erb816's Personal Name List

ALAFARE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Romani
Pronounced: AL-ə-fer(English) AHL-ə-fer(English)
Rating: 31% based on 8 votes
Of extremely uncertain origin and meaning.
In the US, this name was first found in 1768; in the UK, there were several uses throughout the 1800s (and most likely before that as well). While the background of the American bearers of this name is unknown, almost all British bearers were born to traveling Romani families.

This makes it very difficult to determine the name's roots. It has been speculated to be a corruption of ALETHEA, ALLOVERA, ALFHER, ALEFERNA, or Aliofar (see ALJOHAR).

AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AMYAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: pronounced AM-ee-əs
Rating: 53% based on 23 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
ANTIGONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αντιγονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 59% based on 35 votes
Derived from Greek αντι (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and γονη (gone) meaning "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.
APHRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Personal note: pronounced AHF-rə
Rating: 35% based on 53 votes
Meaning uncertain; possibly a variant of AFRA (1), or possibly a variant of Aphrah, a biblical place name meaning "dust". This name was borne by the English writer Aphra Behn (1640-1689).
ARAMIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 51% based on 23 votes
The surname of one of the musketeers in The Three Musketeers (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on the 17th-century Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits (itself from Basque aran meaning "valley").
ARES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αρης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REHS(Classical Greek) ER-eez(English)
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) meaning "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) meaning "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the bloodthirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
ARETAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Αρετας(Ancient Greek)
Personal note: nickname Ret
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Greek form of an Aramaic name, of unknown meaning. This was the name of four Nabataean kings of Petra in Jordan, including the first king (2nd century BC). King Aretas IV is mentioned briefly in the New Testament.
ATHOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Literature, French
Other Scripts: Άεθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-thos(Greek Mythology, Literature) A-THOS(French)
Rating: 45% based on 21 votes
Athos was one of the Gigantes, children of GAIA, who hurled a mountain at ZEUS. Zeus knocked the mountain to the ground near Macedonia, and it became Mount Athos, or the "Holy Mountain."

In "The Three Musketeers" by Père Alexandre Dumas, Athos is one of the titular characters, his name deriving from the village of Athos in the commune Athos-Aspis.

BEREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 26% based on 9 votes
Means "brave" in Sindarin. Beren (also known as Beren Erchamion, 'the One-handed', and Beren Camlost, 'the Empty-handed') is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. He was the son of BARAHIR and EMELDIR, the husband of LÚTHIEN, the father of Dior Eluchíl, and ancestor of ELROS and of him of ARAGORN, and ancestor of ELROND and of him ARWEN. The character of Beren and his romance with Lúthien is widely believed to be based on J.R.R. Tolkien and his romance with his wife Edith.
CAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קָיִן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAYN(English)
Rating: 47% based on 55 votes
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
CHARLIZE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Afrikaans
Pronounced: shar-LEEZ
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of CHARLES using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.
CIRCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κιρκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SUR-see(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κιρκη (Kirke), which possibly meant "bird". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs but was forced by him to change them back.
CLYTEMNESTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλυταιμνηστρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: klie-təm-NEHS-trə(English)
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κλυταιμνηστρα (Klytaimnestra), from κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble" and μνηστηρ (mnester) meaning "courter, wooer". In Greek legend Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon and the mother of Orestes and Electra. While her husband was away during the Trojan War she took a lover, and upon his return she had him murdered. She was subsequently killed by Orestes.
DAMARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Δαμαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAM-ə-ris(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δαμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
D'ARTAGNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 40% based on 24 votes
Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwest France. This was the name of a character in the novel The Three Musketeers (1884) by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel D'Artagnan is an aspiring musketeer who first duels with the three title characters and then becomes their friend.
DOMINO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAHM-ə-no
Rating: 34% based on 8 votes
Short form of DOMINIQUE. It was used by author Ian Fleming in his James Bond novel 'Thunderball' (1961), where the nickname belongs to Bond's Italian love interest DOMINETTA "Domino" Vitali (renamed Dominique "Domino" and simply Domino in the 1965 and 1983 film adaptations, respectively). A known bearer was English bounty hunter Domino Harvey (1969-2005), whose mother named her for the French model Dominique "Domino" Sanda (1951-).
DOVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUV
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
ELEKTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ηλεκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-LEHK-TRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Greek form of ELECTRA.
ELESSAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ELL-ess-ahr
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
Created by JRR Tolkien for his The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. This is the name, meaning Elfstone, given to Aragorn in Lórien by Galadriel and later adopted by him as King of Gondor.
ELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHL
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
ELSPETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: EHLS-peth
Rating: 47% based on 32 votes
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
EVERARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 47% based on 7 votes
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
FARAMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FAH-rah-meer
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Meaning uncertain. Probably "sufficient jewel" from the Sindarin far meaning "sufficient, adequate" and mir meaning "jewel, precious thing." In J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Lord of the Rings', Faramir was the son of Denethor, brother of Boromir, and eventual husband of Eowyn.
FARAMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 29% based on 7 votes
Variant of FARAMUND.
FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 40% based on 15 votes
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
GAHERIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: gə-HE-ris
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
This is the name of a character in Arthurian tales, a brother of GAWAIN (as well as GARETH, Mordred and Agravain), and the son of King Lot and either Belisent or MORGAUSE. 'The earliest form of his name is so similar to the earliest form of Gareth (Gahariet) that the two brothers may have originally been the same character.' First mentioned by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, although scholars have suggested a derivation from the Welsh name Gweir, which belongs to a number of warriors in Welsh legends and can mean "hay", "collar", "circle", "loop" or "bend".
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
Rating: 49% based on 15 votes
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
HAVEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-vən
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAWTHORN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Transferred use of the surname HAWTHORN.
HEREWARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Personal note: pronounced HER-ə-wərd
Rating: 29% based on 15 votes
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HUGHARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Personal note: pronounced HYOO-ərd
Rating: 30% based on 15 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and hard "brave, hardy".
IMLAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: IM-lahk
Rating: 28% based on 28 votes
Perhaps based on the Scottish surname Imlach, derived from the Old Gaelic imeallach or imleach, meaning "marginal land" or "marshy shore-land." Imlac is the poet friend of the titular character in Samuel Johnson's "Rasselas," who joins his friend on his voyage out of their homeland in the pursuit of happiness.
IMMANUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עִמָּנוּאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-MA-nwehl(German)
Rating: 54% based on 19 votes
Form of EMMANUEL used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.
INDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
Rating: 47% based on 16 votes
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
IO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ιω(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-AW(Classical Greek) IE-o(English)
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
ISABEAU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French, French (Rare), Dutch (Modern)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Medieval French variant of ISABEL. A famous bearer of this name was Isabeau of Bavaria (1385-1422), wife of the French king Charles VI.
JACQUETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Rating: 35% based on 38 votes
Feminine diminutive of JACQUES.
JETHRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִתְרוֹ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JETH-ro(English)
Rating: 59% based on 24 votes
From the Hebrew name יִתְרוֹ (Yitro), which was derived from the Hebrew word יֶתֶר (yeter) meaning "abundance". According to the Old Testament, Jethro was a Midianite priest who sheltered Moses when he fled Egypt. He was the father of Zipporah, who became Moses's wife. A famous bearer of the name was Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English inventor and agriculturist.
JEZEBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אִיזֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHZ-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 35% based on 18 votes
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel), which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.
KESTREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KEHS-trəl
Personal note: nickname Kess
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
LARUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: lə-ROO
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Possibly a combination of the popular prefix La with the name RUE. It also coincides with the French phrase la rue meaning "the street". In America, Larue was used to some extent from the end of the 19th century until the end of World War II.
MAGDALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian), Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic), Biblical Hebrew, Literature
Pronounced: MAHG-dah-lah(Latin American Spanish) MAG-də-lə(Hispanic American)
Rating: 58% based on 28 votes
From the biblical, historic village on the Sea of Galilee, whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. It is where Mary Magdalene was from.

It is the name of a central character in the Agatha Christie mystery novel "Peril at End House," which features detective Hercule Poirot.

OLIVETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ahl-i-VEHT(English)
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
Feminine form of OLIVER. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
OZIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Οζιας(Ancient Greek)
Personal note: pronounced o-ZIE-as
Rating: 38% based on 32 votes
Form of UZZIAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 10 votes
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) meaning "all" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
PHYLLIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FIL-i-də
Rating: 52% based on 25 votes
From Φυλλιδος (Phyllidos), the genitive form of PHYLLIS. This form was used in 17th-century pastoral poetry.
PRENTICE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PREN-tis
Rating: 27% based on 30 votes
From a surname derived from Middle English aprentis "apprentice" (ultimately from Latin apprehendere "to understand, grasp"), originally given as a nickname to one who was learning a craft or trade.
REMIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Variant of JEREMIEL appearing in some versions of the Old Testament.
RENFRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: REN-free
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Taken from the surname Renfrew, which is the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Rinn Friù, meaning "cradle of the Royal Stewards." It may also be inspired by the English phrase "run free."

In the book series The Witcher, as well as the television adaptation, Renfri is an exiled princess who was born during a solar eclipse, and thus allegedly filled a prophecy along with many other girls who would bring about the end of the world. Because of this she was pursued by the obsessed sorcerer Stregobor and vilified by her stepmother, who sent thugs to kill her in the forest. Eventually she became the leader of a band of thieves and vowed vengeance on Stregobor, and Geralt of Rivia attempted to persuade her to abandon this quest.

RHETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHT
Rating: 57% based on 44 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
RHONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.
RIO (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
RONETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: rahn-ET(English) ron-ET(English)
Rating: 27% based on 15 votes
Diminutive of VERONICA, which experienced some popularity in the United States in the wake of the 60s girl group The Ronettes. The lead singer of the band's name at birth was Veronica Bennett.

Ronette can also be considered a variant of RONNETTE, though that has a separate etymology.

SANSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Indian, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAHN-zə(Literature)
Rating: 32% based on 10 votes
Sanskrit word meaning, "praise" or "charm." Used by American author George R.R. Martin for his epic fantasy book series 'A Song of Ice and Fire'. Lady Sansa Stark is the second child and elder daughter of EDDARD and CATELYN Stark. She serves as a POV character for twenty-four chapters throughout 'A Game of Thrones', 'A Clash of Kings', 'A Storm of Swords', and 'A Feast for Crows'. Initially betrothed to Crown Prince JOFFREY Baratheon, she is eventually married to his uncle TYRION Lannister. English actress Sophie Turner portrays her in the HBO television adaptation 'Game of Thrones'.
SAPPHIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-ie-ər
Rating: 50% based on 17 votes
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SCHEHERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Personal note: nickname Zadie
Rating: 50% based on 37 votes
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SETHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SETH-ee
Personal note: pronounced SETH-ee
Rating: 19% based on 13 votes
Created by Toni Morrison for her Pulitzer prize-winning novel "Beloved." Sethe is the mother of the title character, whom she murders out of an extreme act of love: she would rather kill her child than give it up to the hands of slavery.

It was possibly used in the novel as a female version of SETH.

SHILOH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo(English)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt gave it to their daughter in 2006.
SOLEIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: SAW-LAY(French)
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Means "sun" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.
SOLENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: SO-LEN(French) so-LEN(Breton)
Rating: 53% based on 23 votes
Variant of SOLÈNE.
SORSHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: SOR-shə
Rating: 47% based on 44 votes
The name of a character in Ron Howard's movie "Willow" (1988). In it, she is a princess, the daughter of the evil Queen Bavmorda. She ends up betraying her mother to serve the cause of good. George Lucas, who wrote the story for the movie, may have based Sorsha's name on either SORCHA or SAOIRSE.
SYNTYCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Συντυχη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIN-tə-kee(English)
Ancient Greek name derived from συντυχια (syntychia) meaning "occurrence, event". This is the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Philippians in the New Testament.
TESLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Canadian, Rare), English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: TEZ-lin(Canadian English)
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
From the name of the mountain, plateau, river, and lake in Yukon and British Columbia, Canada. It comes from the Tlingit name for the river, Teslintoo or Teslintuh, meaning "long, deep water."
THÉODEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: THAY-aw-den
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Means "king, ruler" in Old English, probably from þeud "people" and þegen "thane, warrior" This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Théoden is the king of Rohan.
THEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Popular Culture, Literature
Other Scripts: Θέων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 26 votes
Derived from Greek θεόν (theon) meaning "(of the) gods." Theon of Smyrna was a Greek philosopher and mathematician from the 2nd century AD.
THEOPHANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοφανια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of THEOPHANES.
THOMASIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAWM-ə-sin
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of THOMAS.
TIAMAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒋾𒊩𒆳, 𒀭𒌓𒌈(Akkadian Cuneiform)
Pronounced: TEE-ə-maht(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 25 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TISSAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ti-SAY-ə
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. It could be based on an elaboration of TESS, or an alteration of TAISIA (the Russian and Ukrainian form of THAÏS). In the fantasy series The Witcher by Andrzej Sapkowski (and the TV series adaptation), Tissaia de Vries is the Rectoress of Aretuza, a training academy for female mages, and the mentor of Yennefer.
TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
Rating: 53% based on 21 votes
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
VERVEINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: VER-VEN
Personal note: pronounced ver-VEN
Rating: 35% based on 10 votes
French form of VERBENA.
VESPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Popular Culture
Pronounced: VES-pur(Popular Culture)
Rating: 44% based on 19 votes
Roman equivalent of HESPEROS. Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology, meaning that the ancient Romans had incorporated many elements from Greek mythology into their own. Thus, some names were directly taken from Greek mythology and romanized, rather than inventing a legitimate Latin equivalent of it. Vesper is an example of such a name.
The name is directly taken from the Latin word for "evening."

In popular culture, Vesper was the name of James Bond's partner, and later lover, in the novel Casino Royale.

WOODROW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WUWD-ro
Rating: 32% based on 17 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. This name was popularized by American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
WULFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Personal note: nickname Wulf / Wolf
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Old English form of ULRIC.
XANADU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Literature
Pronounced: ZAN-ə-doo(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Shangdu (meaning "Upper Capital"), the summer capital of Kublai, the fifth Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. The city, famously visited by Marco Polo in 1275, came into Western popular culture in the early 19th century via the Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem "Kubla Khan."
XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
YENNEFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: YEN-e-fer
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
In the fantasy series The Witcher by Andrzej Sapkowski (and the TV series adaptation), Yennefer is a powerful mage who, embittered by a cutthroat and ungracious society, leaves the Brotherhood of Northern Mages and goes rogue. Sapkowski likely based her name on the Polish pronunciation of JENNIFER.
YGRAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 44% based on 17 votes
Variant of IGRAINE. This name was used in the BBC television series 'Merlin' (2008-2012).
YORICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, English, Dutch
Pronounced: YAWR-ik(English) YAW-rik(Dutch) YO-rik(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 32 votes
Altered form of JØRG. Shakespeare used this name for a deceased court jester in his play Hamlet (1600).
ZACCAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זַכָּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Personal note: pronounced zə-KIE, nickname Zac
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name זַכָּי (Zakkai) meaning "pure". This is the name of a minor character in the Old Testament.
ZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 71% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
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