Paris44's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".

ALEXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Hungarian
Pronounced: ə-LEK-sə (English), AW-lek-saw (Hungarian)
Short form of ALEXANDRA.

ALI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Pashto, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: عليّ (Arabic), علی (Persian, Urdu), علي (Pashto)
Pronounced: ‘a-LEE (Arabic)
Means "lofty, sublime" in Arabic. Ali was a cousin and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad and the fourth caliph to rule the Muslim world. His followers were the original Shia Muslims, who regard him as the first rightful caliph.

This name is borne by the hero in 'Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves', the tale of a man who finds the treasure trove of a band of thieves. Another famous bearer was the boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who changed his name from Cassius Clay upon his conversion to Islam.

ALIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LEEKS
Medieval French variant of ALICE.

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), al-LE-gra (Italian)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ASTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Means "star", ultimately from Greek αστηρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.

AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).

AVALON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lahn
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit which was often linked with paradise.

AVERY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.

AVI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִי (Hebrew)
Means "my father" in Hebrew. It is also a diminutive of AVRAHAM or AVIRAM.

AVIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-VEEV-ah
Feminine variant of AVIV.

AVRIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: A-VREEL (French), AV-ril (English)
French form of APRIL.

BELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEL-ə
Personal note: This is what I am gonna name my future daughter
Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".

BIJOU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Means "jewel" in French.

BLAIR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".

BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEZ
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BLAKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYK
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).

BRANDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-dee
Variant of BRANDY.

BRENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREN-ə
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.

BRENTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREN-tən
From a surname which was derived from an English place name which meant "Bryni's town". Bryni was Old English name meaning "fire".

BRETT
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRET
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).

BRIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
From the English word for the thorny plant.

BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it (English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.

BRÎSKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kurdish
Means "glitter" in Kurdish.

BRITTANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIT-nee, BRIT-ə-nee
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.

BRODY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRO-dee
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.

BUFFY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUF-ee
Diminutive of ELIZABETH, from a child's pronunciation of the final syllable. It is now associated with the main character from the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).

CALISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə (English), ka-LEE-sta (Spanish)
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.

CALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee (English)
Latinized form of KALLIOPE.

CALYPSO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλυψω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIP-so (English)
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.

CAMBRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: KAM-bree-ə (English)
Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.

CAPRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.

CARMELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: kar-ME-la
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.

CASSIDY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAS-i-dee
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".

CEDAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEE-dər
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).

CELESTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: che-LE-ste (Italian), sə-LEST (English)
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.

CHANEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: shə-NEL
From a French surname which meant "pipe". It has been used as an American given name since 1970s, influenced by the Chanel brand name (a line of women's clothing and perfume), which was named for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHER
Short form of CHERYL. In the case of the American musician Cher (1946-), it is short for her real name CHERILYN.

CLARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə (English)
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.

CLARITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLER-i-tee, KLAR-i-tee
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".

CLOVER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of CORINNE.

CYAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIE-an
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).

CYMBELINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SIM-bə-leen (English)
Form of CUNOBELINUS used by Shakespeare in his play 'Cymbeline' (1609).

DAKOTA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.

DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DEER-drə (English), DEER-dree (English), DER-dre (Irish)
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' 'Deirdre' (1907) and J. M. Synge's 'Deirdre of the Sorrows' (1910).

DELIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δηλια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEE-lee-ə (English), DEL-ya (Italian, Spanish)
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.

DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DELTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEL-tə
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.

DESDEMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: dez-də-MON-ə (English)
Derived from Greek δυσδαιμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated". This was the name of the murdered wife of Othello in Shakespeare's play 'Othello' (1603).

DÉSIRÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DE-ZEE-RE
French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".

EDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Variant of AIDAN.

ELECTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ηλεκτρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-LEKT-rə (English)
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.

ELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EL
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".

ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EMERSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ər-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

EMMETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-it
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.

ESSENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ES-ənts
From the English word essence which means either "odour, scent" or else "fundamental quality". Ultimately it derives from Latin esse "to be".

EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EVELYN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EV-ə-lin (English), EEV-lin (British English), EEV-ə-lin (British English), E-və-leen (German)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.

FAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Variant of FAY.

FERENC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: FE-rents
Hungarian form of FRANCIS.

FINN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.

FIZZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: فضّة (Arabic)
Variant transcription of FIDDA.

FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAW-rə (English), FLO-ra (German)
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.

GALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Гала (Russian)
Short form of GALINA.

GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in (English)
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEM-ma (Italian), ZHEM-mə (Catalan), JEM-ə (English), KHE-mah (Dutch)
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.

GENEVIÈVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHU-NU-VYEV, ZHUN-VYEV
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.

GEORGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Pronounced: jor-JEE-nə (English)
Feminine form of GEORGE.

GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEL (French), ji-ZEL (English)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.

GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir (English)
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GWENDOLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and dolen "ring". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

HADLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAD-lee
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.

HAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Variant of HAYLEY.

HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-ee
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.

HONEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HUN-ee
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.

HONOUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AHN-ər
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.

INDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".

INNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Инна (Russian), Інна (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: EEN-nə (Russian)
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Scythian saint and martyr, a male, supposedly a disiciple of Saint Andrew.

IONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ιονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-O-nee (English), IE-o-nee (English), ie-ON (English)
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.

IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch), EE-rees (Finnish, Spanish), EE-REES (French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

IVONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ивона (Serbian, Macedonian)
Form of YVONNE.

IVORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: IE-və-ree, IEV-ree
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance which comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

IXCHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. She was the Mayan goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.

JACINTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-SIN-tah
Latinate form of JACINTHE.

JANESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: jə-NES-ə
Elaborated form of JANE, influenced by VANESSA.

JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lə
Combination of JAY (1) and the popular name suffix la.

JAZMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAZ-min
Variant of JASMINE.

JERICHO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְרֵחוֹ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JER-i-ko (English)
From the name of a city in Israel which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".

JESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JES-ə
Diminutive of JESSICA.

JEZEBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אִיזֶבֶל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEZ-ə-bel (English)
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel) which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.

JOANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON, jo-AN
Variant of JOAN (1).

JODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-dee
Feminine variant of JODY.

JOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Feminine form of JOEL.

JOLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-lee (English), ZHAW-LEE (French)
Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.

JOVE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOV (English)
From Latin Iovis, derived from the stem of Iuppiter (see JUPITER). This was another name of the Roman god Jupiter.

JULIETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUY-LYET
French diminutive of JULIE.

JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JOON-ə-pər
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.

KAI (3)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

KALI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Bengali, Tamil
Other Scripts: काली (Sanskrit), কালী (Bengali), காளி (Tamil)
Pronounced: KAH-lee (English)
Means "the black one" in Sanskrit. The Hindu goddess Kali is the fierce destructive form of the wife of Shiva. She is usually depicted with black skin and four arms, holding a severed head and brandishing a sword. As a personal name, it is generally masculine in India.

KAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.

KEELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".

KELILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: כְּלִילָה (Hebrew)
Means "crown of laurel" in Hebrew.

KENDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-drə
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.

KENZIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-zee
Short form of MACKENZIE.

KOLBY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KOL-bee
Variant of COLBY.

KOURTNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAWRT-nee
Variant of COURTNEY.

KYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lə
Feminine form of KYLE.

KYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-rə, KEE-rə
Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.

LANDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAN-dən
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).

LANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Means "sky, heaven, royal, majesty" in Hawaiian.

LAUREN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.

LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-a (English)
Form of LEAH used in the Greek Old Testament. This is the name of a princess in the 'Star Wars' movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.

LEXI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEKS-ee
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.

LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)
Irish short form of WILLIAM.

LILA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)
Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.

LILIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Лилия (Russian, Bulgarian), Лілія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LYEE-lyi-yə (Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian cognate of LILY.

LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LINDSAY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: LIN-zee (English)
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-).

LIVIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIV-ee-ə
Short form of OLIVIA.

LIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na (Italian)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.

LIVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Czech
Pronounced: LEE-VEE (French)
French and Czech feminine form of LIVIUS.

LIVVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of OLIVIA.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

LYRIC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MADISON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president.

MARGARITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Greek, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Маргарита (Russian, Bulgarian), Μαργαριτα (Greek)
Pronounced: mar-ga-REE-ta (Spanish), mər-gu-RYEE-tə (Russian)
Latinate form of MARGARET. This is also a Latin word meaning "pearl" and a Spanish word meaning "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).

MARILYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MER-ə-lin, MER-lin, MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin
Variant of MARILYN.

MARLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-lin
Variant of MARILYN.

MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

MAYBELLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of MABEL.

MCKENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: mə-KEN-ə
From the Gaelic surname Mac Cionaodha, which means "son of CIONAODH".

MCKENZIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: mə-KEN-zee
Variant of MACKENZIE.

MERCURY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MURK-yə-ree (English)
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system.

MIKA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MEE-kah
Finnish short form of MIKAEL.

MYRTLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-təl
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μυρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.

NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя (Russian, Bulgarian), Надія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA (French), NAD-yə (English), NAHD-yə (English), NA-dyə (Russian)
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).

NICOLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NEE-KAW-LET
Diminutive of NICOLE.

NIKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Νικη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NIE-kee (English), NEE-KE (Classical Greek)
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.

NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай (Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE (Russian)
Variant transcription of NIKOLAY.

NOËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: NAW-EL (French)
Feminine form of NOËL.

NOÉMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NAW-E-MEE
French form of NAOMI (1).

NONA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of NONUS. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.

NORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-ra (German)
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DET
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

OFELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: o-FE-lya
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.

OKSANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Оксана (Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: uk-SA-nə (Russian)
Ukrainian form of XENIA.

ONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ANNA.

PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA (Classical Greek), pan-DAWR-ə (English)
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PANSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAN-zee
From the English word for a type of flower, ultimately deriving from Old French pensee "thought".

PARIS (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: PER-is (English), PAR-is (English)
From the name of the capital city of France, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.

PARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: پریسا (Persian)
Means "like a fairy" in Persian.

PAXTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PAKS-tən
From a surname which was derived from an English place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English name of unknown meaning.

PENNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEN-ee
Diminutive of PENELOPE.

PERPETUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: per-PE-twa (Spanish)
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.

PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PER-SE-PO-NE (Classical Greek), pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PE-tra (German), PET-rah (Finnish), PET-rə (English)
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.

PEYTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYT-ən
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).

PHOENIX
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FEE-niks
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".

PILAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pee-LAR
Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.

PIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PIE-pər
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.

PIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PIP-ə
Diminutive of PHILIPPA.

POLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHL-ee
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.

POMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
From Latin pomus "fruit tree". This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.

PORSCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
From the name of the German car company, which was founded by Ferdinand Porsche (1875-1951). His surname is derived from the given name BORIS.

PORTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearian character.

POSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PO-zee
Diminutive of JOSEPHINE. It can also be inspired by the English word posy for a bunch of flowers.

PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

PRISCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: PRIS-kə (English)
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name which meant "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.

PRIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali
Other Scripts: प्रिया (Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi), பிரியா (Tamil), ప్రియ (Telugu), പ്രിയാ (Malayalam), ಪ್ರಿಯಾ (Kannada), প্রিয়া (Bengali)
Means "beloved" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a daughter of King Daksha.

PRU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PROO
Short form of PRUDENCE.

PRUDENCE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: PROO-dənts (English), PRUY-DAHNS (French)
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.

RAELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAY-lin
Combination of RAE and the popular name suffix lyn.

REAGAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: RAY-gən (English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).

RIKKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIK-ee
Feminine form of RICKY.

RILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

RIO (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 莉央, 莉緒, 里桜, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: REE-O
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are also possible.

RONI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: רוֹנִי (Hebrew)
Means "my joy" or "my song" in Hebrew.

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZET-ta
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).

ROSETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RO-ZET
French diminutive of ROSE.

ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ρωξανη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə (English), rok-SA-na (Spanish)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak) which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).

ROXY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHK-see
Diminutive of ROXANA.

RUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Feminine form of RUNE.

SÄDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SA-de
Means "ray of light" in Finnish.

SAFFRON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".

SAFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: sa-FEE-ra
Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.

SARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Diminutive of SARA. In modern times it may also be a variant of SERENA.

SASCHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ZA-sha
German form of SASHA.

SASSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Swedish diminutive of ASTRID, ALEXANDRA or SARAH.

SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.

SCOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT (American English), SKAWT (British English)
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SERENITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-REN-i-tee
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".

SHAELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SHAY-lin
Combination of SHAE and LYNN.

SHILOH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo (English)
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.

SHOSHANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Hebrew)
Hebrew form of SUSANNA.

SIANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Diminutive of SIÂN.

SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EN-ə
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.

SKYLAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Variant of SKYLER.

STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STEPHANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: STEF-ə-nee (English), SHTE-fa-nee (German)
Feminine form of STEPHEN.

STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
From a Scottish surname which was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".

STORM
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: STAWRM (English)
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.

SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SUZETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SOO-ZET
French diminutive of SUSANNA.

TACEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Derived from Latin tace meaning "be silent". It was in use from the 16th century, though it died out two centuries later.

TALLULAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-LOO-lə
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.

TALON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAL-ən
From the English meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".

TARU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TAH-roo
Means "legend, myth" in Finnish. It is also used as a diminutive of TARJA.

TARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-in
Probably a feminine form of TYRONE. Actors Tyrone Power and Linda Christian created it for their daughter Taryn Power (1953-).

TEAGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.

TESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TES-ə
Diminutive of THERESA.

TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).

TRACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAYS
Short form of TRACY.

TRENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRENT
From a surname which originally denoted someone who lived by the River Trent in England. Trent is also a city in Italy, though the etymology is unrelated.

TREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAY
From an English nickname meaning "three".

TRIXIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIK-see
Diminutive of BEATRIX.

VENA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism
Other Scripts: वेण (Sanskrit)
Derived from Sanskrit वेन (vena) meaning "yearning". This is the name of an evil king in Hindu mythology.

VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VYE-rə (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English), VE-ra (German), VE-rah (Swedish), VE-raw (Hungarian)
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VER-i-tee
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (American English), və-RAWN-i-kə (British English)
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VICTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English), beek-TO-rya (Spanish), vik-TO-rya (German)
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: VYEN
From the French name of the capital city of Austria, known in English as Vienna.

VIMALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil
Other Scripts: விமலா (Tamil)
Feminine form of VIMAL.

VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vi-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYAW-la (Italian), VYO-la (German), VEE-o-law (Hungarian)
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIOLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VYAW-LET
French form of VIOLET.

WILLOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIL-o
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.

XANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KSAHN-dər (Dutch), ZAN-dər (English)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).

XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə (English)
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series 'Xena: Warrior Princess'.

XENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξενια (Greek)
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.

XENON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξενων (Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest".

YESENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
From Jessenia, the genus name of a type of tree found in South America. This name was first used by Yolanda Vargas in the Telenovela 'Yesenia' (1970).

ZALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene
Diminutive of ROZALIJA.

ZANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZAN-dər
Variant of XANDER.

ZANE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.

ZELDA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZEL-də
Short form of GRISELDA.

ZEPHYR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ζεφυρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEF-ər (English)
From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.

ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.

ZOË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English
Pronounced: ZO-ee (English)
Dutch form and English variant of ZOE.

ZORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.