Diest's Personal Name List

ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), a-DAWN (French), AH-dahm (German, Polish), AH:-dahm (Dutch), ah-DAHM (Russian, Ukrainian)

Rating: 73% based on 3 votes

This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

AILILL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: AL-yil

Means "elf" in Irish Gaelic. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of queen Medb.

AILÍS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: AY-leesh

Rating: 10% based on 2 votes

Irish form of ALICE

AILSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 10% based on 2 votes

From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.

AINSLEY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: AYNZ-lee

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves mean either "Anne's field" or "hermitage field" from Old English ansetl "hermitage" and leah "field".

ALESSIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

Italian form of ALEXIS

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 80% based on 3 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALISTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of ALASDAIR

ALTAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.

AMABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS

AMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Western African, Igbo

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "grace" in Igbo.

AMARANTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

French form of AMARANTHA

ANDERS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Scandinavian form of Andreas (see ANDREW). A famous bearer was the Swedish physicist Anders Angstrom.

ANDREA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Андреа (Serbian)

Pronounced: AN-dree-ə (English), an-DRAY-ə (English), ahn-DRE-ah (German)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.

ANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: AN-a (English), AHN-nah (Italian, Dutch, Polish), AH-nah (German, Russian)

Rating: 90% based on 3 votes

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

ANNELIESE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: ah-ne-LEE-zə (German), ahn-nə-LEE-sə (Dutch)

Rating: 83% based on 3 votes

Combination of ANNA and LIESE

ANNORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Medieval English variant of HONORA

ANSELM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: AHN-zelm (German), AN-selm (English)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.

ARACELY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Variant of ARACELI

ARIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASPEN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: AS-pən

Rating: 3% based on 3 votes

From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: av-ə-LEEN

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.

AYŞE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Turkish form of AISHA

AYSEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "moon stream" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

AZAR

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Iranian

Other Scripts: آذر (Persian)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Means "fire" in Persian.

AZURE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: A-zhər

Rating: 3% based on 3 votes

From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".

CARL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: KAHRL (German, English)

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss, who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung, who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.

CECILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SES-i-lee

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.

CORBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-bin

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CRISPIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KRIS-pin

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

DUNCAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: DUN-kən (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh meaning "brown warrior", derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "warrior". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).

ELISAVETA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Елисавета (Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Bulgarian and Macedonian form of ELIZABETH

ELIŠKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Czech and Slovak diminutive of ELIZABETH

ELLIOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.

ELSPETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: EL-speth

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of ELIZABETH

ELYSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".

ELŻBIETA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: elzh-BYE-tah

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Polish form of ELIZABETH

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

EVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Dutch

Pronounced: EV-ə-leen (English), EV-ə-lien (English), ay-və-LEE-nə (Dutch), ay-və-LEEN (Dutch)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Variant of EVELINA

FARON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

From a French surname which was derived from the Germanic given name Faro.

FRIEDERIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: free-du-REE-kə

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

German feminine form of FREDERICK

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GILBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: GIL-bərt (English), zheel-BER (French), KHIL-bərt (Dutch), GIL-bert (German)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.

GODELIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: kho-də-LEE-və

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA

GREER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: GREER

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.

GREY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: GRAY

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Variant of GRAY

INGRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronounced: ING-rid (Swedish), ING-ree (Norwegian), ING-grit (German)

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).

IRENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch, Lithuanian

Other Scripts: Ирена (Serbian)

Pronounced: ee-RE-nah (Polish), ee-RAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Latinate form of IRENE

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISEULT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: i-SOOLT (English), i-ZOOLT (English), EE-səlt (English)

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Medieval variant of ISOLDE

ISIDOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Russian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Исидор (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: EE-see-dawr (German)

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE

ISOBEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of ISABEL

ISRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إسراء (Arabic)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".

IZAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means "star" in Basque.

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 80% based on 3 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JAMIE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: JAY-mee

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.

JOHANNES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman

Pronounced: yo-HAH-nes (German), yo-HAHN-nus (Dutch)

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). The astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and the composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) are famous bearers of this name.

KAI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch

Pronounced: KIE (German)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.

KATJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene

Pronounced: KAHT-yah (German, Dutch)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

German, Scandinavian, Dutch and Slovene form of KATYA

KILLIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Anglicized variant of CILLIAN

KYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KIE-rə, KEE-rə

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.

KYRILU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Medieval Slavic

Other Scripts: Кѷрилъ (Church Slavic)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Medieval Slavic form of CYRIL

LÆRKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means "lark" in Danish.

LILEAS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of LILLIAN

LINDEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIN-dən

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

From a German surname which was derived from linde meaning "lime tree".

LINNET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: li-NET, LIN-ət

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.

LUCIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian, English

Pronounced: LOO-shən (English)

Rating: 73% based on 3 votes

Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUKA

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Лука (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian), ლუკა (Georgian), Лѹка (Church Slavic)

Rating: 77% based on 3 votes

Form of LUKE

LUMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Means "snow" in Finnish.

LYRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: LIR-ik

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MAËLYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MARIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MER-is, MAR-is

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".

MARIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET

MATTEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: maht-TE-o

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Italian form of MATTHEW

MATTHIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ματθιας (Greek)

Pronounced: mah-TEE-ahs (German), mə-THIE-əs (English)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.

MATTIA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: maht-TEE-ah

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Italian form of MATTHIAS

MELUSINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Mythology

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.

MERIWETHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MER-i-wedh-ər

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

From a surname meaning "happy weather" in Middle English, originally belonging to a cheery person. A notable bearer of the name was Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), who, with William Clark, explored the west of North America.

MIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मीरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though previously common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NATHÁLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Portuguese form of NATALIE

NIMUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

NYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), Spanish, Literature

Pronounced: NID-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel 'The Last Days of Pompeii' (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".

QUENTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: kawn-TEN (French), KWEN-tin (English)

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.

QUINCY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KWINT-see

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the given name QUINTUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.

RÉMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ray-MEE

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.

RENATE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Norwegian

Pronounced: re-NAH-tə (German), rə-NAH-tə (Dutch)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

German, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of RENATUS

ROWAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: RO-ən (English)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendent of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

RUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of RUNE

RŮŽENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".

SAFFRON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SAF-rən

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is ultimately derived from Arabic زعفران (za'faran).

SASKIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German

Pronounced: SAHS-kee-ah: (Dutch), ZAHS-kee-ah (German)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

From the Germanic element sachs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Dutch

Pronounced: SEM (Dutch)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Form of SHEM used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.

SETH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SETH (English)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SINCLAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: sin-KLER

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

From a surname which was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).

SIOFRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: SHI-frə

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.

SORREL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SAWR-əl

Rating: 3% based on 3 votes

From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".

SPARROW

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SPAR-o

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.

STERRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: STER-rə

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Derived from Dutch ster meaning "star".

SYLVIANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Variant of SYLVAINE

TAMSIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: TAM-sin

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.

THORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Modern form of ÞÓRA

THORSTEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Danish, German

Pronounced: TAWR-sten (German)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

Variant of TORSTEN

ULRIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish

Pronounced: uwl-REE-kə (German)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

German and Danish feminine form of ULRICH

VALENCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: bah-LEN-thyah (Spanish), bah-LEN-syah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

From a Late Latin name which was derived from valentia "power". Cities in Spain and Venezuela bear this name.

VALENTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VAL-ən-tien

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.

VALERIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vah-LE-ryah (Italian), bah-LE-ryah (Spanish)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.

VASILISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Василиса (Russian)

Pronounced: vah-see-LEE-sah

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Russian feminine form of BASIL (1)

VAUGHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: VAWN

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

From a Welsh surname which was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".

VERITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: VER-i-tee

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VESNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Весна (Serbian, Macedonian)

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Means "messenger" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic spirit associated with the springtime. In many Slavic languages this is now the poetic word for "spring". It has been used as a given name only since the 20th century.

VICTORIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of VICTORIUS, though later it was regarded as coming directly from Latin victoria meaning "victory". It was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa. Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), ven-SAWN (French)

Rating: 83% based on 3 votes

From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VITALIY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Виталий (Russian)

Pronounced: vee-TAH-lee

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Russian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).

VITTORIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Italian form of VICTORIA (1)

VIVEKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Swedish form of WIEBKE

VIVIEN (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Used by Alfred Lord Tennyson as the name of the Lady of the Lake in his Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859). Tennyson may have based it on VIVIENNE, but it possibly arose as a misreading of NINIAN. A famous bearer was British actress Vivien Leigh (1913-1967), who played Scarlett O'Hara in 'Gone with the Wind'.

WILLEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: VIL-ləm, WIL-ləm

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 83% based on 3 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

YEKATERINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Екатерина (Russian)

Pronounced: ye-kah-tye-REE-nah, ee-kah-tee-REE-nah

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

Russian form of KATHERINE

YLVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".

YVETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ee-VET (French), i-VET (English)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

French feminine form of YVES

YVONNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ee-VON (French), i-VAWN (English), ee-VAWN (German)

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

French feminine form of YVON. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

ZULEIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: zoo-LAY-kə (English)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Possibly means "brilliant beauty" in Persian. According to medieval legends this was the name of Potiphar's wife in the Bible. She has been the subject of many poems and tales.

ZURI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Means "beautiful" in Swahili.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.