italiannames's Personal Name List

ADAMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-DA-mo
Italian form of ADAM.

ADELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Italian, Finnish
Pronounced: a-DE-lə (German), ə-DEL (English), a-DE-le (Italian), AH-de-le (Finnish)
Form of ADÈLE.

ADINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲדִינָא (Ancient Hebrew), Αδινα (Ancient Greek), עֲדִינָה (Hebrew)
From Hebrew עֲדִינָא ('adina') meaning "slender, delicate". This name is borne by a soldier in the Old Testament. It is also used in modern Hebrew as a feminine name, typically spelled עֲדִינָה.

ADRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AYD-ree-ə
Short form of ADRIANA.

ADRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, English, Dutch
Pronounced: ad-RYA-na (Italian), adh-RYA-na (Spanish), a-DRYA-na (Polish), ayd-ree-AN-ə (English)
Feminine form of ADRIAN.

ADRIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: ad-RYA-no (Italian)
Italian and Portuguese form of ADRIAN.

ALDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWL-dən
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.

ALESSANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-les-SAN-dro
Italian form of ALEXANDER. A famous bearer was Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), the Italian physicist who invented the battery.

ALESSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian feminine form of ALEXIS.

ALEXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Hungarian
Pronounced: ə-LEK-sə (English), AW-lek-saw (Hungarian)
Short form of ALEXANDRA.

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), al-LE-gra (Italian)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

ALLEGRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Elaborated form of ALLEGRA.

ALYCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-yə, ə-LIS-ə, ə-LISH-ə
Variant of ALICIA.

ANACLETO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: a-na-KLE-to (Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ANACLETUS.

ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασια (Greek), Анастасия (Russian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə (Russian), a-nə-STAY-zhə (English), a-nə-STAS-yə (English), a-nas-TA-sya (Spanish), a-nas-TA-zya (Italian), A-NA-STA-SEE-A (Classical Greek)
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

ANGELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ангелина (Russian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: an-je-LEE-na (Italian), an-jə-LEEN-ə (English), un-gyi-LYEE-nə (Russian), an-ge-LEE-na (Polish)
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).

ANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-ZHU-LEEN, AHN-ZHLEEN
French diminutive of ANGELA.

ANGELINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Diminutive of ANGELO or ÁNGEL.

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ARA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian, Armenian Mythology
Other Scripts: Արա (Armenian)
Meaning unknown, possibly of Sumerian origin. In Armenian legend this was the name of an Armenian king who was so handsome that the Assyrian queen Semiramis went to war to capture him. During the war Ara was slain.

ARCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ahr-KAY-dee-ə (English)
Feminine form of ARCADIUS. This is the name of a region on the Greek Peloponnese, long idealized for its natural beauty.

ARCADIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αρκαδιος (Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of ARKADIOS.

ARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Арина (Russian)
Russian variant of IRINA.

ASH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH
Personal note: Mine!
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.

ASHTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH-tən
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.

ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TE-NA (Classical Greek), ə-THEE-nə (English)
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology
Pronounced: AH-tən (English)
Means "solar disk" in Egyptian. Aton was an Egyptian god of the sun, depicted as a solar disk with long rays extending downwards. The worship of Aton was especially extensive during the reign of the pharaoh Akhenaton, who proclaimed Aton was the only god.

AUREL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: ow-REL (German)
German, Romanian, Czech and Slovak form of AURELIUS.

AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-RE-lya (Italian, Polish)
Feminine form of AURELIUS.

AURÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-RE-LEE
French feminine form of AURELIUS.

AVRIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: A-VREEL (French), AV-ril (English)
French form of APRIL.

AXEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Pronounced: A-ksəl (German)
Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM.

BELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEL
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.

BIANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka (Italian), BYAN-ka (Romanian)
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).

BLAIR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".

BRENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRENT
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".

CAMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: ka-MEL-ya
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).

CAMERON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".

CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CAMILLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of CAMILLUS.

CAMILLUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kə-MIL-əs (English)
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.

CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English), ka-ro-LEE-nə (German)
French feminine form of CAROLUS.

CELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: SEEL-yə (English), SEE-lee-ə (English), THE-lya (European Spanish), SE-lya (Latin American Spanish)
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.

CÉLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-LEEN
French feminine form of CAELINUS. This name can also function as a short form of MARCELINE.

CHRIS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: KRIS (English), KRHIS (Dutch)
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.

CIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KYEE-ən (Irish)
Means "ancient" in Gaelic. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.

CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLER
French form of CLARA.

CLÉMENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLE-MAHN-TEEN
French feminine form of CLEMENT.

COLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.

COLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-LET
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).

CONSTANTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Feminine form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).

CONSTANTINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: KAWNS-tən-teen (English)
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).

DEMETRIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δημητριος (Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημητριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess DEMETER (1). Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.

DEVIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: देविका (Hindi)
Means "little goddess" from Sanskrit देवी (devi) meaning "goddess" and (ka) meaning "little".

DIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: die-AN-ə
Variant of DIANA.

DIMITRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, French
Other Scripts: Димитрий (Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-MYEE-tryee (Russian), DEE-MEE-TREE (French)
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.

DREW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DROO
Short form of ANDREW.

ELIANA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶלִיעַנָה (Hebrew)
Means "my God has answered" in Hebrew.

ELIORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)
Feminine form of ELIOR.

ELISABETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: e-lee-za-BET-ta
Italian form of ELIZABETH.

ELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EL
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".

ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LAW-DEE
French form of ALODIA.

ELYSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. It was popularized in the early 1980s by a character from the television comedy 'Family Ties'.

EMILIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: e-MEE-lyo (Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMLYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).

ESMÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EZ-may (English), EZ-mee (English), es-MAY (Dutch)
Feminine form of ESMÉ.

EUDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευδωρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-DAWR-ə (English)
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements ευ (eu) "good" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.

EUGENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευγενεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-JE-nya (Italian), ew-KHE-nya (Spanish), ew-GE-nya (Polish), yoo-JEE-nee-ə (English), yoo-JEEN-yə (English)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.

EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

FAITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAYTH
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

FARRAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: فرح (Arabic)
Variant transcription of FARAH.

FAUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FOW-na (Classical Latin), FAWN-ə (English)
Feminine form of FAUNUS. Fauna was a Roman goddess of fertility, women and healing, a daughter and companion of Faunus.

FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FE-liks (German, Swedish), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FILIPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Feminine form of PHILIP.

FLORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Italian feminine form of FLORIAN.

GARDENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: gahr-DEEN-yə
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).

GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEM-ma (Italian), ZHEM-mə (Catalan), JEM-ə (English), KHE-mah (Dutch)
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.

GEORGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Pronounced: jor-JEE-nə (English)
Feminine form of GEORGE.

GIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Personal note: It's so cute
Diminutive of GIANNA.

GINEVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEV-ra
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".

GIORGINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jor-JEE-no
Diminutive of GIORGIO.

GIULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-LYA-na
Feminine form of GIULIANO.

GIULIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-LYET-ta
Diminutive of GIULIA.

GİZEM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "mystery" in Turkish.

GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT (English)
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.

GRAY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAY
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.

GWENDOLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)
Variant of GWENDOLEN.

HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HE-le-na (German), he-LE-nah (Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), khe-LE-na (Polish), HE-le-nah (Finnish), HEL-ə-nə (English)
Latinate form of HELEN.

HELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: he-LEN (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), he-LE-nə (German), HE-LE-NE (Classical Greek)
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.

HOLDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HOL-dən
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.

HOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOP
Personal note: My favorite word.
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.

INDIGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
Personal note: Only for a boy though!
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".

INDIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Sanskrit), इन्दिरा, इंदिरा (Hindi), इंदिरा (Marathi), ಇಂದಿರಾ (Kannada), இந்திரா (Tamil)
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

INDRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: इन्द्र (Sanskrit, Nepali), इन्द्र, इंद्र (Hindi)
Pronounced: IN-drə (English)
Means "possessing drops of rain" from Sanskrit इन्दु (indu) meaning "a drop" and (ra) meaning "acquiring, possessing". Indra is the name of the ancient Hindu warrior god of the sky and rain. He is the chief god in the Hindu text the Rigveda.

INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: ING-rid (Swedish), ING-ree (Norwegian), ING-grit (German), ING-greet (German)
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).

ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: IE-lə
Personal note: Sounds pretty :)
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

JANETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAN-ət, jə-NET
Variant of JANET.

JANINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHA-NEEN (French), jə-NEEN (English), ya-NEE-nə (German)
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.

JEAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAHN
French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The French philosophers Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Jean Paul Sartre (1905-1980) were two well-known bearers of this name. It was also borne by the German-French Dadaist artist Jean Arp (1886-1966).

JEAN (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: JEEN
Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.

JONAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə (English)
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YOO-lyan (Polish, German)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-AH-nah (Dutch), yoo-LYA-na (German), joo-lee-AHN-ə (English), khoo-LYA-na (Spanish)
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

JULIETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUY-LYET
French diminutive of JULIE.

JUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOON
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

JUNO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: YOO-no (Classical Latin), JOO-no (English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.

KARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of CARA.

KATHERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German
Pronounced: kath-ə-REE-nə (English), kə-THREE-nə (English), ka-te-REE-na (German)
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).

KATRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Estonian
Pronounced: ka-TREEN (German), kah-TREEN (Swedish)
Personal note: A combo I like is Zola Katrin
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.

KATRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: kə-TREE-nə (English), kaht-REE-nah (Dutch)
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.

KATYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)
Pronounced: KA-tyə
Diminutive of YEKATERINA.

KENDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-drə
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.

LAKE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAYK
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.

LÁRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: LOW-rah
Icelandic form of LAURA.

LIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.

LIBERTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIB-ər-tee
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).

LINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لينا (Arabic)
Means either "palm tree" or "tender" in Arabic.

LIV (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LEEV
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".

LIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na (Italian)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.

LIVIANUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Latin masculine form of LIVIANA.

LIVIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman family name which may be related to either Latin liveo "to envy" or lividus "blue, envious". Titus Livius, also known as Livy, was a Roman historian who wrote a history of the city of Rome.

LOGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən (English)
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LUCIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEN
French form of LUCIANUS.

LUCINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-SEEN-ə (English)
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.

LUCINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Լուսինե (Armenian)
Variant transcription of LUSINE.

LUIGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Diminutive of LUIGIA.

LUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: LWEE-sa (Spanish), LWEE-za (Italian)
Feminine form of LUIS.

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

MAGNOLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mag-NO-lee-ə
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na (Italian, Spanish, German), mə-REEN-ə (English), mu-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Feminine form of MARINUS.

MARTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-TEE-na (German, Italian, Spanish), mər-TEE-nə (Catalan), mahr-TEEN-ə (English), mahr-TEE-nah (Dutch)
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.

MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English), MAH-teel-dah (Finnish)
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MATRONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Матрона (Russian)
Pronounced: mu-TRO-nə (Russian)
Means "lady" in Late Latin. This was the name of three early saints.

MATTEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TE-o
Italian form of MATTHEW.

MAXIMILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MAXIMILIANUS.

MILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Мила (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Міла (Ukrainian)
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".

MILANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Russian, Czech
Other Scripts: Милана (Serbian, Russian)
Variant of MILENA.

MILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.

MONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: MO-nə (English)
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").

NADYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя (Russian, Bulgarian), Надія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-dyə (Russian)
Diminutive of NADEZHDA.

NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλια (Greek), ნატალია (Georgian), Наталия (Russian), Наталія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya (Polish, Italian, Spanish)
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).

NESSA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Means "miracle" in Hebrew.

NICCOLÒ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: neek-ko-LO
Italian form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.

NICOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Feminine diminutive of NICOLA (1).

NILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIELZ
From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.

NINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Нина (Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: NYEE-nə (Russian), NEE-na (Italian, German), NEE-nə (English), NEE-NA (French), NEE-nah (Finnish), NYEE-na (Polish)
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".

NOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lan
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.

OCEAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-shən
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.

OCÉANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SE-AN
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".

OCEANUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ωκεανος (Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of OKEANOS.

OCTAVIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Romanian
Pronounced: awk-TAY-vee-ən (English)
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name OCTAVIUS. After Gaius Octavius (later Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.

ODESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.

OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AWL-ə-vər (English), O-lee-vu (German), O-lee-ver (Finnish)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

ORA (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Personal note: Nice and pretty
Perhaps based on Latin oro "to pray". It was first used in America in the 19th century.

ORVILLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWR-vil
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.

PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA (Classical Greek), pan-DAWR-ə (English)
Personal note: Sounds nice as a name.
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German
Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), PA-TREEK (French), PA-trik (German)
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAULINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Swedish, Lithuanian, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: pow-LEE-na (Spanish, Polish), paw-LEEN-ə (English)
Feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).

PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PE-tra (German), PET-rah (Finnish), PET-rə (English)
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.

QUINN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KWIN
Personal note: My 2nd favorite unisex name.
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".

RACHELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-chəl, rə-SHEL
Variant of RACHEL influenced by the spelling of ROCHELLE.

RITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: REET-ə (English), REE-ta (German), REE-taw (Hungarian)
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).

RIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

ROBERTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Feminine diminutive of ROBERTO.

ROSALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: ro-za-LEE-a (Italian)
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAWZ-ə-lien, ROZ-ə-leen
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

RYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: RIE-ən (English)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

SANTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: san-TEE-no
Diminutive of SANTO.

SARITA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Other Scripts: सरिता (Hindi, Marathi, Nepali)
Means "flowing" in Sanskrit.

SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.

SEDNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.

SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Σεληνη (Greek)
Pronounced: SE-LE-NE (Classical Greek), si-LEE-nee (English)
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SÉRAPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-RA-FEEN
French form of SERAPHINA.

SHYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of SHEILA.

SÖREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, German
Pronounced: SUU-ren (Swedish), ZUU-rən (German)
Personal note: Interesting and sweet,
Swedish and German form of SØREN.

TARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-ə, TER-ə, TAR-ə
Personal note: A very nice clean name.
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place" in Gaelic. This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.

TARO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 太郎, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TA-RO
Variant transcription of TAROU.

TATIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιανα (Greek), ტატიანა (Georgian), Татьяна (Russian), Татяна (Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na (Italian, Spanish, Polish), TAH-tee-ah-nah (Finnish), ta-tee-AN-ə (English), ta-TYAN-ə (English), tu-TYA-nə (Russian)
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.

TERTIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: TER-tee-oos (Classical Latin), TUR-shəs (English)
This was both a Roman praenomen and a cognomen which meant "third" in Latin.

TITANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tə-TAYN-yə (English), tə-TAHN-yə (English), tie-TAYN-yə (English)
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595) where it is the name of queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.

TORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRA.

TWILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TWIE-lə
Meaning unknown. Perhaps based on the English word twilight, or maybe from a Cajun pronunciation of French étoile "star". It came into use as an American given name in the late 19th century.

URBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical, History
Pronounced: OOR-ban (Polish), UR-bən (English)
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.

URBANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: oor-BA-na
Italian feminine form of URBAN.

VALENCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ba-LEN-sya (Latin American Spanish), ba-LEN-thya (European Spanish), və-LEN-see-ə (English)
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".

VALENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина (Russian, Macedonian), Βαλεντινα (Greek)
Pronounced: va-len-TEE-na (Italian), və-lyin-TYEE-nə (Russian)
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.

VALENTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-len-TEE-no
Italian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).

VALERIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: wa-LE-ree-oos (Classical Latin), və-LER-ee-əs (English)
Roman family name which was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.

VALERIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Валерия (Russian), Валерія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: vu-LYE-ryi-yə (Russian)
Russian and Ukrainian feminine form of VALERIUS.

VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VYE-rə (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English), VE-ra (German), VE-rah (Swedish), VE-raw (Hungarian)
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VESNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Весна (Serbian, Macedonian)
Means "messenger" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic spirit associated with the springtime. In many Slavic languages this is now the poetic word for "spring". It has been used as a given name only since the 20th century.

VIOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта (Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LET-ta (Italian), vyi-u-LYET-tə (Russian), VEE-o-let-taw (Hungarian)
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of VIOLET.

VITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Danish
Feminine form of VITUS.

WINONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Native American, Sioux
Pronounced: wi-NON-ə (English)
Means "firstborn daughter" in the Dakota language. This was the name of the daughter of the Sioux Dakota chief Wapasha III.

XIOMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Possibly a Spanish form of GUIOMAR.

YOANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Йоана (Bulgarian)
Bulgarian feminine form of JOHN.

ZENON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Polish
Other Scripts: Ζηνων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDE-NAWN (Classical Greek), ZE-nawn (Polish)
Older form of ZENO, as well as the modern Polish form.

ZENOVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Greek)
Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA.

ZOLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZO-lə
Personal note: I wanna give this name to a daughter!
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name. It has been in occasional use in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. It coincides with an Italian surname, a famous bearer being the French-Italian author Émile Zola (1840-1902).

ZYTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZI-ta
Possibly a Polish form of ZITA (1), or possibly a short form of FELICYTA.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.