mafiosa's Personal Name List

ABENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-BE-ne
Derived from Basque abe meaning "pillar". It is a Basque equivalent of Pilar.

ADELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-DEL-ə (English), a-DE-la (Polish)
Personal note: ah-DE-lah
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.

ADELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: ə-DEL-ee-ə (English)
Personal note: ah-DEHL-yah
Elaborated form of ADELA.

ADELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, German, Bulgarian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Аделина (Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-de-LEE-na (Italian), a-dhe-LEE-na (Spanish)
Personal note: ah-de-LEE-nah
Latinate diminutive of ADELA.

ADLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַדְלָי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AD-lay (English), AD-lie (English)
Personal note: AD-lay
Contracted form of ADALIA. This is the name of the father of one of King David's herdsmen in the Old Testament.

ADRASTEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αδραστεια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: Adrastia; ah-DRAHS-tee-ah
Feminine form of ADRASTOS. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.

ADRIANUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ah-dree-AH-nus, AH-dree-ah-nus
Personal note: ah-dree-AH-nuws
Official Dutch form of ADRIAN, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.

AGRAFENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аграфена (Russian)
Pronounced: u-gru-FYE-nə
Personal note: ah-grah-FE-nah
Russian form of AGRIPPINA.

AGURNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-GOOR-ne
From Basque agur meaning "greeting, salutation".

AINTZANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: IEN-tsah-ne
Variant of AINTZA.

ALAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-LIE-ah
Means "joyful, happy" in Basque.

ALAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish, Breton, French
Pronounced: A-lən (English), A-LAHN (French)
Personal note: AL-an
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.

This was the name of several dukes of Brittany, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. Famous modern bearers include Alan Shepard (1923-1998), the first American in space and the fifth man to walk on the moon, and Alan Turing (1912-1954), a British mathematician and computer scientist.

ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Personal note: ah-LAH-nah
Feminine form of ALAN.

ALARIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik (English)
Personal note: AL-a-rik
From the Gothic name Alareiks which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler, power". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.

ALASTAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Personal note: AL-as-ter
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.

ALASTRÍONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: al-as-TREE-na
Personal note: al-as-TREE-na
Feminine form of ALASTAR.

ALAZNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-LAHS-ne
Means "miracle" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Milagros.

ALBENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Албена (Bulgarian)
Personal note: ahl-BE-nah
Created by Bulgarian writer Yordan Yovkov for the heroine in his drama 'Albena' (1930). He may have based it on ablen, the name of a type of peony (a flowering plant).

ALBERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Personal note: AL-be-rik
Variant of ALBERICH.

ALEC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ək
Personal note: AL-ek
Short form of ALEXANDER.

ALEIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ah-LIE-dah
Personal note: ah-LEY-dah
Dutch short form of ADELAIDE.

ALEIXO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Galician
Pronounced: ə-LAY-shoo (Portuguese), a-LAY-shaw (Galician)
Personal note: a-LEY-sho
Portuguese and Galician form of ALEXIS.

ALETHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ə-THEE-ə, ə-LEE-thee-ə
Personal note: Alethia; a-le-THEE-a or ah-LEE-thee-ah
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 17th century.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Personal note: al-eg-ZAN-der
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Алексей (Russian), Олексій (Ukrainian), Аляксей (Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY (Russian)
Personal note: ah-lek-SEY
Variant transcription of ALEKSEY.

ALFEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: al-FE-o
Personal note: ahl-FE-o
Italian form of ALPHAEUS.

ALODIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Personal note: a-LO-dee-a
Possibly from a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements alja "other, foreign" and aud "riches, wealth". Saint Alodia was a 9th-century Spanish martyr with her sister Nunilo.

ALOISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: a-lo-EE-zee-a
Personal note: ah-LOYS-yah
German feminine form of ALOYSIUS.

ALONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַלוֹנָה (Hebrew)
Personal note: ah-LO-nah
Feminine form of ALON.

ALONDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-LON-dra
Personal note: ah-LON-drah
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".

ALONSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-LON-so
Personal note: ah-LON-so
Spanish variant of ALFONSO.

ALTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλθαια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ahl-THE-ah
From the Greek name Αλθαια (Althaia), perhaps related to Greek αλθος (althos) "healing". In Greek myth she was the mother of Meleager. Soon after her son was born she was told that he would die as soon as a piece of wood that was burning on her fire was fully consumed. She immediately extinguished the piece of wood and sealed it in a chest, but in a fit of rage many years later she took it out and set it alight, thereby killing her son.

ÁLVARO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: AL-ba-ro (Spanish)
Personal note: AHL-bah-ro
Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps ALFHER. Verdi used this name in his opera 'The Force of Destiny' (1862).

ALYONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алёна (Russian)
Personal note: Aljona; ahl-YO-nah
Originally a Russian diminutive of YELENA. It is now used independently.

AMADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-MA-dha
Personal note: ah-MAH-dah
Feminine form of AMADO.

AMALRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AM-əl-rik (English), ə-MAL-rik (English)
Personal note: AM-al-rik
Germanic name derived from the elements amal meaning "work, labour" and ric meaning "power". This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Visigoths, as well as two 12th-century rulers of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.

AMANCIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: a-MAN-thyo (European Spanish), a-MAN-syo (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: ah-MAHNTH-yo
Spanish and Portuguese form of AMANTIUS.

AMANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MAHN-DEEN
Personal note: ah-mahn-DEEN
French diminutive of AMANDA.

AMARANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Personal note: ah-mah-RAHN-tah
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.

AMBROSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αμβροσια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ahm-bro-SEE-ah
Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).

AMIR (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: أمير (Arabic), امیر (Persian, Urdu)
Personal note: AH-meer
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.

ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə (English), AN-na (Italian, Polish, Icelandic), A-na (German, Greek), AHN-nah (Dutch, Norwegian, Finnish), AN-nah (Danish), AWN-naw (Hungarian), AN-nə (Russian, Catalan)
Personal note: AH-nah
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ανθεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-thee-ə (English)
Personal note: Anthia; ahn-THEE-ah
From the Greek Ανθεια (Antheia), derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.

ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee (American English), AN-tə-nee (British English)
Personal note: AN-to-nee
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ANTÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: an-TEE-a
Personal note: an-TEE-a
Galician feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).

ANTONIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch
Pronounced: an-TO-nee-oos (Classical Latin), an-TO-nee-əs (English), ahn-TO-nee-us (Dutch)
Personal note: ahn-TOHN-yuws
Ancient Roman form of ANTHONY. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Anton or Antoon in daily life.

ANTONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-tə-nee
Personal note: AN-to-nee
Variant of ANTHONY. This was formerly the usual English spelling of the name, but during the 17th century the h began to be added.

ARANTXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-RAHN-chah
Diminutive of ARANTZAZU.

ARANTZAZU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ah-RAHN-tsah-soo
From the name of a place near the Spanish town of Oñati where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Its name is derived from Basque arantza "thornbush".

ARES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αρης (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-RES (Classical Greek), ER-eez (English)
Personal note: AH-res
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) "male". Ares was the blood-thirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.

ARGIÑE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ahr-GEEN-ye
Feminine form of ARGI.

ARIADNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Ариадна (Russian)
Pronounced: a-RYAD-na (Spanish, Polish)
Personal note: ah-ree-AHD-nah
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.

ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NE (Classical Greek), ar-ee-AD-nee (English)
Personal note: ah-ree-AHD-ne or ar-ee-AD-nee
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.

ARMIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Personal note: ahr-MEE-dah
Probably created by the 16th-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580). In the poem Armida is a beautiful enchantress who bewitches many of the crusaders.

ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αστραια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ahs-TRE-ah
Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.

ASUNCIÓN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-soon-THYON (European Spanish), a-soon-SYON (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: ah-soonth-YON
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.

ATHANARIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Personal note: a-THA-na-rik
From the Gothic name Athanareiks, derived from the Germanic element athana meaning "year" combined with ric meaning "power, ruler". Athanaric was a 4th-century ruler of the Visigoths.

ATHANASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αθανασια (Greek)
Personal note: ah-thah-nah-SEE-ah
Feminine form of Athanasios (see ATHANASIUS).

ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TE-NA (Classical Greek), ə-THEE-nə (English)
Personal note: ah-THEE-nah
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATHENAIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αθηναις (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ah-thee-nah-EES
Ancient Greek personal name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ATHENA.

ATTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Personal note: AT-i-kus
From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).

AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-RE-lya (Italian, Polish)
Personal note: ow-REHL-yah
Feminine form of AURELIUS.

AURELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: ow-REHL-yuws
Roman family name which was derived from Latin aureus "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.

BARRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: BAR-a
Variant of BAIRRE.

BARTHOLOMEW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo (English)
Personal note: bahr-THOL-e-myoo
From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.

BARTOLOMÉ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: bar-to-lo-ME
Personal note: bahr-to-lo-ME
Spanish form of BARTHOLOMEW.

BETHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)
Personal note: BETH-a-nee
From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BIDANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: bee-DAH-ne
Means "way" in Basque.

BONNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAHN-ee
Personal note: BON-ee
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.

BRENDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-dən (English)
Personal note: BREN-dan
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.

CADOGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Irish
Personal note: KAD-o-gan
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.

CAETANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Personal note: kah-e-TAH-no
Portuguese form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).

CAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קָיִן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAYN (English)
Personal note: KAYN
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.

CAIRBRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KAHR-bra
Personal note: KAR-bra
Means "charioteer" in Gaelic.

CAITRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KAT-ree-a
Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA.

CAITRÍONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: kə-TRYEE-nə
Personal note: ka-TREE-nah
Irish form of KATHERINE.

CAIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: KAH-yuws
Roman variant of GAIUS.

CALBHACH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAL-ə-wəkh
Personal note: KAL-va [?]
Means "bald" in Irish Gaelic.

CALVAGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KAL-va
Anglicized form of CALBHACH.

CAOLÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KAY-lan
From Gaelic caol "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.

CARBREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KAHR-bree
Personal note: KAHR-bree
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.

CARBRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KAHR-bree
Personal note: KAHR-bree
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.

CARDEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Personal note: kahr-DE-ah
Derived from Latin cardo meaning "hinge, axis". This was the name of the Roman goddess of thresholds, door pivots, and change.

CAREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KER-ee
Personal note: CAR-ee
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".

CARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: KAR-ləs
Personal note: KAHR-les
Catalan form of CHARLES.

CARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KER-ee
Personal note: KAR-ee
Variant of CAREY.

CATALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ta-LEE-na
Personal note: kah-tah-LEE-nah
Spanish form of KATHERINE.

CATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na (Galician)
Personal note: kah-tah-REE-nah
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.

CATERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: ka-te-REE-na (Italian), kə-tə-REE-nə (Catalan)
Personal note: kah-te-REE-nah
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.

CATHÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KAYN [?]
Derived from Gaelic cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix.

CATHARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: kah-tah-REE-nah (Dutch)
Personal note: kah-tah-REE-nah
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.

CATHERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kath-ə-REE-nə, kə-THREE-nə
Personal note: kah-te-REE-nah
Variant of KATHERINE.

CATHRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ka-TREEN
Personal note: KAHT-reen
German short form of KATHARINA.

CATINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Personal note: kah-TEE-nah
Contracted form of CĂTĂLINA.

CATO (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: KAH-to or KAY-to
Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.

CATRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, German
Pronounced: KAT-rin (Welsh), ka-TREEN (German)
Personal note: KAHT-reen
Welsh form of KATHERINE, as well as a German short form of KATHARINA.

CAYETANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kie-e-TA-no
Personal note: kah-ye-TAH-no
Spanish form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).

CÉSAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: SE-ZAR (French), THE-sar (European Spanish), SE-sar (Latin American Spanish), SE-zur (European Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese)
Personal note: SE-sahr
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).

CESARE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: CHE-za-re
Personal note: che-SAH-re
Italian form of CAESAR.

CHRISTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS-chən (English), KRISH-chən (English), KREES-TYAHN (French), KRIS-tyan (German), KRIS-tee-ahn (Swedish)
Personal note: KRIST-yahn
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.

CIANÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KEEN-an
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.

CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Personal note: KEER-an
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

COLUMBINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAHL-əm-bien
Personal note: KOL-um-bien
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.

CONLETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KON-lee [?]
Modern form of the old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "chaste fire" from Gaelic connla "chaste" and aodh "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.

CONLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KON-lee
Anglicized form of CONLETH.

CONSTANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAHN-stənts (English), KAWNS-TAHNS (French)
Personal note: KON-stans
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).

CONSTANTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Personal note: kon-stan-TEE-nah
Feminine form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).

CONSTANTINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: KAWNS-tən-teen (English)
Personal note: KON-stan-teen
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).

CORMAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: KOR-mak
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.

CURRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: KOO-ro
Andalusian diminutive of FRANCISCO.

DACIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: da-CHYAN-a
Personal note: dahs-YAH-nah [?]
Derived from Dacia, the old Roman name for the region which is now Romania and Moldova.

DÁIRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DAW-ra (Irish)
Personal note: DAR-a
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish Gaelic. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAF-nee (English), DAHF-nə (Dutch)
Personal note: DAHF-ne or DAF-nee
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.

DARA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: DAR-a
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.

DARAGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: DAR-a
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.

DARRAGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: DAR-a
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.

DAVETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Personal note: DAV-eth
Cornish form of DAVID.

DAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: dah-VEEN-yah
Variant of DAVINA.

DECIMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: DE-kee-moos
Personal note: DE-tsi-muws
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "tenth" in Latin.

DELORIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: də-LAWR-is
Personal note: de-LOR-is
Variant of DOLORES.

DESIDERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Personal note: de-see-DER-yah
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.

DESIDERIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Personal note: de-see-DER-yo
Italian and Spanish form of DESIDERIUS.

DESPINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Δεσποινα (Greek), Деспина (Macedonian)
Pronounced: DHE-spee-na (Greek)
Personal note: DES-pee-nah
Modern Greek and Macedonian form of DESPOINA.

DIEGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: DYE-gho
Personal note: DYE-go
Possibly a shortened form of SANTIAGO. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχη (didache) "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).

DOMENICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Personal note: do-ME-nee-ko
Italian form of DOMINIC. Domenico Veneziano was a Renaissance painter who lived in Florence.

DOMINGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: do-MEENG-ga
Personal note: do-MING-gah
Spanish feminine form of DOMINIC.

DOMINGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: do-MEENG-go
Personal note: do-MING-go
Spanish form of DOMINIC.

DONATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Lithuanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: do-NA-ta (Italian)
Personal note: do-NAH-tah
Feminine form of Donatus (see DONATO).

DYMPHNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: DIMF-na
Personal note: DIMF-na
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who was martyred by her father. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.

ÉANNA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Personal note: AY-na
Variant of ÉNNA.

EDERNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: e-DER-ne
Feminine variant of EDER (2).

EDURNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: e-DOOR-ne
Feminine form of EDUR.

EFISIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: e-FEE-zyo
Personal note: e-FEES-yo
From the Latin byname Ephesius, which originally belonged to a person who was from the city of Ephesus in Ionia. This was the name of a saint martyred on Sardinia in the 4th century.

EGUZKIÑE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: e-GOOS-keen-ye
Feminine form of EGUZKI.

EKAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: E-kien
Means "June (the month)" in Basque.

ELAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-LAYN (English)
Personal note: i-LAYN
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation 'Le Morte d'Arthur' Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859).

ELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Елена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), Ελενα (Greek)
Pronounced: E-le-na (Italian, German), e-LE-na (Spanish), yi-LYE-nə (Russian), i-LYE-nə (Russian)
Personal note: EL-e-nah
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.

ELISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Finnish, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-za (Italian, German), E-lee-sah (Finnish)
Personal note: e-LEE-sah
Short form of ELISABETH.

ELISEO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: e-lee-ZE-o (Italian), e-lee-SE-o (Spanish)
Personal note: Elisea; e-lee-SE-ah
Italian and Spanish form of ELISHA.

ELISSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Personal note: e-LI-sah
Meaning unknown (possibly Phoenician in origin). This is another name of Dido, the legendary queen of Carthage.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)
Personal note: e-LIZ-a-beth
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. It has also been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶלְקָן (Hebrew)
Personal note: EL-kahn
Modern variant of ELKANAH.

ELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-ə
Personal note: EL-a
Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element alja meaning "other". It was introduced to England by the Normans and used until the 14th century, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the American singer Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996).

ÉMERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EM-REEK
Personal note: EM-e-rik
French form of EMMERICH.

ENCARNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: en-KAR-na
Personal note: en-KAHR-nah
Short form of ENCARNACIÓN.

ENRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: ən-REEK
Personal note: EN-rik
Catalan form of HENRY.

ÉRICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Personal note: E-ree-ko
Portuguese form of ERIC.

ERLEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: er-LE-ah
Means "a bee" in Basque.

ERNESTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Personal note: er-NES-to
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ERNEST.

EROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ερως (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: E-RAWS (Classical Greek), ER-aws (English)
Personal note: E-ros
Means "love" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was a young god, the son of Aphrodite, who was armed with arrows that caused the victim to fall in love.

ERRAMUN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: e-RAH-moon
Basque form of RAYMOND.

ESKARNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: es-KAHR-ne
Means "mercy" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Mercedes.

ESTEBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: es-TE-ban
Personal note: es-TE-bahn
Spanish form of STEPHEN.

ESTEBE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: es-TE-be
Basque form of STEPHEN.

ESTEVO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician
Personal note: es-TE-vo
Galician form of STEPHEN.

ESTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ES-tee
Means "sweet, honey" in Basque.

ESTIÑNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: Estiñe; es-TEEN-ye
Variant of ESTI.

EUKENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: e-oo-KE-ne
Basque form of EUGENIA.

EUNOMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευνομια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ev-no-MEE-ah
Means "good order" in Greek, ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and νομος (nomos) "law, custom". Eunomia was a Greek goddess, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai), presiding over law.

EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Ευφημια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEM-ee-ə (English)
Personal note: ev-fe-MEE-ah
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.

EUTHALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ευθαλια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ev-thah-LEE-ah
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word ευθαλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and θαλλω (thallo) "to blossom".

EVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Ευα (Greek), Ева (Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)
Pronounced: E-ba (Spanish), E-va (Italian, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic), EE-və (English), E-fa (German), AY-vah (Dutch), E-vah (Danish), YE-və (Russian), E-wa (Classical Latin)
Personal note: E-fah
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευαδνη (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: e-VAD-nee or e-VAHD-ne
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), which is of unknown meaning, though the first element is derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.

EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)
Personal note: ee-VAN-der
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
Personal note: EEV
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EVELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: e-VEHL-yah
Elaborated form of EVA.

EZTEBE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: es-TE-be
Basque form of STEPHEN.

FABIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, History
Pronounced: FA-byan (German, Polish), FAH-bee-ahn (Dutch), FAY-bee-ən (English)
Personal note: FAH-bee-ahn
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.

FABIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: fa-BYO-la (Italian, Spanish)
Personal note: fahb-YO-lah
Diminutive of FABIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome.

FÁELÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish
Personal note: FAY-lawn
Older form of FAOLÁN.

FAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Фаина (Russian)
Pronounced: fu-EE-nə
Personal note: fah-EE-nah
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from PHAENNA.

FALK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FALK
Personal note: FAHLK
Means "falcon" in German.

FANTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Personal note: fan-TEEN
This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). The name was given to her by a passerby who found the young orphan on the street. Hugo may have intended it to be a derivative of the French word enfant "child".

FAOLÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FWAY-lahn
Personal note: FAY-lawn
Means "little wolf", derived from Gaelic fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.

FELICITAS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: fe-LEE-tsee-tas (German)
Personal note: fe-LEE-tsi-tahs
Latin name which meant "good luck, fortune". In Roman mythology the goddess Felicitas was the personification of good luck. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a slave martyred with her master Perpetua in Carthage.

FELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Personal note: fe-LEE-nah
Feminine form of FELINUS.

FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FE-liks (German, Swedish), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)
Personal note: FE-liks
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FEMKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Frisian
Pronounced: FEM-kə (Dutch)
Personal note: FEM-ke
Diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element frid "peace". It also coincides with a Frisian word meaning "little girl".

FERN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FURN
Personal note: FURN
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.

FERNANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fer-NAN-do (Spanish)
Personal note: fer-NAHN-do
Spanish and Portuguese form of FERDINAND.

FERRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Personal note: FER-an
Catalan form of FERDINAND.

FIDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Personal note: fee-DEHL-yah
Feminine form of FIDEL.

FIDELIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Personal note: fee-DE-lis
Original form of FIDEL.

FIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: fee-E-ra
Personal note: fee-E-rah or FEE-rah
Means "proud" in Esperanto.

FILOMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch
Pronounced: fee-lo-ME-na (Italian)
Personal note: fi-lo-ME-nah
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch form of PHILOMENA.

FINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: FEE-na
Personal note: FEE-nah
Short form of SERAFINA. Saint Fina, also known as Saint Serafina, was a 13th-century girl from the town of San Gimignano in Italy.

FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya (Italian), FLA-bya (Spanish)
Personal note: FLAH-vee-ah
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.

FLAVIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Personal note: FLAY-vee-an
From the Roman family name Flavianus, which was derived from FLAVIUS. This was the name of several early saints including a 5th-century patriarch of Constantinople who was beaten to death.

FLORENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Personal note: flo-ren-TEE-nah
Feminine form of FLORENTINUS.

FLORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, French
Pronounced: FLO-ryan (German), FLAW-ryan (Polish), FLAW-RYAHN (French)
Personal note: FLO-ree-ahn
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.

FOLKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: FOL-ke (Swedish)
Personal note: FOL-ke
Short form of various Old Norse names that contain the element folk meaning "people", and thus a cognate of FULK.

FORTUNATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Personal note: for-too-NAH-tah
Feminine form of FORTUNATO.

FRANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Personal note: FRAHNG-kah
Contracted form of FRANCESCA.

FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə (English), FRE-ya (German)
Personal note: FRIE-ah
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FRIEDRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FREE-drikh
Personal note: FREED-rikh
German form of FREDERICK. This was the name of kings of Germany. The socialist Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) and the philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) are two famous bearers of this name.

GAËL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GA-EL (French)
Personal note: Gael; gah-EL
Meaning uncertain. It possibly derives from the ethno-linguistic term Gael, which refers to speakers of Gaelic languages. Alternatively it may be a variant of GWENAËL.

GERARDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: je-RAR-do (Italian), khe-RAR-dho (Spanish)
Personal note: khe-RAHR-do
Italian and Spanish form of GERARD.

GERRARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: je-RAHRD
Variant of GERARD.

GHISLAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHEES-LEN, GEE-LEN
Personal note: gis-LAYN
Feminine form of GHISLAIN.

GIACOMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-ko-mo
Personal note: JAH-ko-mo
Italian form of Iacomus (see JAMES).

GIOACCHINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-ak-KEE-no
Personal note: jo-ah-KEE-no
Italian form of JOACHIM.

GIOACHINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-a-KEE-no
Personal note: jo-ah-KEE-no
Italian form of JOACHIM. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).

GOIZANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: goy-SAH-ne
Derived from Basque goiz "morning".

HAIZEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ie-SE-ah
Means "wind" in Basque.

HIRUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-ROO-ne
Means "trinity" in Basque, derived from hiru meaning "three".

IDONEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Personal note: i-do-NE-ah
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century.

IGONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-GO-ne
Feminine form of IGON. It is a Basque equivalent of Ascensión.

IRATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-RAH-tee
Means "fern field" in Basque.

IRUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-ROO-ne
Variant of HIRUNE.

ISTVÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: EESHT-van
Personal note: isht-VAHN
Hungarian form of STEPHEN. This was the name of the first king of Hungary. Ruling in the 11th century, he encouraged the spread of Christianity among his subjects and is considered the patron saint of Hungary.

ITSASNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-CHAHS-ne
Variant of ITSASO.

ITSASO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-CHAH-so
Means "ocean" in Basque.

ITXARO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-CHAH-ro
Means "hope" in Basque.

ITXASO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: ee-CHAH-so
Diminutive of ITSASO.

IVANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ивана (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Personal note: ee-VAH-nah
Feminine form of IVAN.

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
Personal note: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

IZAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: EE-sahr
Means "star" in Basque.

JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Personal note: JAK
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JACKIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-ee
Personal note: NN, JAK-ee
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.

JAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָעֵל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-əl (English), JAYL (English)
Personal note: jah-EL
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.

JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)
Personal note: JAYMZ
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Personal note: JAYN
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JANINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Lithuanian
Pronounced: ya-NYEE-na (Polish), YAH-nee-nah (Finnish), ya-NEE-na (German)
Personal note: yah-NEE-nah
Latinate form of JEANNINE.

JENARO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khe-NA-ro
Personal note: khe-NAH-ro
Spanish form of JANUARIUS.

JOSUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: yo-SOO-ne
Feminine form of JOSU.

JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия (Russian), Юлія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lya (German, Polish), YOO-lee-ah (Swedish, Danish, Finnish), KHOO-lya (Spanish), YOO-lyi-yə (Russian), YOO-lee-a (Classical Latin)
Personal note: JOO-lee-ah
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: KHOO-lyo
Personal note: KHOOL-yo
Spanish form of JULIUS.

JULIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German
Pronounced: YOO-lee-oos (Classical Latin), JOO-lee-əs (English), YOO-lyuws (German)
Personal note: JOO-lee-us
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

KADRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Pronounced: KAHD-rree
Personal note: KAHD-ree
Estonian form of KATHERINE.

KALYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Калина (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: kah-LI-nah
Personal note: kah-LEE-nah
From the Ukrainian word for a type of shrub, also called the guelder rose.

KATALIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Basque
Pronounced: KAW-taw-leen (Hungarian)
Personal note: kah-TAH-leen or kah-tah-LEEN
Hungarian and Basque form of KATHERINE.

KATARIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Personal note: kah-tah-REEN
Breton form of KATHERINE.

KATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Катарина (Serbian)
Pronounced: kah-tah-REE-nah (Swedish), ka-ta-REE-na (German)
Personal note: kah-tah-REE-nah
Cognate of KATHERINE.

KATELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Personal note: KAH-tel
Breton form of KATHERINE.

KATERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian, Russian, Bulgarian, Greek, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Катерина (Macedonian, Russian, Bulgarian), Κατερινα (Greek)
Pronounced: kə-tyi-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Personal note: kah-te-REE-nah
Macedonian form of KATHERINE, a Russian short form of YEKATERINA, a Bulgarian short form of EKATERINA, and a Greek variant of AIKATERINE.

KATERYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Катерина (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: kah-te-RI-nah
Personal note: kah-te-REE-nah
Ukrainian form of KATHERINE.

KATHARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na (German), kah-tah-REE-nah (Swedish)
Personal note: kah-tah-REE-nah
German form of KATHERINE.

KATHERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German
Pronounced: kath-ə-REE-nə (English), kə-THREE-nə (English), ka-te-REE-na (German)
Personal note: kah-te-REE-nah
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).

KATHRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ka-TREEN
Personal note: KAHT-reen
German short form of KATHARINA.

KATINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: ka-TING-ka (German), KAW-teeng-kaw (Hungarian)
Personal note: kah-TING-kah
German diminutive of KATHARINA, a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN and a Dutch diminutive of CATHARINA.

KATJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Slovene
Pronounced: KAT-ya (German), KAHT-yah (Dutch)
Personal note: KAHT-yah
Form of KATYA.

KATRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Estonian
Pronounced: ka-TREEN (German), kah-TREEN (Swedish)
Personal note: KAHT-reen
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.

KATRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: kə-TREE-nə (English), kaht-REE-nah (Dutch)
Personal note: kat-REE-na or kah-TREE-nah
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.

KERRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KER-ee
Personal note: KER-ee
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".

KETURAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə (English), kee-TYOOR-ə (English)
Personal note: ke-TOO-rah
Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.

KRISTJANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Personal note: krist-YAH-nah
Icelandic form of CHRISTINA.

LAELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LIE-lee-a
Personal note: LIE-lee-ah
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.

LAETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, French
Pronounced: LE-TEE-SYA (French)
Personal note: le-TEETS-yah
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.

LÁILÁ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sami
Personal note: LIE-lah
Sami variant form of HELGA.

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Personal note: LIE-lah
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Personal note: LEY-lah
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LEITH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: Laith; LAYTH
From a surname, originally from the name of a Scottish town (now a district of Edinburgh), which is derived from Gaelic lìte "wet, damp". It is also the name of the river that flows though Edinburgh.

LELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Personal note: LE-lee-ah
Italian form of LAELIA.

LENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Personal note: le-NOR-a
Short form of ELENORA.

LENORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-NAWR
Personal note: le-NOR
Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).

LETICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: le-TEE-thya (European Spanish), le-TEE-sya (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: le-TEES-yah
Spanish form of LETITIA.

LEYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Azerbaijani, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian)
Personal note: LEY-lah
Variant of LEILA.

LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)
Personal note: LEE-am
Irish short form of WILLIAM.

LIBITINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Personal note: li-bee-TEE-nah
Meaning unknown. Libitina was the Roman goddess of funerals, corpses and death.

LÍGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Personal note: Ligia; LEEKH-yah
Portuguese form of LIGEIA.

LIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na (Italian)
Personal note: li-vee-AH-nah
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.

LORE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: LO-re
Means "flower" in Basque.

LOREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: lo-RE-ah
Variant of LORE (2).

LORENA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian
Personal note: lo-RE-nah
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE.

LUCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Personal note: LOO-kan
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.

LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan (Romanian), LOO-shən (English)
Personal note: LOO-see-an
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUCIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: loo-CHA-no (Italian), loo-THYA-no (European Spanish), loo-SYA-no (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: loos-YAH-no or loo-CHAH-no; NN Ciano, CHAH-no
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LUCIANUS.

LUMINIȚA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: loo-mee-NEE-tsa
Personal note: loo-mee-NEE-tsah
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.

MADGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAJ
Personal note: MAJ
Diminutive of MARGARET.

MAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: MA-EL (French)
Personal note: mah-EL
French feminine form of MAËL.

MAËLYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-E-LEES
Personal note: mah-E-lis
Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MAIALEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: mah-YAH-len or mah-yah-LEHN
Basque form of MAGDALENE.

MAITE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: MIE-te
Means "lovable" in Basque.

MALAIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ملائكة (Arabic)
Pronounced: ma-LIE-ka
Personal note: mah-LIE-kah
Means "angels" from the plural of Arabic ملك (malak).

MARC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Catalan, Welsh
Pronounced: MARK (French, Catalan)
Personal note: MAHRK
French, Catalan and Welsh form of MARK.

MARCUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MAR-koos (Classical Latin), MAHR-kəs (English)
Personal note: MAHR-kuws
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.

MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Personal note: MAHR-grit
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARIAMNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Personal note: mah-ree-AHM-ne
From Μαριαμη (Mariame), the form of MARIA used by the historian Josephus when referring to the wife of King Herod.

MARICRUZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: mah-ree-KROOTH or mah-ree-KROOS
Contraction of MARÍA and CRUZ.

MARILENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: ma-ree-LE-na (Italian)
Personal note: mah-ree-LE-nah
Combination of MARIA and ELENA.

MARISOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: mar-ee-SOL
Personal note: mah-ree-SOL
Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".

MARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)
Pronounced: MAHRK (English), MARK (Russian)
Personal note: MAHRK
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Icelandic, Latvian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Марта (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მართა (Georgian)
Pronounced: MAR-ta (Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German), MAR-tu (Portuguese), MAR-tə (Catalan)
Personal note: MAHR-tah
Cognate of MARTHA.

MARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)
Personal note: MAR-ee
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the mother of Jesus. According to the gospels, Jesus was conceived in her by the Holy Spirit while she remained a virgin. This name was also borne by Mary Magdalene, a woman cured of demons by Jesus. She became one of his followers and later witnessed his crucifixion and resurrection.

Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name is Mary Poppins from the children's books by P. L. Travers, first published in 1934.

MATTHIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ματθιας (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ma-TEE-as (German), MA-TYAS (French), mə-THIE-əs (English), MAT-tee-as (Classical Latin)
Personal note: mah-TEE-ahs
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.

MÁXIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: MAK-see-ma
Personal note: MAHK-see-mah
Spanish feminine form of MAXIMUS.

MAXIMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: MAHK-see-muws
Roman family name which was derived from Latin maximus "greatest". Saint Maximus was a monk and theologian from Constantinople in the 7th century.

MAYTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵיטַל (Hebrew)
Personal note: MIE-tahl
Variant transcription of MEITAL.

MENACHEM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מְנַחֵם (Hebrew)
Personal note: ME-nah-khem
Hebrew form of MENAHEM.

MERAV
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵרַב (Hebrew)
Personal note: ME-rahv
Hebrew form of MERAB (1).

MICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-kha-el (German), MEE-kah-el (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
Personal note: MI-khah-ehl; NN Micha, MI-khah
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MIGUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: mee-GHEL (Spanish), mee-GEL (Portuguese)
Personal note: mee-GEL
Spanish and Portuguese form of MICHAEL. A notable bearer of this name was Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616), the Spanish novelist and poet who wrote 'Don Quixote'.

MIREIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: mee-RE-yə (Catalan)
Personal note: mee-REY-ah
Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).

MIRELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Albanian
Personal note: mee-RE-lah
Romanian, Croatian and Albanian form of MIREILLE.

MIREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: MEE-ren
Basque form of MARIA.

MITXEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: MI-chel
Basque form of MICHAEL.

MONTSERRAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: moon-sə-RAT
Personal note: mont-se-RAHT
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".

NADEJDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Надежда (Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də (Russian)
Personal note: nah-DEZH-dah
Variant transcription of NADEZHDA.

NADĚŽDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Personal note: nahd-YEZH-dah
Czech form of NADEZHDA.

NAGORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: NAH-go-re
From the name of a Basque village where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

NAHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: NIE-ah
Means "desire" in Basque.

NAILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نائلة (Arabic)
Personal note: NIE-lah
Feminine form of NAIL. This was the name of the wife of Uthman, the third caliph of the Muslims. She tried in vain to prevent a mob from murdering her husband, and had several fingers cut off in the process.

NAOMHÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Personal note: NEEV-an
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.

NAWAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نوال (Arabic)
Personal note: nah-WAHL
Means "gift" in Arabic.

NEFERTARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nef-ər-TAHR-ee (English)
Personal note: nef-er-TAHR-ee
From Egyptian Nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.

NEKANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ne-KAH-ne
Personal note: ne-KAH-ne
Means "sorrows" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Dolores.

NEPHELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νεφελη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NE-PE-LE (Classical Greek), NEF-el-ee (English)
Personal note: ne-FE-lee
From Greek νεφος (nephos) meaning "cloud". In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.

NERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: NE-re
Means "mine" in Basque.

NERO (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: NIR-o (English)
Personal note: NE-ro
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigourous". It was borne most infamously by a tyrannical Roman emperor of the 1st century.

NEVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: NEV-an
Personal note: NEV-an
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.

NEVENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Невена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Personal note: ne-VE-nah
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".

NIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: NYE-ve
Variant of NIEVES.

NIEVES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NYE-bes
Personal note: NYE-ves
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".

NIZHONI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Navajo
Personal note: nee-ZHO-nee
Means "beautiful" in Navajo.

NORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-ra (German)
Personal note: NOR-a
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: awk-TAY-vee-ə (English), ok-TA-bya (Spanish), ok-TA-wee-a (Classical Latin)
Personal note: ok-TAH-vee-ah or ok-TAY-vee-a
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

OIHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: oy-AH-nah
Means "forest" in Basque.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)
Personal note: o-FEHL-yah
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

OSANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: O-sah-ne
Means "cure, remedy" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Remedios.

PETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər (English), PE-tu (German), PAY-tər (Dutch), PE-tər (Danish, Slovene), PE-ter (Slovak)
Personal note: PEE-ter
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century.

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PHAEDRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φαιδρος (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: FEED-rus
Latinized form of the Greek name Φαιδρος (Phaidros), which meant "bright". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, and also of a 1st-century Roman fabulist who was originally a slave from Thrace.

PHERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Personal note: FE-rik
Manx form of PATRICK.

PHINEAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: פִּינְחָס (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: FIN-ee-əs (English)
Personal note: FIN-ee-as
Variant of PHINEHAS used in some versions of the Bible.

PHOTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φωτινη (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: fo-tee-NEE
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)). This is the name traditionally given to the Samaritan woman Jesus met at the well (see John 4:7). She is venerated as a saint by the Eastern Church.

PHOTIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φωτιος (Greek)
Personal note: FO-tee-os
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)).

RAFAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Рафаел (Macedonian)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (Spanish), RA-fa-el (German)
Personal note: RAH-fah-el
Form of RAPHAEL.

REGULUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: REG-yu-lus or RE-goo-luws
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.

REMEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: rə-MAY
Personal note: re-MEY
Means "remedy" in Catalan, a Catalan equivalent of REMEDIOS.

ROCÍO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-THEE-o (European Spanish), ro-SEE-o (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: ro-THEE-o
Means "dew" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Rocío meaning "Mary of the Dew".

ROMAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RAW-MEN
Personal note: ro-MAYN
French form of Romanus (see ROMAN).

ROMAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: RAW-MEN (French), ro-MAYN (English)
Personal note: ro-MAYN
French feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Personal note: ro-MAHN
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

ROMANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RAW-MAN
Personal note: ro-MAHN
French feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).

ROMANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-MA-no
Personal note: ro-MAH-no
Italian form of Romanus (see ROMAN).

ROMEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Personal note: RO-me-o or RO-mee-o
Italian form of the Late Latin name Romaeus meaning "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

ROSEMARIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: RO-zə-ma-ree (German)
Personal note: ROZ-ma-ree
Variant of ROSEMARY.

ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree
Personal note: ROZ-ma-ree
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ρωξανη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə (English), rok-SA-na (Spanish)
Personal note: rok-SAH-nah
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak) which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).

RUFUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Pronounced: ROO-fəs (English)
Personal note: ROO-fuws
Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.

SAFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: sa-FEE-ra
Personal note: sah-FEE-rah
Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.

SALOMÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: SA-LAW-ME (French), sə-loo-ME (Portuguese)
Personal note: SAH-lo-me
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of SALOME.

SANTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: san-TEE-no
Personal note: sahn-TEE-no
Diminutive of SANTO.

SANTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: SAN-to
Personal note: SAHN-to
Means "saint" in Italian, ultimately from Latin sanctus.

SANTOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: SAN-tos
Personal note: SAHN-tos
Means "saints" in Spanish.

SARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Personal note: sah-REE-nah
Diminutive of SARA. In modern times it may also be a variant of SERENA.

SAWNEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Personal note: SAW-nee
Scottish form of SANDY.

SCHOLASTICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Personal note: sko-LAHS-ti-kah
From a Late Latin name which was derived from scholasticus meaning "rhetorician, orator". Saint Scholastica was a 6th-century Benedictine abbess, the sister of Saint Benedict of Nursia.

SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Σεληνη (Greek)
Pronounced: SE-LE-NE (Classical Greek), si-LEE-nee (English)
Personal note: se-LEEN
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.

SENDOA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: sen-DO-ah
Means "strong" in Basque.

SERAFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: se-ra-FEE-na (Polish)
Personal note: se-rah-FEE-nah
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.

SHEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: SHEE-nə
Personal note: SHEE-na
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).

SOLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LEN
Personal note: so-LEN
Variant of SOLANGE.

SOLVEIG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: SOOL-vie (Norwegian), SOOL-vay (Swedish)
Personal note: SOOL-vie
From an Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play 'Peer Gynt' (1876).

SONJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Соња (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ZAWN-ya (German), SON-yah (Finnish)
Personal note: ZON-yah
Form of SONYA.

SORINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Personal note: so-REE-nah
Feminine form of SORIN.

SORLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish
Pronounced: SAWR-lee
Personal note: SOR-lee
Anglicized form of SOMHAIRLE.

SORNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: SOR-ne
Means "conception" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Concepción.

STAMATIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σταματια (Greek)
Personal note: stah-MAHT-yah
Feminine form of STAMATIOS.

STEVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: STEE-vən (English), STAY-vən (Dutch)
Personal note: STEEV-en
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.

SVEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: SVE-ah
Personal note: SVE-ah
From a personification of the country of Sweden, in use since the 17th century. It is a derivative of Svear, the Swedish name for the ancient Germanic tribe the Swedes. The Swedish name of the country of Sweden is Sverige, a newer form of Svear rike meaning "the realm of the Svear".

TACITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: tah-SEE-tah or tah-THEE-tah
Feminine form of TACITUS.

TACITO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Pronounced: ta-CHEE-to (Italian), ta-THEE-to (European Spanish), ta-SEE-to (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: tah-SEE-to
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of TACITUS.

TALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Թալին (Armenian)
Personal note: tah-LEEN
Variant transcription of TALIN.

TARIQ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: طارق (Arabic)
Personal note: TAH-rik
Means "he who knocks at the door" in Arabic. This is the Arabic name of the morning star. Tariq ibn Ziyad was the Islamic general who conquered Spain for the Umayyad Caliphate in the 8th century.

TASKILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Personal note: TAS-kil
Anglicized form of TASGALL.

TATJANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, German, Latvian, Lithuanian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Татјана (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: TAH-tyah-nah (Finnish)
Personal note: taht-YAH-nah
Form of TATIANA.

TEMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: תֵּימָן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TEE-mən (English)
Personal note: te-MAHN
Means "right hand" or "south" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a grandson of Esau for whom the town of Teman in Edom was named.

TERCERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ter-THE-ro (European Spanish), ter-SE-ro (Latin American Spanish)
Personal note: ter-THE-ro
Means "third" in Spanish. This name was traditionally given to the third child born.

TERTIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: TER-tee-oos (Classical Latin), TUR-shəs (English)
Personal note: TER-tee-uws
This was both a Roman praenomen and a cognomen which meant "third" in Latin.

THEODORIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: thee-AHD-ə-rik (English)
Personal note: thee-OD-o-rik
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "power, ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.

THEOPHANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοφανια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: the-o-FAHN-yah
Feminine form of THEOPHANES.

THEOPHILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοφιλα (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: the-o-FEE-lah
Feminine form of THEOPHILUS.

TISIPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τισιφονη (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: ti-SIF-o-nee or ti-see-FO-nee
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τισις (tisis) "vengeance" and φονη (phone) "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.

TORNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Personal note: TOR-nee
From the Old Norse name Þórný which was derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with "new".

TRAIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Personal note: TRAH-yahn [?]
Romanian form of Traianus (see TRAJAN).

TRYPHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Τρυφαινα (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: TREE-fe-nah
From the Greek name Τρυφαινα (Tryphaina), derived from Greek τρυφη (tryphe) meaning "softness, delicacy". This name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament.

TXOMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: CHO-meen
Basque form of DOMINIC.

UDANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: oo-DAH-ne
Derived from Basque uda meaning "summer".

UNAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: OO-nie
Means "cowherd" in Basque.

VALERIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Russian, Ukrainian, Georgian, Romanian
Other Scripts: Валериан (Russian), Валеріан (Ukrainian), ვალერიან (Georgian)
Pronounced: və-LIR-ee-ən (English)
Personal note: val-ER-ee-an
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name VALERIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.

VALERIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: vah-le-ree-AH-nah
Feminine form of Valerianus (see VALERIAN).

VALERIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: wa-LE-ree-oos (Classical Latin), və-LER-ee-əs (English)
Personal note: vah-LE-ree-uws
Roman family name which was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.

VALKYRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: VAL-ki-ree (English)
Personal note: VAL-ki-ree
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.

VARINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Personal note: vah-RIN-yah
Feminine form of VARINIUS.

VARINIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: vah-RIN-yuws
Roman family name possibly derived from VARIUS.

VARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal note: VAH-ree-uws
Roman family name which meant "versatile" in Latin. Varius Rufus was a Roman epic poet of the 1st century BC.

VEIT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FIET
Personal note: FIET
German form of VITUS or WIDO.

VILKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Personal note: VIL-ko
Slovene and Croatian diminutive of WILLIAM.

VINICIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Personal note: vee-NEES-yo
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman family name Vinicius, which was possibly derived from Latin vinum "wine".

VIORICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Personal note: vee-O-ri-ka [?]
Derived from Romanian viorea meaning "bluebell".

XABIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque, Galician
Pronounced: sha-bee-ER
Personal note: shah-bee-ER; NN Xabi, SHAH-bee
Basque and Galician form of XAVIER.

YAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יָעֵל (Hebrew)
Personal note: yah-EL
Hebrew form of JAEL.

ZENOBIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDE-NO-BEE-A (Classical Greek), zə-NO-bee-ə (English)
Personal note: zi-no-VEE-ah
Means "life of Zeus", derived from Greek Ζηνο (Zeno), a prefix form of the name of ZEUS, combined with βιος (bios) "life". This was the name of a 3rd-century queen of Palmyra. After claiming the title 'Queen of the East' and expanding her realm into Roman territory she was defeated by emperor Aurelian.

ZERU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: SE-roo
Means "sky" in Basque.

ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Personal note: ZIN-ee-a
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.

ZORIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: so-ree-O-ne
Feminine form of ZORION.

ZULAYKHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زليخا (Arabic)
Personal note: zoo-LIE-khah
Arabic form of ZULEIKA.

ZULEIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: zoo-LAY-kə (English)
Personal note: zoo-LEY-kah
Possibly means "brilliant beauty" in Persian. According to medieval legends this was the name of Potiphar's wife in the Bible. She has been a frequent subject of poems and tales.

ZURIÑE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Personal note: soo-REEN-ye
Derived from Basque zuri "white".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.