Diest's Personal Name List

AILÍS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: AY-leesh

Rating: 10% based on 2 votes

Irish form of ALICE

AINSLEY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: AYNZ-lee

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves mean either "Anne's field" or "hermitage field" from Old English ansetl "hermitage" and leah "field".

ALESSIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

Italian form of ALEXIS

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Rating: 68% based on 4 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALISTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of ALASDAIR

ALTAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.

AMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Western African, Igbo

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "grace" in Igbo.

AMARANTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

French form of AMARANTHA

ANDERS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Scandinavian form of Andreas (see ANDREW). A famous bearer was the Swedish physicist Anders Angstrom.

ANNELIESE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: ah-ne-LEE-zə (German), ahn-nə-LEE-sə (Dutch)

Rating: 88% based on 4 votes

Combination of ANNA and LIESE

ANSELM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: AHN-zelm (German), AN-selm (English)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.

ARIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

AVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: av-ə-LEEN

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.

AYŞE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Turkish form of AISHA

AYSEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "moon stream" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

AZAR

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Persian

Other Scripts: آذر (Persian)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "fire" in Persian.

CECILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SES-i-lee

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.

CIARÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CORBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-bin

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

ELIŠKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Czech and Slovak diminutive of ELIZABETH

ELLIOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.

ELYSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".

ELŻBIETA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: elzh-BYE-tah

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Polish form of ELIZABETH

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

FRIEDERIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: free-du-REE-kə

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

German feminine form of FREDERICK

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GILBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: GIL-bərt (English), zheel-BER (French), KHIL-bərt (Dutch), GIL-bert (German)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.

GODELIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: kho-də-LEE-və

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISEULT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: i-SOOLT (English), i-ZOOLT (English), EE-səlt (English)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Medieval variant of ISOLDE

ISIDOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Russian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Исидор (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: EE-see-dawr (German)

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE

ISOBEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Scottish form of ISABEL

ISRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إسراء (Arabic)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".

IZAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means "star" in Basque.

JAMIE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: JAY-mee

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.

KATJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene

Pronounced: KAHT-yah (German, Dutch)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

German, Scandinavian, Dutch and Slovene form of KATYA

KIRA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KEE-rə

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Variant of CIARA (1)

KYRILU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Medieval Slavic

Other Scripts: Кѷрилъ (Church Slavic)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Medieval Slavic form of CYRIL

LÆRKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means "lark" in Danish.

LILEAS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of LILLIAN

LINNET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: li-NET, LIN-ət

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.

LUCIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian, English

Pronounced: LOO-shən (English)

Rating: 73% based on 3 votes

Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUKA

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Лука (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian), ლუკა (Georgian), Лѹка (Church Slavic)

Rating: 77% based on 3 votes

Form of LUKE

LUMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Pronounced: LOO-mee

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Means "snow" in Finnish.

MAËLYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MALLORY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MAL-ə-ree

From an English surname which meant "unfortunate" in Norman French. It first became common in the 1980s due to the television comedy 'Family Ties', which featured a character by this name.

MARIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MER-is, MAR-is

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".

MARIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET

MATTHIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ματθιας (Greek)

Pronounced: mah-TEE-ahs (German), mə-THIE-əs (English)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.

MELUSINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Mythology

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.

MIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मीरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.

NIMUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Modern form of OWAIN

QUENTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: kawn-TEN (French), KWEN-tin (English)

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.

QUINCY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KWINT-see

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the given name QUINTUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.

RÉMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: re-MEE

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.

RENATE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Norwegian

Pronounced: re-NAH-tə (German), rə-NAH-tə (Dutch)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

German, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of RENATUS

RUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of RUNE

SASKIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German

Pronounced: SAHS-kee-ah: (Dutch), ZAHS-kee-ah (German)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

From the Germanic element Sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Dutch

Pronounced: SEM (Dutch)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Form of SHEM used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.

SETH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SETH (English)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SIOFRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: SHEEF-rə

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.

TAMSIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: TAM-sin

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.

ULRIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: uwl-REE-kə

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

German feminine form of ULRICH

VALENCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: bah-LEN-thyah (Spanish), bah-LEN-syah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

From a Late Latin name which was derived from valentia "power". Cities in Spain and Venezuela bear this name.

VALERIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vah-LE-ryah (Italian), bah-LE-ryah (Spanish)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.

VASILISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Василиса (Russian)

Pronounced: vah-see-LEE-sah

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Russian feminine form of BASIL (1)

VICTORIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English), vik-TO-ree-ah (German)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), ven-SAWN (French)

Rating: 83% based on 4 votes

From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIVIEN (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Used by Alfred Lord Tennyson as the name of the Lady of the Lake in his Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859). Tennyson may have based it on VIVIENNE, but it possibly arose as a misreading of NINIAN. A famous bearer was British actress Vivien Leigh (1913-1967), who played Scarlett O'Hara in 'Gone with the Wind'.

WILLEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: VIL-ləm, WIL-ləm

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 88% based on 4 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

YLVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".

YVETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ee-VET (French), i-VET (English)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

French feminine form of YVES
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.