telfalathiel's Personal Name List

ABRAHAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-brə-ham (English), AH-brah-hahm (Dutch)

Personal note: "Bram" or "Abe"

Rating: 56% based on 14 votes

This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). He led his followers from Ur into Canaan, and is regarded by the Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by the Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), the American president during the Civil War.

ABSALOM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְשָׁלוֹם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AB-sə-lahm (English)

Rating: 39% based on 14 votes

From the Hebrew name אַבְשָׁלוֹם ('Avshalom) which meant "my father is peace". In the Old Testament he is a son of King David who leads a revolt against his father. While fleeing on the back of a mule he got his head caught in a tree and was killed by Joab.

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

Personal note: Family name. "Addy" or "Addie"

Rating: 61% based on 14 votes

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

AIDEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: AY-dən

Rating: 41% based on 13 votes

Variant of AIDAN

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Personal note: Family name. "Xan"

Rating: 73% based on 15 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 77% based on 15 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALOYSIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: al-ə-WISH-əs (English), ah-LOI-zee-uws (German), ah-lo-EE-see-us (Dutch)

Personal note: "Wish"

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.

ANNELIESE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: ah-ne-LEE-zə (German), ahn-nə-LEE-sə (Dutch)

Personal note: "Ann" or "Nell"

Rating: 62% based on 12 votes

Combination of ANNA and LIESE

APOLLONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Απολλωνια (Ancient Greek)

Personal note: "Polly"

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

Feminine form of APOLLONIOS. This was the name of an early saint and martyr.

ARTEMISIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια (Ancient Greek)

Personal note: "Tess", "Tessa", "Missy" or "Missi"

Rating: 46% based on 13 votes

Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.

ARWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 42% based on 14 votes

Means "noble maiden" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.

ASHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)

Pronounced: A-shər (English)

Personal note: "Ash"

Rating: 58% based on 12 votes

Means "happy" or "blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob and Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

AURELIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Rating: 38% based on 12 votes

Roman family name which was derived from Latin aureus "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 74% based on 14 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BEAU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BO

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 47% based on 13 votes

Means "beautiful" in French. It has been occasionally used as an American given name since the late 19th century. It appears in Margaret Mitchell's novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) as the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German)

Personal note: "Ben" or "Jamie"

Rating: 64% based on 14 votes

From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BRODY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BRO-dee

Rating: 29% based on 13 votes

From an Irish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ditch" in Gaelic.

CALLUM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: KAL-um

Rating: 58% based on 12 votes

Variant of CALUM

CASPIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)

Rating: 56% based on 12 votes

Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CASSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə (English), kə-SAHN-drə (English), kahs-SAHN-drah (Italian)

Personal note: "Cass"

Rating: 51% based on 14 votes

From the Greek Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), which possibly meant "shining upon man", derived from κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 69% based on 14 votes

French form of CLARA

CONSTANTINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: KAHN-stən-teen (English)

Rating: 70% based on 13 votes

From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).

CORNELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: kawr-NE-lee-ah (German), kor-NE-lyah (Italian), kawr-NAY-lee-ah (Dutch), kər-NEE-lee-ə (English), kər-NEEL-yə (English)

Personal note: "Nell" or "Cora"

Rating: 59% based on 14 votes

Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.

DANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל (Hebrew), Даниел (Macedonian), Դանիէլ (Armenian), დანიელ (Georgian), Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Jewish), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DELILAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)

Personal note: "Della", "Dell" or "Lila"

Rating: 46% based on 13 votes

Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vahrt (Polish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 61% based on 14 votes

Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman conquest. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward. This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings).

EGLANTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: EG-lən-teen

Personal note: "Lettie"

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.

ELISABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: e-LEE-zah-bet (German), e-LEE-sah-bet (Danish), i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

Personal note: Family name. "Betsy" or "Elsa"

Rating: 71% based on 13 votes

German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

Personal note: Family name. "Emma"

Rating: 53% based on 12 votes

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

ENID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Rating: 38% based on 14 votes

Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.

ÉOWYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: AY-ə-win (English)

Rating: 54% based on 12 votes

Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

EUGÉNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-zhay-NEE

Rating: 48% based on 12 votes

French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Personal note: "Evie"

Rating: 57% based on 13 votes

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

FELIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: FE-liks (German), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)

Rating: 65% based on 13 votes

From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FIONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: fee-O-nə

Rating: 64% based on 14 votes

Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).

FRIEDRICH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: FREED-rikh

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 57% based on 13 votes

German form of FREDERICK. This was the name of kings of Germany. The socialist Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) and the philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) are two famous bearers of this name.

GALAHAD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GAL-ə-had (English)

Rating: 35% based on 12 votes

Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legend Sir Galahad was the son of Lancelot and Elaine. He was the most pure of the Knights of the Round Table, and he was the only one to succeed in finding the Holy Grail. He first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

GARETH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GAR-əth (Welsh, English)

Rating: 59% based on 13 votes

Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".

GAVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GAV-in (English)

Rating: 39% based on 13 votes

Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GEORGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 50% based on 14 votes

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GERTRUDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: GUR-trood (English), ger-TROO-də (German), khər-TRUY-də (Dutch)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 38% based on 13 votes

Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).

GISELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English (Modern)

Pronounced: zhee-ZEL (French), ji-ZEL (English)

Rating: 52% based on 13 votes

Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.

GRISELDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature

Pronounced: gri-ZEL-də (English)

Personal note: "Zelda"

Rating: 25% based on 13 votes

Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.

GUINEVERE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir (English)

Personal note: "Gwen"

Rating: 53% based on 13 votes

From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, composed of the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and hwyfar meaning "smooth". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GWENDOLEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)

Personal note: Family name. "Gwen"

Rating: 57% based on 13 votes

Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and dolen "ring". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

HANNELORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: HAH-ne-lo-rə

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 61% based on 12 votes

Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch), HE-le-nah (Finnish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 70% based on 12 votes

Latinate form of HELEN

HENRIETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: hen-ree-ET-ə (English)

Personal note: "Hettie" or "Etta"

Rating: 63% based on 12 votes

English form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 68% based on 12 votes

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HORATIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho

Rating: 49% based on 12 votes

Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.

IGNATIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs (English)

Personal note: "Iggy"

Rating: 49% based on 12 votes

From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.

IMOGEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: IM-ə-jən

Rating: 51% based on 14 votes

The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

ISABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian

Pronounced: ee-zah-BEL-lah (Italian), iz-ə-BEL-ə (English)

Personal note: "Bella"

Rating: 50% based on 12 votes

Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

JACOBINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: yah-ko-BEE-nə (Dutch)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 47% based on 12 votes

Norwegian, Danish and Dutch feminine form of JACOB (or JAMES).

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 69% based on 14 votes

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Rating: 56% based on 14 votes

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JESSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: יִשַׁי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JES-ee (English), YES-sə (Dutch)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 53% based on 12 votes

From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". Jesse is the father of King David in the Old Testament. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer of this name was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

Personal note: Family name. "Sephi"

Rating: 62% based on 14 votes

English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE

JULIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, German

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YUWL-yahn (Polish), YOO-lee-ahn (German)

Rating: 69% based on 14 votes

From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

KARL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: KAHRL (German, Danish, English, Finnish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 49% based on 12 votes

German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.

KATHARINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English), kah-tah-REE-nə (German)

Personal note: Family name. "Kate", "Kitty" or "Kat"

Rating: 49% based on 13 votes

English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).

LEONIDAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεωνιδας (Greek)

Personal note: "Leo"

Rating: 52% based on 12 votes

From Greek λεων (leon) "lion". Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.

LILIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English

Pronounced: lee-LYAH-nah (Italian, Polish), lil-ee-AN-ə (English)

Personal note: "Lily"

Rating: 57% based on 12 votes

Latinate form of LILLIAN

LOGAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: LO-gən

Rating: 32% based on 12 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LORNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: LAWR-nə

Rating: 45% based on 13 votes

Created by the novelist R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869). He may have based it on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title 'Marquis of Lorne' (see LORNE).

LOUISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EEZ (French, English), loo-EE-se (Danish)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 58% based on 13 votes

French feminine form of LOUIS

LUCILLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: loo-SEEL

Personal note: "Lucy"

Rating: 66% based on 12 votes

French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Swedish

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

Personal note: "Maleen"

Rating: 64% based on 12 votes

French form of MAGDALENE

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Personal note: Family name. "Maggie", "Meg", "Greta" or "Gretel"

Rating: 76% based on 13 votes

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English), MAH-teel-dah (Finnish)

Personal note: "Millie", "Tilda" or "Tilly"

Rating: 62% based on 13 votes

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Rating: 50% based on 13 votes

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MINERVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: mi-NUR-və (English)

Personal note: "Minnie"

Rating: 46% based on 12 votes

Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Personal note: "Miri"

Rating: 71% based on 14 votes

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MORGAN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, French

Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English)

Rating: 39% based on 12 votes

From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 65% based on 12 votes

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NIAMH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: NEEV

Rating: 52% based on 13 votes

Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.

NIKOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek

Other Scripts: Νικολας (Greek)

Personal note: Family name. "Nik"

Rating: 43% based on 13 votes

Variant of NICHOLAS or NIKOLAOS

NIMUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay

Personal note: "Nim"

Rating: 48% based on 12 votes

Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

OISÍN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: OSH-een, USH-een

Rating: 40% based on 12 votes

Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 50% based on 12 votes

Modern form of OWAIN

PATRICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, French, German

Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), pat-REEK (French), PAHT-rik (German)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 55% based on 13 votes

From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Personal note: "Nell", "Poppy" or "Penny"

Rating: 64% based on 13 votes

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

QUINN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: KWIN

Rating: 43% based on 13 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendent of CONN".

RÉMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ray-MEE

Rating: 79% based on 12 votes

French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 62% based on 13 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

ROSAMUND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-mund

Personal note: "Rosa", "Rose" or "Rosie"

Rating: 58% based on 13 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

ROSCOE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAHS-ko

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 40% based on 13 votes

From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish), SE-bahs-tee-ahn (Finnish)

Personal note: "Seb" or "Bastian"

Rating: 61% based on 14 votes

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SILAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)

Rating: 57% based on 13 votes

Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel 'Silas Marner' (1861).

SUSANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Personal note: "Sunny", "Suki" or "Sookie"

Rating: 72% based on 13 votes

Form of SUSANNA found in some versions of the Old Testament.

THADDEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs (English)

Rating: 59% based on 13 votes

From Θαδδαιος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεοδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.

TRISTAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, French, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), trees-TAWN (French)

Rating: 67% based on 13 votes

Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". In Celtic legend Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. Instead, Tristan and Isolde end up falling in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

ULRICH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, French, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: UWL-rikh (German)

Personal note: Family name.

Rating: 45% based on 12 votes

From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Personal note: "Lettie"

Rating: 49% based on 13 votes

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIRGIL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: VUR-jəl (English)

Rating: 56% based on 14 votes

From the Roman family name Vergilius which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the 'Aeneid'. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

Personal note: Family name. "Wes"

Rating: 40% based on 14 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Personal note: Family name. "Will" or "Liam"

Rating: 61% based on 15 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WOLFGANG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic, History

Pronounced: VAWLF-gahng (German), WUWLF-gang (English)

Personal note: Family name. "Wolf"

Rating: 56% based on 14 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

WYATT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIE-ət

Rating: 50% based on 13 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.

ZIPPORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə (English), ZIP-ər-ə (English)

Personal note: "Zip", "Zippy" or "Zora"

Rating: 48% based on 13 votes

From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Moses.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.