Camilla's Personal Name List

ABRAHAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-brə-ham (English), AH-brah-hahm (Dutch)

Rating: 54% based on 32 votes

This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). He led his followers from Ur into Canaan, and is regarded by the Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by the Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), the American president during the Civil War.

ADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian

Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)

Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), AHD-ryahn (Polish), AH-dree-ahn (German), ah-dree-AHN (Russian)

Rating: 65% based on 34 votes

Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

ALASTRÍONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: al-as-TREE-na

Personal note: al-as-TREE-na

Rating: 49% based on 34 votes

Feminine form of ALASTAR

ALBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Slovene, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic

Other Scripts: Альберт (Russian)

Pronounced: AL-bərt (English), al-BER (French), AHL-bert (German, Polish), AHL-bərt (Dutch)

Rating: 54% based on 30 votes

From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelbeorht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.

This name was borne by two 20th-century kings of Belgium. Other famous bearers include the German physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), creator of the theory of relativity, and Albert Camus (1913-1960), a French-Algerian writer and philosopher.

ALBY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 32% based on 17 votes

Anglicized masculine form of AILBHE

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 84% based on 34 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German, Romanian), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Portuguese), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Brazilian Portuguese)

Rating: 69% based on 34 votes

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALFRED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch

Pronounced: AL-frəd (English), al-FRED (French), AHL-fret (German, Polish), AHL-frət (Dutch)

Rating: 46% based on 27 votes

Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in the northeast of England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century. A famous bearer was the British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).

ALMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: AL-mə (English)

Rating: 41% based on 28 votes

This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".

ALOISIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: ah-lo-EE-zee-ah

Rating: 32% based on 9 votes

German feminine form of ALOYSIUS

ALVILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Rating: 17% based on 7 votes

Danish form of ALFHILD

ALVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-vin

Rating: 36% based on 25 votes

From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.

ALWILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: History

Rating: 26% based on 23 votes

Latinized form of ALFHILD. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.

AMANDINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: a-mawn-DEEN

Rating: 37% based on 23 votes

French diminutive of AMANDA

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

Rating: 49% based on 16 votes

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

ANDREW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: AN-droo (English)

Rating: 62% based on 24 votes

From the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος (andros) "of a man"). In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANNE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque

Pronounced: AHN (French), AN (English), AH-nə (German), AHN-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 24 votes

French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ANSEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-səl

Personal note: AN-səl

Rating: 38% based on 24 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).

ANSHEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Yiddish

Other Scripts: אַנְשֶׁעל (Yiddish)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Yiddish diminutive of ASHER

ANTHONY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-thə-nee, AN-tə-nee

Rating: 54% based on 25 votes

English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARKADIY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Аркадий (Russian)

Pronounced: ahr-KAH-dee

Personal note: ahr-KAH-dee

Rating: 34% based on 22 votes

Russian form of ARKADIOS

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 58% based on 23 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ARVO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 28% based on 20 votes

Means "value, worth" in Finnish.

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 22 votes

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

ASTRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French

Pronounced: AH-strid (Swedish), AH-stree (Norwegian), AHS-trit (German)

Rating: 61% based on 21 votes

Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.

ATHENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 59% based on 23 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 58% based on 24 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AUGUSTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian

Pronounced: o-goos-TEN (French)

Personal note: o-goos-TEN

Rating: 40% based on 22 votes

French, Czech, Romanian and Croatian form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).

AUGUSTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-gəs-teen, ə-GUS-tin

Personal note: AW-gəs-teen, ə-GUS-tin / from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 46% based on 22 votes

From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.

AVIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ah-VEEV-ah

Personal note: ah-VEEV-ah

Rating: 39% based on 23 votes

Feminine variant of AVIV

BEATRIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: BEE-ə-triks (English), BE-ah-triks (German), BAY-ah-triks (Dutch)

Rating: 57% based on 23 votes

Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian. In England it became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit.

BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German)

Rating: 67% based on 22 votes

From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BERIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 30% based on 21 votes

Variant of BIRGIT

BERNADETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ber-na-DET (French)

Rating: 45% based on 21 votes

French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.

BONNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BAHN-ee

Rating: 44% based on 23 votes

Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.

BRENDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: BREN-dən (English)

Rating: 48% based on 22 votes

From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.

BRONWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: BRAHN-wen

Rating: 54% based on 22 votes

Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".

BRYNJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian

Pronounced: BRIN-yah (Icelandic)

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

Means "armour" in Old Norse.

CAROL (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KER-əl, KAR-əl

Rating: 30% based on 22 votes

Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".

CAROLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: ka-ro-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 59% based on 15 votes

French feminine form of CAROLUS

CASIMIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: KAZ-i-meer (English)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 55% based on 22 votes

English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kazic "to destroy" combined with mer "great" or mir "peace". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.

CATHERINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-tə-REEN (French), ka-TREEN (French), KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English)

Rating: 73% based on 23 votes

French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.

CECILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, German

Pronounced: sə-SEE-lee-ə (English), sə-SEEL-yə (English), che-CHEE-lyah (Italian), the-THEE-lyah (Spanish), se-SEE-lyah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 73% based on 24 votes

Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CHARITON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Χαριτων (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 13% based on 6 votes

Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.

CHARLES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: CHAHR-əlz (English), SHAHRL (French)

Rating: 64% based on 22 votes

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word which meant "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. It was subsequently borne by several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was carried by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CHRISTOPHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər

Rating: 60% based on 21 votes

From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. In Denmark it was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's 'Winnie-the-Pooh' books.

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 68% based on 24 votes

French form of CLARA

CORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 23 votes

Created by James Fenimore Cooper for his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). He may have based it on KORË or CORINNA.

CORENTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Breton, French

Rating: 37% based on 20 votes

Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.

CORINNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κοριννα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-REEN-ə (English), kə-RIN-ə (English), ko-RI-nah (German)

Personal note: kə-RIN-ə

Rating: 44% based on 23 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.

CORINNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ko-REEN (French), kə-REEN (English), kə-RIN (English)

Personal note: kə-RIN

Rating: 46% based on 22 votes

French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).

DANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל (Hebrew), Даниел (Macedonian), Դանիէլ (Armenian), დანიელ (Georgian), Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Jewish), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish)

Rating: 60% based on 21 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DANIELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Polish, Czech, Romanian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, English

Pronounced: dahn-YE-lah (German, Polish)

Rating: 48% based on 12 votes

Feminine form of DANIEL

DAVINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: də-VEEN-ə

Rating: 43% based on 21 votes

Feminine form of DAVID. It originated in Scotland.

DERVAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 23% based on 20 votes

Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE

DERVILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 19% based on 13 votes

Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE

DERVLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 18% based on 13 votes

Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE

DETLEF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German

Pronounced: DET-lef

Personal note: DET-lef

Rating: 24% based on 21 votes

Low German name meaning "people heritage", derived from the Germanic elements þeud "people" and leib "heritage".

DEVNET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: DEV-net

Personal note: DEV-net

Rating: 21% based on 20 votes

Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT

DMITRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Дмитрий (Russian)

Pronounced: DMEE-tree

Personal note: DMEE-tree

Rating: 48% based on 20 votes

Variant transcription of DMITRIY

DONNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAHN-ə

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 29% based on 20 votes

From Italian donna meaning "lady". It is also used as a feminine form of DONALD.

DORIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 54% based on 20 votes

The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde probably took it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.

DOROTHEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek

Other Scripts: Δωροθεα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: do-ro-TE-ah (German), dawr-ə-THEE-ə (English)

Personal note: dawr-ə-THEE-ə

Rating: 60% based on 22 votes

Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god". Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.

DOROTHY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee

Rating: 58% based on 21 votes

Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz' (1900).

EDITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: EE-dith (English), E-dit (German)

Rating: 51% based on 21 votes

From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "rich, blessed" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyð, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.

EDMOND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 69% based on 23 votes

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEANORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: el-ə-NAWR-ə

Rating: 65% based on 23 votes

Latinate form of ELEANOR

ELENI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ελενη (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEN-ee

Personal note: e-LEN-ee

Rating: 62% based on 12 votes

Variant transcription of ELENE

ELEONORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Croatian

Pronounced: e-le-o-NO-rah (German), e-le-aw-NAW-rah (Polish)

Personal note: e-le-o-NO-rah / from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 62% based on 24 votes

Cognate of ELEANOR

ELFREDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 24% based on 19 votes

From the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength" from the element ælf combined with þryð "strength". Ælfþryð was a 10th-century queen of England. This name was rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.

ELIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Feminine form of ELIOR

ELIPHELET

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱלִיפֶלֶט (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIF-ə-let (English), ee-LIF-ə-let (English)

Personal note: i-LIF-ə-let

Rating: 23% based on 19 votes

Means "God is release" in Hebrew. This is the name of several people in the Old Testament including a son of David.

ELIZABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

Rating: 77% based on 24 votes

From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLEN (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ən

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 44% based on 19 votes

Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.

ELOWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Cornish

Rating: 40% based on 6 votes

Derived from Cornish elew "elm tree". This is a recently coined Cornish name.

EMILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ə-lee

Rating: 52% based on 14 votes

English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Bronte (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

Rating: 65% based on 22 votes

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

ENNI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 22% based on 19 votes

Feminine form of EINO

ENNIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: EN-nyo

Rating: 20% based on 19 votes

Italian form of the Roman family name Ennius which is of unknown meaning. Quintus Ennius was an early Roman poet.

ENVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 31% based on 9 votes

Means "radiance" in Turkish.

ENZO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, French

Rating: 35% based on 20 votes

The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of HEINZ, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name ANZO. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as VINCENZO or LORENZO.

EPHRAIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶפְרָיִם (Hebrew), Εφραιμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-free-im (English), EE-frəm (English), E-free-im (English), E-frəm (English)

Personal note: eh-frah-eem

Rating: 49% based on 20 votes

From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) which meant "fruitful". In the Old Testament, Ephraim is a son of Joseph and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

ÉTIENNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ay-TYEN (French), ay-TSYEN (Quebec French)

Personal note: ay-TYEN

Rating: 52% based on 21 votes

French form of STEPHEN

EVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: EV-ən (English)

Rating: 52% based on 12 votes

Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

EVREN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 28% based on 5 votes

Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish.

FELIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: FE-liks (German), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)

Rating: 62% based on 23 votes

From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FLAVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: FLAH-vyah (Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 37% based on 20 votes

Feminine form of FLAVIUS

FRANCIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: FRANT-səs (English)

Rating: 58% based on 19 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman". This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595). In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls.

FREDERICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRED-ə-rik, FRED-rik

Rating: 64% based on 23 votes

English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

FREYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)

Pronounced: FRAY-ah (Norse Mythology), FRAY-ə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 24 votes

From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard. Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FRIEDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: FREE-də

Rating: 31% based on 19 votes

Short form of names containing the element fried, derived from the Germanic element frid meaning "peace".

GABRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Rating: 72% based on 23 votes

From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "strong man of God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, where he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GABRIELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Габриела (Bulgarian)

Pronounced: gahp-RYE-lah (Polish), gah-BRYE-lah (Spanish), gahp-ree-E-lah (German)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 53% based on 21 votes

Feminine form of GABRIEL

GARNET (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GAHR-nət

From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".

GAVRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Hebrew)

Rating: 32% based on 9 votes

Hebrew form of GABRIEL

GILBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: GIL-bərt (English), zheel-BER (French), KHIL-bərt (Dutch), GIL-bert (German)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 50% based on 21 votes

Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.

GINEVRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jee-NEV-rah

Personal note: jih-NEV-ruh

Rating: 62% based on 19 votes

Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".

GODELIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: kho-də-LEE-və

Rating: 26% based on 18 votes

Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA

GODELIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Rating: 24% based on 9 votes

Feminine form of GOTELEIB. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.

GOTTLIEB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: GAWT-leep

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 23% based on 18 votes

German form of GOTELEIB

GREGOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene

Pronounced: GRE-gawr (German)

Rating: 53% based on 12 votes

German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.

GREGORY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GREG-ə-ree

Rating: 65% based on 13 votes

English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It was not used in England, however, until after the Norman conquest. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

GUDRUN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronounced: GOOD-roon (German)

Personal note: GOOD-roon

Rating: 28% based on 9 votes

From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.

GWENDOLEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)

Rating: 62% based on 13 votes

Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and dolen "ring". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

HALLDÓRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Icelandic

Rating: 22% based on 18 votes

Icelandic feminine form of HALDOR

HANNELORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: HAH-ne-lo-rə

Personal note: HAH-ne-lo-rə

Rating: 47% based on 19 votes

Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE

HANNES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish

Pronounced: HAHN-nəs (Dutch), HAH-nes (German)

Rating: 39% based on 18 votes

Short form of JOHANNES

HARRIET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HER-ee-ət, HAR-ee-ət

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'.

HARTWIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: HAHRT-veen (German)

Rating: 25% based on 11 votes

Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".

HEIKO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German, Frisian, Dutch

Pronounced: HIE-ko (German, Dutch)

Rating: 25% based on 18 votes

Low German diminutive of HEINRICH

HENRIETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: hen-ree-ET-ə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 24 votes

English form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

Rating: 80% based on 21 votes

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HILLEVI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Finnish

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Swedish and Finnish form of HEILWIG

HOLLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHL-ee

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 64% based on 21 votes

From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.

IAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: EE-ən (English)

Rating: 67% based on 21 votes

Modern Scottish form of JOHN

IDONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Personal note: ID-uh-nee

Rating: 40% based on 18 votes

Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA

IDRIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 30% based on 17 votes

Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".

ILAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 33% based on 10 votes

Welsh form of HILARIUS

ILDIKÓ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hungarian

Rating: 25% based on 16 votes

Possibly a form of HILDA. This name was borne by the last wife of Attila the Hun.

ILMATAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish Mythology

Rating: 25% based on 8 votes

Derived from Finnish ilma "air". In Finnish mythology Ilmatar was a semi-androgynous goddess of the heavens. She was the mother of Ilmarinen, Väinämöinen and Lemminkäinen.

IMKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: IM-kə

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of IMMA

IMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Low German

Pronounced: I-mah

Rating: 25% based on 17 votes

Low German form of IRMA

IMOGEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: IM-ə-jən

Rating: 54% based on 20 votes

The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

IMRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: EEM-re

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Hungarian form of EMMERICH. This was the name of an 11th-century Hungarian saint, the son of Saint Istvan. He is also known as Emeric.

INDIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 39% based on 18 votes

Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

INDRA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: इन्द्र, इंद्र (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Pronounced: IN-dra

Personal note: IN-dra

Rating: 34% based on 8 votes

Means "possessing drops of rain" from Sanskrit इन्दु (indu) "a drop" and (ra) "possessing". Indra is the name of the ancient Hindu warrior god of the sky and rain. He is the chief god in the Hindu text the Rigveda.

INDRANI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: इन्द्राणी (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Means "queen of INDRA" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess of jealousy and beauty, a wife of Indra.

INDRIÐI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Icelandic

Icelandic form of EINDRIDE

INGA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Russian, Ancient Scandinavian, Ancient Germanic

Other Scripts: Инга (Russian)

Pronounced: ING-ah (Swedish), ING-gah (German), EEN-gah (Russian)

Rating: 34% based on 18 votes

Strictly feminine form of INGE

INGI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Scandinavian

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Old Norse form of INGE

INGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ING-go (German)

Rating: 19% based on 17 votes

German masculine form of INGE

INNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Инна (Russian)

Pronounced: EE-nah

Personal note: EE-nah

Rating: 21% based on 17 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps originally a short form of names ending in ина (ina).

INNES

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 26% based on 17 votes

Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.

ISABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German

Pronounced: ee-sah-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BEL (French), ee-zah-BEL (German)

Rating: 64% based on 21 votes

Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISADORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 61% based on 20 votes

Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISHVI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יִשְׁוִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Rating: 18% based on 5 votes

Means "he resembles me" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Asher in the Old Testament.

ISIDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Исидора (Serbian, Macedonian, Russian), Ισιδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-rah (Spanish), ee-zee-DO-rah (Italian), iz-i-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 57% based on 13 votes

Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.

ISIDORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Georgian, Jewish

Other Scripts: ისიდორე (Georgian)

Pronounced: IZ-i-dawr (English), ee-zee-DOR (French)

Rating: 45% based on 18 votes

From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.

Though it has never been popular in the English-speaking world among Christians, it has historically been a common name for Jews, who have used it as an Americanized form of names such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah.

İSKENDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Turkish

Personal note: Iss-ken-dur

Rating: 38% based on 17 votes

Turkish form of ALEXANDER

ISOTTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ee-ZOT-tah

Personal note: ee-ZOT-tah

Rating: 38% based on 9 votes

Italian form of ISOLDE

ISRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إسراء (Arabic)

Rating: 33% based on 14 votes

Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".

ITHIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אִיתִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Rating: 32% based on 5 votes

Means "God is with me" in Hebrew. This was the name of a minor character in the Old Testament.

IVY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: IE-vee

Rating: 44% based on 18 votes

From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JACENTY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: yah-TSEN-ti

Personal note: yah-TSEN-ti

Rating: 24% based on 18 votes

Polish form of HYACINTHUS. Saint Jacenty was a 13th-century Dominican monk from Krakow who was said to have taken missionary journeys throughout northern Europe and Asia.

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 78% based on 24 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 76% based on 21 votes

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 21 votes

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JASWINDER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Punjabi

Rating: 18% based on 5 votes

Means "Indra of the thunderbolt" from the name of the Hindu god INDRA prefixed with Sanskrit jasu, the name of his thunderbolt.

JENNIFER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEN-i-fər

Rating: 43% based on 20 votes

From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).

JESSAMINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: JES-ə-min

Rating: 50% based on 19 votes

From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.

JOHANNES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman

Pronounced: yo-HAH-nes (German), yo-HAHN-nus (Dutch)

Rating: 54% based on 18 votes

Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). The astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and the composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) are famous bearers of this name.

JOHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN (English)

Rating: 73% based on 20 votes

English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second is the apostle John, who is also traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

JONATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən (English), YO-nah-tahn (German)

Rating: 72% based on 20 votes

From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan) (contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan)) meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul and a friend of David. He was killed in battle with the Philistines. As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote 'Gulliver's Travels' and other works.

JORDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Јордан (Macedonian)

Pronounced: JAWR-dən (English)

Rating: 46% based on 18 votes

From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

Rating: 75% based on 22 votes

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

JUDITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית (Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOO-dith (English), zhoo-DEET (French), YOO-dit (German)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 52% based on 19 votes

From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament, Judith is one of the wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith who kills Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep. As an English name, though there are a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages, it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JULIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Biblical

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lee-ah (German), HOO-lyah (Spanish), YUWL-yah (Polish), YOO:-lee-ah (Ancient Roman)

Rating: 68% based on 22 votes

Feminine form of JULIUS. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Shakespeare used the name in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, German

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YUWL-yahn (Polish), YOO-lee-ahn (German)

Rating: 64% based on 19 votes

From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JUNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOON

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 59% based on 20 votes

From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

JUNIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of JUNIUS. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament (there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman).

KARL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: KAHRL (German, English)

Rating: 44% based on 18 votes

German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.

KENNETH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: KEN-ith (Scottish, English)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 49% based on 17 votes

Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.

KERENSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 43% based on 18 votes

Means "love" in Cornish.

KERTTU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 18% based on 16 votes

Finnish form of GERTRUDE

KESHET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: קֶשֶׁת (Hebrew)

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

Means "rainbow" in Hebrew.

KETEVAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Georgian

Other Scripts: ქეთევან (Georgian)

Rating: 23% based on 4 votes

Georgian form of KATAYUN

KINNERET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: כִּנֶּרֶת (Hebrew)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

From the name of the large lake in northern Israel, usually called the Sea of Galilee in English. Its name is derived from Hebrew כִּנּוֹר (kinnor) meaning "harp" because of its shape.

KRESZENZ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Rating: 18% based on 16 votes

German feminine form of CRESCENTIUS

LAURE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: LOR

Rating: 30% based on 7 votes

French form of LAURA

LAURENCE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ənts

Rating: 51% based on 17 votes

From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

LAURENTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of LAURENTIN

LAWRENCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ənts

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 51% based on 16 votes

Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.

LEANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λεανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: lee-AN-dər (English)

Rating: 49% based on 18 votes

From the Greek Λεανδρος (Leandros) which means "lion of a man" from Greek λεων (leon) "lion" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.

LENORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-NAWR

Rating: 48% based on 18 votes

Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 66% based on 22 votes

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEOCADIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Late Roman

Rating: 29% based on 17 votes

Late Latin name perhaps derived from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white". Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.

LEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LEE-awn (English), LE-awn (German, Polish)

Rating: 54% based on 19 votes

Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.

LEONOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Rating: 52% based on 17 votes

Spanish and Portuguese form of ELEANOR. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married king Alfonso VIII of Castile.

LÉONTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 36% based on 16 votes

French form of LEONTINA

LEOPOLD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish

Pronounced: LE-o-pawlt (German), LAY-o-pawlt (Dutch), LEE-ə-pold (English), le-AW-pawlt (Polish)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 58% based on 17 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).

LILLIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən

Rating: 55% based on 13 votes

Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.

LILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee

Rating: 71% based on 20 votes

From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LINNÉA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: lin-NE-ah

Rating: 54% based on 18 votes

From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LINNET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: li-NET, LIN-ət

Personal note: LIN-ət

Rating: 29% based on 17 votes

Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.

LINO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Galician

Pronounced: LEE-no (Italian, Spanish), LEE-naw (Galician)

Rating: 23% based on 16 votes

Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Galician form of LINUS

LINUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Other Scripts: Λινος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LIE-nəs (English), LEE-nuws (German)

Rating: 43% based on 15 votes

From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times it was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.

LIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Strictly feminine form of LIOR

LIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish Mythology

Pronounced: LEER

Rating: 34% based on 8 votes

Irish cognate of LLYR. Lir was the Irish god of the sea, the father of Manannan mac Lir.

LISELOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish

Pronounced: LEE-ze-law-tə (German)

Rating: 47% based on 18 votes

Contraction of LISA and CHARLOTTE

LOÏC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Breton

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Breton form of LOUIS

LOVISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: loo-VEE-sah

Rating: 36% based on 16 votes

Swedish feminine form of LOUIS

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

Rating: 66% based on 19 votes

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LUDIVINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 20% based on 9 votes

Possibly from a feminine form of LEUTWIN. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the television miniseries 'Les Gens de Mogador'.

MADELIEF

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Derived from Dutch madeliefje meaning "daisy".

MAEVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Pacific/Polynesian, French

Personal note: mah-EH-va / from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 43% based on 16 votes

Means "welcome" in Tahitian.

MAEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: MAYV

Rating: 54% based on 18 votes

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

MAIALEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Basque form of MAGDALENE

MAIRÉAD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 39% based on 15 votes

Irish form of MARGARET

MARCUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: MAR-kuws (Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin), MAHR-kəs (English)

Rating: 49% based on 16 votes

Roman praenomen, or given name, which was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. Famous Roman bearers of this name were Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARIANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: mah-ree-AH-nə (German)

Rating: 53% based on 18 votes

Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.

MARICELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 32% based on 10 votes

Contraction of MARÍA and CELIA

MARIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-REE (French), mah-REE (German)

Rating: 62% based on 20 votes

French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

MARIEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-ee-əl, MAR-ee-əl

Rating: 42% based on 16 votes

Diminutive of MARY influenced by MURIEL. In the case of actress Mariel Hemingway (1961-), the name is from the Cuban town of Mariel.

MARISELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 31% based on 17 votes

Elaborated form of MARISA

MARISOL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 48% based on 16 votes

Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".

MARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical

Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)

Pronounced: MAHRK (English, Russian)

Rating: 48% based on 17 votes

Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second Gospel in the New Testament. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He actually took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARKKU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 19% based on 16 votes

Finnish form of MARK

MARSAILI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Rating: 62% based on 18 votes

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MATHIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: mah-TEE-ahs (German)

Rating: 57% based on 16 votes

Variant of MATTHIAS

MATHILDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-TEELD (French), mah:-TIL-də (Dutch)

Rating: 56% based on 18 votes

Cognate of MATILDA

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English)

Rating: 71% based on 21 votes

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MEHITABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: mi-HIT-ə-bel (English), mee-HIT-ə-bel (English)

Rating: 31% based on 16 votes

Variant of MEHETABEL

MERETE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Rating: 24% based on 5 votes

Danish form of MARGARET

MERIWETHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MER-i-wedh-ər

Rating: 31% based on 16 votes

From a surname meaning "happy weather" in Middle English, originally belonging to a cheery person. A notable bearer of the name was Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), who, with William Clark, explored the west of North America.

MILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz

Rating: 66% based on 20 votes

From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element mil meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Rating: 66% based on 19 votes

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मीरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 50% based on 17 votes

Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Rating: 57% based on 17 votes

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MITRODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Macedonian

Other Scripts: Митродора (Macedonian)

Rating: 22% based on 13 votes

Macedonian form of METRODORA

MOIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Pronounced: MOI-ra

Rating: 45% based on 17 votes

Anglicized form of MÁIRE

MÓR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, Irish

Pronounced: MOR

Rating: 19% based on 16 votes

Means "great" in Gaelic. It is sometimes translated into English as SARAH.

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

Rating: 62% based on 18 votes

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though previously common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NASRIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Iranian

Other Scripts: نسرین (Persian)

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

Means "wild rose" in Persian.

NATALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Georgian, Late Roman

Other Scripts: ნატალია (Georgian)

Pronounced: nah-TAH-lyah (Polish, Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 53% based on 17 votes

Latinate form of NATALIE

NATHANAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נְתַנְאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαναηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: nay-THAN-ee-əl (English), nay-THAN-yəl (English)

Personal note: nuh-THAN-yul / from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 72% based on 18 votes

From the Hebrew name נְתַנְאֵל (Netan'el) meaning "God has given". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle also known as Bartholomew.

NATHANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: nə-THAN-ee-əl (English), nə-THAN-yəl (English)

Personal note: nuh-THAN-yul

Rating: 67% based on 21 votes

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NAVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: נָאוָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 23% based on 16 votes

Means "beautiful" in Hebrew.

NICANOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Νικανωρ (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 28% based on 13 votes

From the Greek name Νικανωρ (Nikanor), which was derived from νικη (nike) "victory". This name was borne by several notable officers from ancient Macedon.

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

Rating: 73% based on 19 votes

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NIKIFOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Polish

Other Scripts: Никифор (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: nee-KEE-fawr (Polish)

Rating: 28% based on 16 votes

Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish form of NIKEPHOROS

NILOFER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Iranian

Other Scripts: نیلوفر (Persian)

Rating: 30% based on 5 votes

Variant transcription of NILOOFAR

NOLWENN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Breton

Rating: 30% based on 5 votes

From the Breton phrase Noyal Gwenn meaning "holy one from Noyal". This was the epithet of a 6th-century saint and martyr from Brittany.

NOOR (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Pakistani, Urdu

Other Scripts: نور (Arabic, Urdu)

Rating: 38% based on 17 votes

Variant transcription of NUR

OLWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.

OONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Finnish

Pronounced: OO-na (Irish)

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Irish variant and Finnish form of ÚNA

ORLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: OR-la

Rating: 47% based on 16 votes

Anglicized form of ÓRFHLAITH

OSCAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: AHS-kər (English)

Rating: 51% based on 19 votes

Possibly means "deer lover", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "lover". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

OSKAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Slovene

Pronounced: AWS-kahr (German, Polish)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 49% based on 18 votes

Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Rating: 71% based on 17 votes

Modern form of OWAIN

PADERAU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 25% based on 15 votes

Means "beads" or "rosary" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

PÁDRAIGÍN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: PAW-dri-geen

Rating: 32% based on 6 votes

Irish form of PATRICIA

PALOMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: pah-LO-mah

Rating: 49% based on 16 votes

Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 63% based on 12 votes

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PEREDUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Personal note: Per-e-dir

Rating: 21% based on 9 votes

Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.

PERONEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Rating: 28% based on 15 votes

Contracted form of PETRONEL

PHILADELPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: fil-ə-DEL-fee-ə

Rating: 33% based on 10 votes

From the name of a city in Asia Minor mentioned in Revelation in the New Testament. The name of the city meant "brotherly love" from Greek φιλεω (phileo) "to love" and αδελφος (adelphos) "brother". It is also the name of a city in the United States.

PHILOMEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: FIL-ə-mel (English)

Personal note: FIL-ə-mel

Rating: 29% based on 16 votes

From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.

PILAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: pee-LAHR

Personal note: pee-LAHR

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.

PRYDERI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology

Rating: 19% based on 9 votes

Means "care" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he is a son of Pwyll and Rhiannon.

RAMONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Romanian, English

Pronounced: rah-MO-nah (Spanish), rə-MON-ə (English)

Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel 'Ramona' (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.

RAVENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 32% based on 16 votes

Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.

RÉMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ray-MEE

Rating: 53% based on 16 votes

French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.

RENATA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman

Pronounced: re-NAH-tah (Italian, Spanish, German, Polish)

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

Feminine form of RENATUS

RITVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 20% based on 15 votes

Means "birch branch" in Finnish.

RIVKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: רִיבְקָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 40% based on 15 votes

Hebrew form of REBECCA

ROBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish

Pronounced: RAH-bin (English)

Rating: 46% based on 16 votes

Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.

ROLAND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Polish

Pronounced: RO-lənd (English), ro-LAWN (French), RAW-lahnt (Polish)

Rating: 49% based on 15 votes

Means "famous land" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and land. Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.

ROSEMARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree

Rating: 67% based on 20 votes

Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

ROSWITHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Rating: 17% based on 15 votes

Means "famous strength" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinþ "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems.

ROWAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: RO-ən (English)

Rating: 62% based on 17 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendent of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

RUBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO-bee

Rating: 53% based on 17 votes

Simply means "ruby" from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

RUPERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German, Dutch, English, Polish

Pronounced: RUY-pərt (Dutch), ROO-pərt (English), RUW-pert (Polish)

Rating: 55% based on 17 votes

Low German form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.

RUSUDAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Georgian

Other Scripts: რუსუდან (Georgian)

Possibly derived from Persian روز (ruz) meaning "day". This name was borne by a 13th-century ruling queen of Georgia.

RUTH (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)

Rating: 56% based on 18 votes

From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament, a Moabite woman who was the ancestor of King David. As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 45% based on 18 votes

Swedish short form of SUSANNA. It can also be derived from Swedish sann meaning "true".

SANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, Danish

Pronounced: SAHN-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 33% based on 16 votes

Dutch and Danish short form of SUSANNA

SARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew), سارة (Arabic)

Pronounced: SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), ZAH-rah (German)

Rating: 73% based on 19 votes

Means "lady" or "princess" in Hebrew. This is the name of the wife of Abraham in the Old Testament. She became the mother of Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it (see Genesis 17:15). In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SAVERIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 23% based on 16 votes

Italian feminine form of XAVIER

SCHOLASTICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Rating: 28% based on 18 votes

From a Late Latin name which was derived from scholasticus meaning "rhetorician, orator". This was the name of a 6th-century saint, the sister of Saint Benedict.

SEDNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Mythology

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.

SELMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: SEL-mə (English), ZEL-mah (German)

Rating: 43% based on 17 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.

SELWYN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SEL-win

Rating: 31% based on 15 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".

SÉRAPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: say-ra-FEEN

Rating: 55% based on 17 votes

French form of SERAPHINA

SEVDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Means "love" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

SÉVÉRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 43% based on 15 votes

French feminine form of SEVERINUS

SIBYLLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek

Other Scripts: Σιβυλλα (Greek)

Pronounced: zi-BUY-lah (German)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 33% based on 16 votes

Greek and Latinate form of SIBYL

SIDONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Rating: 33% based on 16 votes

Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This name was in use in the Middle Ages, when it became associated with the word sindon (of Greek origin) meaning "linen", a reference to the Shroud of Turin.

SIGALIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: סִיגָלִית (Hebrew)

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Means "violet flower" in Hebrew.

SIGRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".

SIGRÚN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.

SILVESTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Slovene, Slovak, Late Roman

Pronounced: sil-VES-tər (English)

Rating: 39% based on 18 votes

From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.

SILVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: SEEL-vyah (Italian), SEEL-byah (Spanish)

Rating: 34% based on 17 votes

Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

Rating: 53% based on 17 votes

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SINDRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic

Rating: 27% based on 16 votes

Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.

SINI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 30% based on 6 votes

Means "blue" in Finnish. More specifically, sini is a poetic term for the colour blue.

SINIKKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 35% based on 6 votes

Elaborated form of SINI

SIOFRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: SHI-frə

Rating: 28% based on 5 votes

Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.

SOHVI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 26% based on 5 votes

Finnish form of SOPHIA

SOLOMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish

Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən (English)

Rating: 46% based on 17 votes

From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David, renowned for his wisdom. Supposedly, he wrote the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon in the Old Testament. This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish.

SOPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), so-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-ah (German)

Rating: 69% based on 20 votes

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which was the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

SOPHRONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature, Late Greek

Other Scripts: Σωφρονια (Ancient Greek)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 39% based on 17 votes

Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olinde.

SOTIRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Σωτηρια (Greek)

Rating: 26% based on 16 votes

Feminine form of SOTIRIS

STEPHEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STEF-ən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 16 votes

From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament, and he is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (10th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-) and the American author Stephen King (1947-).

SUNNIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian

Rating: 32% based on 17 votes

Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.

SURINDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Punjabi

Rating: 18% based on 6 votes

Punjabi form of SURENDRA

SUSAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SOO-zən

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 49% based on 17 votes

English variant of SUSANNA. This has been most common spelling since the 18th century. A notable bearer was the American feminist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906).

SUSANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Сусанна (Russian), שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew), Сѹсанна (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: soo-ZAHN-nah (Italian), soo-ZAN-ə (English)

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 59% based on 16 votes

From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministered to Christ.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

SUSANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Rating: 64% based on 17 votes

Form of SUSANNA found in some versions of the Old Testament.

SUSANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: zoo-ZAH-nə (German)

Rating: 42% based on 10 votes

German and Scandinavian form of SUSANNA

SVENJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: SVEN-yah

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

German feminine form of SVEN. Alternatively, it may be a Low German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element svan meaning "swan".

SYLVANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: sil-VAN-ə (English)

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Variant of SILVANA

TAAVETTI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 19% based on 13 votes

Finnish form of DAVID

TEGWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

Derived from the Welsh elements teg "fair" and gwen "blessed".

TEMITOPE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Western African, Yoruba

Rating: 18% based on 6 votes

Means "enough to give thanks" in Yoruba.

TERPSICHORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Τερψιχορη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 28% based on 9 votes

Means "enjoying the dance" from Greek τερψις (terpsis) "delight" and χορος (choros) "dance". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and dramatic chorus, one of the nine Muses.

TESNI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.

THEODOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian

Rating: 49% based on 11 votes

German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.

THEODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα (Greek)

Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 70% based on 12 votes

Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

Rating: 65% based on 20 votes

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

TIMOTHEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek

Other Scripts: Τιμοθεα (Greek)

Rating: 48% based on 17 votes

Feminine form of TIMOTHY

TIMOTHY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: TIM-ə-thee (English)

Rating: 54% based on 16 votes

From the Greek name Τιμοθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμαω (timao) "to honour" and θεος (theos) "god". Saint Timothy was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys and was the recipient of two of Paul's epistles that appear in the New Testament. According to tradition, he was martyred at Ephesus after protesting the worship of Artemis. As an English name, Timothy was not used until after the Protestant Reformation.

TOVA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 47% based on 17 votes

Swedish variant of TOVE

TRISTAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, French, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), trees-TAWN (French)

Rating: 71% based on 17 votes

Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". In Celtic legend Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. Instead, Tristan and Isolde end up falling in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

TZIPORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 29% based on 16 votes

Hebrew form of ZIPPORAH

VASILIKI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Βασιλικη (Greek)

Rating: 24% based on 18 votes

Modern Greek feminine form of BASIL (1)

VERA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: VYE-rah (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 18 votes

Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: VER-i-tee

Personal note: from Baby Name Expert

Rating: 38% based on 18 votes

From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Rating: 69% based on 12 votes

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

WENDELIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: VEN-de-leen (German)

Rating: 35% based on 6 votes

Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wandal (see WENDEL). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.

WILHELMINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Polish, English

Pronounced: vil-hel-MEE-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 62% based on 20 votes

Dutch, German and Polish feminine form of WILHELM

WILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ə

Rating: 46% based on 18 votes

Feminine form of WILLIAM

WINIFRED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: WIN-i-frid

Rating: 51% based on 17 votes

Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.

ZEBEDEE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: Ζεβεδαιος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ZEB-i-dee (English)

Rating: 23% based on 18 votes

From Ζεβεδαιος (Zebedaios), the Greek form of ZEBADIAH used in the New Testament, where it refers to the father of the apostles James and John.

ZENOVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Greek)

Rating: 23% based on 16 votes

Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA

ZEV

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: זְאֵב (Hebrew)

Rating: 29% based on 15 votes

Variant transcription of ZEEV

ZEYNEP

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 23% based on 6 votes

Turkish form of ZAYNAB

ZIMRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: זִמְרִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ZIM-rie (English)

Personal note: ZIM-rie

Rating: 30% based on 8 votes

Means either "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament who rules for only seven days.

ZIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: זִיוָה (Hebrew)

Personal note: ZEE-vah

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of ZIV

ZVI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: צְבִי (Hebrew)

Personal note: tsvee

Rating: 21% based on 17 votes

Variant transcription of TZVI
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.