titans1011's Personal Name List

ABE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish

Pronounced: AYB (English)

Short form of ABRAHAM

ALEC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-ək

Short form of ALEXANDER

AMETHYST

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AM-ə-thist

From the name of the precious stone, which is Greek in origin and means "not drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.

ANDREW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: AN-droo (English)

From the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος (andros) "of a man"). In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

AVALON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AV-ə-lahn

From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit which was often linked with paradise.

ELLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə

Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element ali meaning "other". It was introduced to England by the Normans and used until the 14th century, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the American singer Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996).

GAGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: GAYJ

From an English surname meaning "measure" in Middle English, originally denoting one who was an assayer. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).

MADISON

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAD-i-sən

From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president.

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

RILEY

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RIE-lee

From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

RYAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: RIE-ən

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendent of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.