910's Personal Name List

ADERYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Personal note: (Rinn)

Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

AENOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name of unknown meaning. This was the name of the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine.

ANGHARAD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology

Personal note: (Angie)

Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.

ANNUSHKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Аннушка (Russian)

Russian diminutive of ANNA

ARIANRHOD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology

Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

BRIDGET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: BRIJ-ət (English)

Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.

CONN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.

CONNOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)

Variant of CONOR

CONOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.

CORALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

EIFION

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: AYV-yon, IEV-yon

Personal note: AYV yon

Meaning unknown. This was an old Welsh name that was revived in the 19th century.

ERIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: ER-in

Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

FINN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish

Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.

MEGAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: MEG-ən (English)

Personal note: (Meg)

Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.

NORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian

Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-rah (German)

Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

RHODRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Derived from the Welsh elements rhod "wheel" and rhi "king". This name was borne by a 9th-century Welsh king.

SERAPHINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman

Personal note: (Finn?)

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

TANITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology

Personal note: (Tansy?)

Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.

THOMAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)

Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MAH (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of the apostle who initially doubts the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.