erb816's Personal Name List

ALINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Portuguese

Pronounced: ay-LEEN (English), ə-LEEN (Portuguese)

Personal note: 4. Aline Minerva

Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN.

AMALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch, German), AH-mah-lee-ah (Finnish)

Personal note: 6. Amalia Charlotte

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

DEIRDRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: DEER-drə (English), DEER-dree (English), DER-dre (Irish)

Personal note: 3. Deirdre Maeve

From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' 'Deirdre' (1907) and J. M. Synge's 'Deirdre of the Sorrows' (1910).

DOMINIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAHM-ə-nik

Personal note: 01. Dominic Edmond

Rating: 67% based on 36 votes

From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

DONOVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Personal note: 09. Donovan Isaac

Rating: 58% based on 8 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendent of DONNDUBHÁN".

DORIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English)

Personal note: 04. Dorian Harris

The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde probably took it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.

EMMETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-it

Personal note: 0a10. Emmett Alexander

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.

JACKSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK-sən

Personal note: 06. Jackson Rhys

From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).

JULIET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOO-lee-et, JOOL-yət

Personal note: 5. Juliet Adele

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

LESLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LEZ-lee, LES-lee

Personal note: 8. Leslie Sheridan

From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.

MALCOLM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: MAL-kəm

Personal note: 02. Malcolm Elliott

Rating: 57% based on 45 votes

From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.

MORGANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə

Personal note: 1. Morgana Wren

Rating: 70% based on 8 votes

Feminine form of MORGAN (1)

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

Personal note: 03. Nicholas Cain

Rating: 72% based on 57 votes

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

PHAEDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Φαιδρα (Ancient Greek)

Personal note: 7. Phaedra Lily

From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.

RYLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: RIE-lən

Personal note: 05. Rylan Bennett

Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.

SCARLETT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SKAHR-lət

Personal note: 9. Scarlett Genevieve

From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.

VIVIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən (English)

Personal note: 2. Vivian Elise

Rating: 76% based on 12 votes

From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

Personal note: 08. Wesley Hugh

Rating: 62% based on 13 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WINNIFRED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: WIN-i-frid

Personal note: a10. Winnifred Irene

Variant of WINIFRED

WYATT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIE-ət

Personal note: 07. Wyatt Arthur

From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
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