JOHN

IANTO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 36% based on 12 votes

Diminutive of IFAN

IDRIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 43% based on 22 votes

Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".

IGNATIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs (English)

Rating: 54% based on 22 votes

From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.

IKER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 28% based on 12 votes

Means "visitation" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Visitación.

IMMANUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עִמָּנוּאֵל (Hebrew)

Rating: 39% based on 12 votes

Form of EMMANUEL used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.

IMRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: EEM-re

Rating: 35% based on 11 votes

Hungarian form of EMMERICH. This was the name of an 11th-century Hungarian saint, the son of Saint Istvan. He is also known as Emeric.

IÑAKI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 34% based on 23 votes

Basque form of IGNATIUS

IRA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Ира (Russian)

Rating: 35% based on 23 votes

Short form of IRINA

ISADORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 54% based on 16 votes

Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISAURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman

Pronounced: ee-SOW-rah (Spanish)

Rating: 42% based on 12 votes

Late Latin name which meant "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.

ISLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: IE-lə

Rating: 61% based on 14 votes

Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

ITAI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אִתַּי, אִיתַי (Hebrew)

Rating: 29% based on 12 votes

Hebrew form of ITHAI

IVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian, English

Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian, Ukrainian), IE-vən (English)

Rating: 60% based on 15 votes

Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.

IVANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Croatian, Italian

Pronounced: ee-VAH-naw

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Italian and Croatian variant form of [John].
Famous bearer: Croatian handballer Ivano Balić

IZIDOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Slovene

Rating: 42% based on 22 votes

Slovene form of ISIDORE

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 73% based on 15 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JASON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical

Other Scripts: Ιασων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: JAY-sən (English)

Rating: 48% based on 12 votes

From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JETHRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יִתְרוֹ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JETH-ro (English)

Rating: 48% based on 23 votes

From the Hebrew name יִתְרוֹ (Yitro), which was derived from the Hebrew word יֶתֶר (yeter) meaning "abundance". Jethro is the father of Moses's wife Zipporah in the Old Testament. A famous bearer of the name was Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English inventor and agriculturist.

JOÃO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Rating: 32% based on 22 votes

Portuguese form of Iohannes (see JOHN).

JONAS (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical

Pronounced: YO-nahs (German), JO-nəs (English)

Rating: 48% based on 23 votes

From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

Rating: 71% based on 24 votes

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

JOSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JO-zee

Rating: 44% based on 16 votes

Short form of JOSEPHINE

JOY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOI

Rating: 42% based on 12 votes

Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. Is has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.

JUDE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JOOD (English)

Rating: 59% based on 16 votes

Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

JULIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Literature, Estonian, Croatian, Serbian, Hungarian, Slovene

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Hungarian diminutive of [Julia], occasionally used in German-speaking countries.

Swiss author Max Frisch used this name on one of his characters in his novel I'm not Stiller, published in 1954.

JUSTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Slovene

Pronounced: JUS-tin (English), zhoo-STEN (French)

Rating: 38% based on 18 votes

From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century.

KARLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian

Pronounced: KAHR-lah (German)

Rating: 37% based on 14 votes

German, Scandinavian and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES

KARMELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian

Rating: 29% based on 7 votes

Croatian form of CARMELA

KINNERET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: כִּנֶּרֶת (Hebrew)

From the name of the large lake in northern Israel, usually called the Sea of Galilee in English. Its name is derived from Hebrew כִּנּוֹר (kinnor) meaning "harp" because of its shape.

KLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian

Other Scripts: Клара (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (German, Russian, Polish)

Rating: 54% based on 16 votes

Form of CLARA

KOLYA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Коля (Russian)

Rating: 28% based on 21 votes

Diminutive of NIKOLAI

KONSTANTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Hungarian, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Константин (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: KAWN-stahn-teen (German), kahn-stahn-TEEN (Russian)

Rating: 54% based on 22 votes

Cognate of CONSTANTINE

KORBINIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: kawr-BEE-nee-ahn

Rating: 38% based on 10 votes

Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see Raban).

KOSTA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Коста (Bulgarian)

Rating: 50% based on 21 votes

Bulgarian diminutive of KONSTANTIN

LACHLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)

Rating: 67% based on 16 votes

Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Лана (Russian, Serbian)

Rating: 47% based on 11 votes

Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).

LARA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian

Other Scripts: Лара (Russian)

Pronounced: LAHR-ə (English), LAH-rah (German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

Rating: 56% based on 10 votes

Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).

LARISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Latvian, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Лариса (Russian, Ukrainian), Λαρισα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: lah-REE-sah (Russian)

Rating: 47% based on 9 votes

Possibly derived from the name of the ancient city of Larisa in Thessaly, which meant "citadel". In Greek mythology, the nymph Larisa was a daughter of Pelasgus. This name was later borne by a 4th-century Greek martyr who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Church.

LÁSZLÓ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: LAHS-lo

Rating: 55% based on 20 votes

Hungarian form of VLADISLAV. Saint László was an 11th-century king of Hungary, looked upon as the embodiment of Christian virtue and bravery.

LEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian

Pronounced: LE-ah (German)

Rating: 49% based on 20 votes

Form of LEAH

LEANDRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: le-AHN-dro (Spanish)

Rating: 38% based on 9 votes

Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LEANDER

LEONIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Spanish, Polish, Russian, Croatian, Slovene

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of [Leonidas].

LEONIDAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεωνιδας (Greek)

Rating: 44% based on 11 votes

From Greek λεων (leon) "lion". Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.

LIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)

Rating: 57% based on 12 votes

Irish short form of WILLIAM

LIRON

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִירוֹן (Hebrew)

Rating: 40% based on 23 votes

Means "song for me" or "joy for me" in Hebrew.

LORNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: LAWR-nə

Rating: 40% based on 10 votes

Created by the novelist R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869). He may have based it on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title 'Marquis of Lorne' (see LORNE).

LOVEDAY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LUV-day

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Medieval form of the Old English name [Lēofdæg], literally "beloved day". Mainly a feminine name, with some male usage. Known textual examples date from the 11th century. It seems to have been most common in Cornwall and Devon, according to the British births, deaths and marriages index. Currently very rare.

The novel 'Coming Home' by Rosamunde Pilcher, set in 1930s Cornwall, has a character called Loveday. Loveday Minette is a fictional character in the children's fantasy novel 'The Little White Horse' by Elizabeth Goudge (in the novel's film adaptation, she is known as Loveday de Noir).

LUCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHEE-ah (Italian), LOO-tsee-ah (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English)

Rating: 63% based on 24 votes

Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th-century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUKA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Лука (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian), ლუკა (Georgian), Лѹка (Church Slavic)

Rating: 52% based on 21 votes

Form of LUKE

LYSANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λυσανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 69% based on 25 votes

From the Greek name Λυσανδρος (Lysandros) which meant "a release of a man" from Greek λυσις (lysis) "a release" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". This was the name of a Spartan general and naval commander.

LYSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λυσανδρα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 52% based on 10 votes

Feminine form of Lysandros (see LYSANDER).

MAGALI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Occitan

Pronounced: ma-ga-LEE (French)

Rating: 40% based on 11 votes

Occitan form of MAGDALENE

MAGDALENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish, English

Other Scripts: Магдалена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Pronounced: mahk-dah-LE-nah (German), mahg-dah-LE-nah (Polish), mag-da-LAY-na (English)

Rating: 61% based on 23 votes

Latinate form of MAGDALENE

MAKARIOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Greek

Other Scripts: Μακαριος (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 37% based on 23 votes

Original Greek form of MACARIO

MALACHI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)

Rating: 57% based on 15 votes

From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MARTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Georgian

Other Scripts: Марта (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მართა (Georgian)

Pronounced: MAHR-tah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech)

Rating: 59% based on 16 votes

Cognate of MARTHA

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English)

Rating: 65% based on 22 votes

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MATTHEW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MATH-yoo (English)

Rating: 50% based on 23 votes

English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first Gospel in the New Testament. As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages.

MAXIMILIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: mahk-see-MEE-lee-ahn (German), mak-si-MIL-ee-ən (English), mak-si-MIL-yən (English)

Rating: 49% based on 23 votes

From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.

MAXIMILLIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mak-si-MIL-ee-ən, mak-si-MIL-yən

Rating: 36% based on 23 votes

Variant of MAXIMILIAN

NAUSIKAJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene

Pronounced: now-see-KIE-ah

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Croatian form of [Nausicaa].

NAZLI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 30% based on 6 votes

Turkish form of NAZLI

NEPOMUK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Czech, Dutch, German

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Slavic name meaning "from Pomuk" or "born in Pomuk", derived from ne "from" and Pomuk "Pomuk." Pomuk is a place in Bohemia, Czech Republic. A bearer of this name was Johann Nepomuk Hummel, a 19th-century Bohemian composer and virtuoso pianist.

NERA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian, Hebrew

Other Scripts: נֵרה

Pronounced: NER-ah, NE-rah (Croatian), nehr-ah, NEER-ə (Hebrew)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of [Ner]. It also means "candle" in Hebrew (hence may be given to girls born during Hanukkah).

NESSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NES-ə

Rating: 55% based on 11 votes

Short form of VANESSA and other names ending in nessa.

NINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Нина (Russian, Serbian)

Pronounced: NEE-nah (Russian, Italian, German, Polish), NEE-nə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 25 votes

Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".

NOA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹעָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Hebrew form of NOAH (2)

NOAH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹחַ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: NO-ə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 13 votes

Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

NOAM

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: נוֹעַם (Hebrew)

Rating: 41% based on 11 votes

Means "pleasantness" in Hebrew. A famous bearer is Noam Chomsky (1928-), an American linguist and philosopher.

NOOR (1)

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Pakistani, Urdu

Other Scripts: نور (Arabic, Urdu)

Rating: 38% based on 11 votes

Variant transcription of NUR

NYX

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Νυξ (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 35% based on 17 votes

Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.

OCTAVIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History, Romanian

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 48% based on 21 votes

From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name OCTAVIUS. After Gaius Octavius (later Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Rating: 57% based on 23 votes

Modern form of OWAIN

PACEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PAY-see

Rating: 21% based on 16 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.

PÁDRAIGÍN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: PAW-dri-geen

Rating: 42% based on 9 votes

Irish form of PATRICIA

PAVEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Павел (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: PAH-vyel (Russian), PAH-veel (Russian)

Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene and Macedonian form of PAUL

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 57% based on 25 votes

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PERUN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Slavic Mythology

Rating: 38% based on 10 votes

Means "thunder" in Slavic. In Slavic mythology Perun was the god of lightning, sometimes worshipped as the primary god. The oak was his sacred tree.

PETAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Other Scripts: Petalon

Pronounced: PET-AL

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

A petal (from ancient Greek petalon "leaf", "thin plate", one of the component parts of the corolla of a flower, petals are often attractive and brightly coloured.

POPPY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: PAH-pee

Rating: 38% based on 10 votes

From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.

PORFIRIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Rating: 17% based on 7 votes

Derived from the Greek name Πορφυριος (Porphyrios), which was derived from the word πορφυρα (porphyra) meaning "purple dye". This was the name of several early saints.

PRIMROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PRIM-roz

Rating: 53% based on 19 votes

From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

RAFAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Рафаел (Macedonian)

Pronounced: rah-fah-EL (Spanish), RAH-fah-el (German)

Rating: 46% based on 10 votes

Form of RAPHAEL

REMIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Rating: 37% based on 6 votes

Means "mercy of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 55% based on 20 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

ROKO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Croatian

Rating: 31% based on 16 votes

Croatian form of ROCCO

RÓNÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: RON-awn

Rating: 59% based on 12 votes

Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

ROWAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: RO-ən (English)

Rating: 58% based on 18 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendent of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

SABRINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German

Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə (English), sah-BREE-nah (Italian), zahp-REE-nah (German)

Rating: 39% based on 9 votes

Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play 'Sabrina Fair' (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.

SANJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Сања (Serbian)

Rating: 47% based on 11 votes

Derived from Croatian and Serbian sanjati meaning "dream".

SAVANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə

Rating: 33% based on 24 votes

From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish)

Rating: 65% based on 26 votes

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SÉBASTIENNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 46% based on 11 votes

French feminine form of Sebastianus (see SEBASTIAN).

ŞEHRAZAD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

Turkish form of SHAHRAZAD

ŞEHRAZAT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 26% based on 9 votes

Turkish form of SHAHRAZAD

SELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: סֶלַע (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SEE-lə (English)

Rating: 32% based on 10 votes

Means "rock" in Hebrew. This was the name of a city, the capital of Edom, in the Old Testament.

SELMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: SEL-mə (English), ZEL-mah (German)

Rating: 21% based on 7 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.

SHADRACH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שַׁדְרַך (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SHAD-rak (English), SHAY-drak (English)

Rating: 34% based on 11 votes

Means "command of Aku" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament, Shadrach is the Babylonian name of Hananiah, one of the three men cast into a fiery furnace but saved by God.

SIMEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian

Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Симеон (Bulgarian, Serbian)

Pronounced: SIM-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 35% based on 10 votes

From the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament this is the name of a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. It was also borne by a powerful 10th-century ruler of Bulgaria.

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

Rating: 59% based on 25 votes

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SOFIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Slovak, Romanian

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: zo-FEE-ah (German), so-FEE-ah (Italian), soo-FEE-ə (Portuguese)

Rating: 71% based on 17 votes

Form of SOPHIA

SOPHIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: so-FEE (French), SO-fee (English), ZO-fee (German)

Rating: 66% based on 17 votes

French form of SOPHIA

SORAYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Iranian, Spanish, French

Other Scripts: ثریا (Persian)

Rating: 50% based on 23 votes

Persian form of THURAYYA. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya, wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.

SØREN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian

Pronounced: SUU-ren

Rating: 60% based on 18 votes

Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.

SVEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch

Pronounced: SVEN (German)

Rating: 56% based on 25 votes

From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy".

TARKA

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Literature

Pronounced: tar-ka (English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Name of the otter in the novel 'Tarka the Otter' by Henry Williamson, first published in 1927. There is also a film made in 1979, based on the novel. Occasionally used as a male and female name, most notably Tarka Cordell, a British musician, writer, record producer, and sometime model.

TEMPERANCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: TEM-prənts, TEM-pər-ənts

Rating: 41% based on 27 votes

From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

TERESA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: te-RE-sah (Spanish, Polish), te-RE-zah (Italian, German), tə-REE-sə (English), tə-REE-zə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 15 votes

Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.

TESNI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.

THEODOSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδοσια (Greek)

Rating: 43% based on 22 votes

Feminine form of THEODOSIUS

TORARIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Norwegian

Pronounced: Tóra-rihn

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Norwegian form of [Þórarinn].

ÙNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: OO-na

Rating: 33% based on 16 votes

Scottish form of ÚNA

VALENTINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Валентина (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: vah-len-TEE-nah (Italian), vah-lyen-TEE-nah (Russian), vah-leen-TEE-nah (Russian)

Rating: 46% based on 25 votes

Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.

VICTORIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 54% based on 12 votes

Feminine form of VICTORIUS, though later it was regarded as coming directly from Latin victoria meaning "victory". It was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa. Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VINCENTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: veen-CHEN-te

Rating: 47% based on 23 votes

Italian variant form of VINCENT

VIOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vee-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYO-lah (Italian)

Rating: 56% based on 24 votes

Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 74% based on 24 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WOLFGANG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic, History

Pronounced: VAWLF-gahng (German), WUWLF-gang (English)

Rating: 59% based on 16 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

WREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: REN

Rating: 51% based on 10 votes

From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

YNYR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: UN-eer

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Welsh form of [Honorius].

ZINOVIY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Зиновий (Russian)

Pronounced: zee-NO-vee

Rating: 28% based on 9 votes

Russian form of the Greek name Ζηνοβιος (Zenobios), the masculine form of ZENOBIA.

ZOYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Ukrainian

Other Scripts: Зоя (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ZO-yah (Russian)

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

Russian and Ukrainian form of ZOE
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.