New World Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the various indigenous peoples who inhabited North and South America.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
A'AKULUUJJUSI f Inuit Mythology
A'akuluujjusi is the great creator mother among the Inuit people.
ACAN m Mayan Mythology
Means "groan". This is the name of the Mayan God of wine and celebration.
ACUECUCYOTICIHUATI f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
The Aztec goddess of the ocean, running water, and rivers, closely associated with Chalchiuhtlicue of whom she is another appearance. She is invoked by Aztec women in labor.
AGLOOLIK m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Agloolik is a spirit that lives underneath the ice and gives aid to fishermen and hunters.
AH-CILIZ m Mayan Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the Mayan god of eclipses.
AHKIYYINI m Inuit Mythology
In Eskimo folklore there is a skeleton-ghost named Ahkiyyini. He was always dancing when he was alive, and his skeleton comes back every so often to do a jig that shakes the ground and turns boats over in the river... [more]
AHTUNOWHIHO m New World Mythology, Cheyenne
Derived from Cheyenne ȧhtóno'e "under, below" and vé'ho'e "trickster, spider, white man". This is the name of a Cheyenne god who lives under the ground.
AIPALOOVIK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Aipaloovik is an evil sea god associated with death and destruction.
AJBIT m Mayan Mythology
One of the thirteen Mayan gods who created human beings. Ajbit assisted in the actual construction work.
AJTZAK m Mayan Mythology
One of the thirteen Mayan gods who created human beings. He did mainly the same work as Ajbit did.
AJUT f Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Derived from Canadian Arctic ajujuq meaning "runs away". In Greenland mythology Ajut is the name of the woman who flees from her pursuer and becomes the sun.
AKBUL m New World Mythology
Is a Mayan mythology name, which means, 'of the night.'
AKHLUT m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Akhlut is a spirit that takes the form of both a wolf and an orca. It is a vicious, dangerous beast. Its tracks can be recognized because they are wolf tracks that lead to and from the ocean.
AĸIGSSIAĸ f Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "Ptarmigan chick" in Greenlandic.
AKNA f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Akna ("mother") is a goddess of fertility and childbirth. ... [more]
AKYCHA m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Akycha is a solar deity worshipped in Alaska.
ALAHTIN f New World Mythology
The name of the Chumash goddess of the moon who also governs over purification, health and menstruation.
ALIGNAK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Alignak is a lunar deity and god of weather, water, tides, eclipses and earthquakes.
ALOM m Mayan Mythology
A Mayan god of the sky, and one of the seven gods who created the world and the humans.
ALUBERI m New World Mythology
The great spirit of the Arawak of Guyana.
AMAGUQ m Inuit Mythology
According to Inuit mythology Amaguq is a trickster and wolf god.
AMAROK m Inuit Mythology
Amarok is the name of a giant wolf in Inuit mythology. It will hunt down and devour anyone foolish enough to hunt alone at night. It is sometimes considered equivalent to the waheela of cryptozoology.
AMOTKEN m New World Mythology
The creator deity of the Salish, North American Indians, he dwells in heaven, solitary and alone.
ANCERIKA m New World Mythology
The sun god of the Tapirape, Brazil.
ANDICIOPEC m New World Mythology
In Crow mythology, this is a legendary warrior-hero invincible to bullets.
ANGUTA m Inuit Mythology
Allegedly means "man with something to cut" (compare Inuktitut ᐊᖑᑦ (angut) meaning "man"). In Inuit mythology this is the name of a god, sometimes considered a psychopomp responsible for conveying the souls of the dead to the underworld, Adlivun, where they must sleep for a year... [more]
ANIMIKII m Ojibwe, New World Mythology
Means "thunder", from the Ojibwe animikiikaa "there is thunder". ... [more]
ANINGÂĸ m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "big brother of a girl" in Greenlandic. Aningâĸ is the name of the moon in Greenlandic mythology.
ANINGAN m Inuit Mythology, Greenlandic
The god of the moon among the Inuit of Greenland. He is called Igaluk by the Inuit of Canada and Alaska.
ANNINGAN m Inuit Mythology
Variant of Aningan. In Greenlandic mythology Anningan is the god of the moon and the brother of Malîna, the sun goddess. He chases his sister across the sky. The Greenlandic people explained the phases of the moon by saying Anningan forgets to eat while chasing her and becomes thinner and thinner, then leaves for three days to find food before returning to chase his sister again.
APANUUGAK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Apanuugak is a culture hero who was sometimes depicted as an error-prone warrior who lives to old age and sometimes as a dastardly villain.
ARNAALUK f Inuit Mythology
The spirit name of a group of Inuit from a particular region, meaning "a big woman", a spirit of the woman under the sea. Prominent in Inuit mythology.
ARNAKUAGSAK f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Arnakuagsak, meaning "old woman from the sea," was an Inuit goddess, one of the primary deities of the religion, who was responsible for ensuring the hunters were able to catch enough food and that the people remained healthy and strong.
ARNAPKAPFAALUK f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
Means "big bad woman". Arnapkapfaaluk was the sea goddess of the Inuit people living in Canada's Coronation Gulf area. Although occupying the equivalent position to Sedna within Inuit mythology, in that she had control of the animals of the seas, she was noticeably different as can be seen by the English translation of her name.
ARNARQUAGSSAQ f Inuit Mythology
The Inuit goddess of the sea. According to most versions of the legend Arnarquagssaq, commonly known as Sedna, was once a beautiful mortal woman who became the ruler of Adlivun (the Inuit underworld at the bottom of the sea) after her father threw her out of his kayak into the ocean... [more]
ARNATUK f Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
The name is from the mythological concept of soul or name wandering: arnattartoq: arnattoq/arnappoq meaning "seeks a mother".
ASDZĄ́Ą́ NÁDLEEHÉ f New World Mythology
The name of a Navajo creation goddess whose name means "changing woman" or "woman who changes".
ASIAQ f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Asiaq is a weather goddess (or, more rarely a god) and was quite frequently invoked by the angakoq for good weather.
ASINTMAH f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of Athabaskan earth and nature goddess and the first woman.
ATABEY f New World Mythology
Supreme goddess of the Taínos worshipped as a goddess of fresh water and fertility.
ATIRA f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of the Pawnee earth goddess.
ATLAHUA m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
The name of an Aztec god, allegedly a water god, fisherman and archer. There were said to be at least four temples dedicated to him, and supposedly the Aztecs prayed to him when there were deaths in water, such as during Hernán Cortés's conquest of Tenochtitlan (the Ancient Aztec capital on a lake, now Mexico City).
ATSHEN m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Atshen is a cannibalistic spirit.
AULANERK f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Aulanerk is a friendly sea goddess who rules over the tides, waves and joy.
AUMANIL m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Aumanil is a kind and beneficent spirit. Also, it is said that this god lived on land and controlled the movement of the whales.
AWILIX f New World Mythology, Mayan Mythology
The name of the Mayan goddess of the moon, night, underworld, sickness and death. Her name may be derived from the Q'eqchi' Maya word kwilix/wilix meaning "swallow (bird)".
AZTLAN m & f Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Nahuatl (?), American (Hispanic, Rare), Mexican (Rare)
Aztlan is the mythical homeland of the Aztec peoples. In their language (Nahuatl), the roots of Aztlan are the two words: aztatl tlan(tli) meaning "heron" and "place of". The homeland was said to have many heron birds and may have been translated to 'place of white-ness' or even 'brightness' (as used by some Chicanos) because of the large population of the white feathered birds living there... [more]
CABRAKAN m Mayan Mythology
Means "earthquake" in Mayan. Cabrakan was the god of mountains and earthquakes.
CAKULHA m New World Mythology
One of the Mayan gods of lightning.
CAMAZOTZ m Mayan Mythology
Camazotz represented bats in Mayan mythology. Bats were considered symbols of rebirth and the underworld.
CANEQUE f & m New World Mythology
A Mayan name meaning roughly, 'mischievous forest spirit.' Appears in local mythology.
CAUAC m New World Mythology
A name found in Mayan mythology and representing the South.
CHAC m New World Mythology
The Mayan god of Agriculture, Fertility, and Rain. He is also associated with east and the colour yellow.
CH'ASKA f Incan Mythology, Quechua
In Incan mythology, Ch'aska ("Venus") or Ch'aska Quyllur ("Venus star") was the goddess of dawn and twilight, the planet Venus, flowers, maidens, and sex. She protected virgin girls. This name is of a separate etmology, with the Quechua ch'aska referring to what they thought was the brightest star but was the planet Venus... [more]
CHEPI f & m Algonquin, New World Mythology
Many baby name sites and books list this name as meaning "fairy" in Algonquin but that is incorrect. It more accurately means "ghost", and it was another name for Hobomock, the manito ('spirit') of death-- a destructive, often evil being... [more]
CHÍA f New World Mythology
Pre-Columbian goddess of the moon.... [more]
CHICOMECŌĀTL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl chicome meaning "seven" and coatl "snake". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of food, drink, harvest, maize and famine.
CHICŌMEXŌCHITL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl chicome meaning "seven" and xochitl "flower". This was an epithet of the Aztec mother goddess Tonantzin.
CHĪMALMĀ f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "shield hand" in Nahuatl, derived in part from chīmalli "shield". In Aztec legend this was the name of the mother of the Toltec god Quetzalcoatl.
CIHUACŌĀTL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl cihuātl meaning "woman, lady" and coatl "snake". This was the name of an Aztec fertility goddess.
COATLICUE f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "skirt of snakes" in Nahuatl. She is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. The goddesses Tocih “our grandmother”, and Cihuacoatl “snake woman”, the patron of women who die in childbirth, were also seen as aspects of Coatlicue.
COYOLXĀUHQUI f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "painted with bells" in Nahuatl. This was the name of an Aztec goddess, the daughter of Cōātlīcue.
EEYEEKALDUK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Eeyeekalduk was the god of medicine and good health.
EKKEKO m Incan Mythology
A Bolivian god of plenty and wealth. According to an ancient legend, when you place a miniature object on a doll representing the god, you will receive what you wish for the following year. It is considered bad luck to remove those objects from the doll.
ERZULIE f Afro-American Mythology, New World Mythology
This is the Haitian Voodoo love goddess and goddess of elemental forces. She is personified as a water snake. She is also called Ezili.
GUABANCEX f New World Mythology
Possibly means "rider of the hurricane" in Taíno. This was the name of a Taíno wind and water goddess who personified the hurricane. She was the strongest deity in the Taíno pantheon and the only female zemí.
GYHLDEPTIS f New World Mythology
She is a kindly forest goddess in Haida mythology whose name translates to "Lady Hanging Hair."
HASTSÉOLTOI f New World Mythology, Navajo
The name of the goddess of the chase or hunt in Navajo mythology.
HINON m New World Mythology
Means "thunder" in Iroquois. He was is the god of thunder in Iroquois and Wyandot mythology, where he is depicted as a thunderbird (the thunderbird is a symbol common to many Native American tribes, Hinon is only represented by the symbol by these specific peoples, not all).
HUEHUETEOTL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Aztec god that recieved particularly brutal human sacrifices.
HUITACA f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of the Muisca goddess of arts, dance and music, witchcraft, sexual liberation and the Moon who was turned into a white owl.
HUNAHPU m Mayan Mythology, New World Mythology
From Popul Vu, the Mayan holy book. Hunahpu was one of the hero twins from Mayan mythology, and with his brother Xbalanque defeated the underworld gods.
IDLIRAGIJENGET f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Idliragijenget is the god of the ocean.
IEMANJÁ f Afro-American Mythology, New World Mythology
Portuguese Brazilian variant of Yemaja, also used in Uruguay. In many Afro-American religions she is the Goddess of the Ocean, also the Mother Goddess and patron of women.
IGALUK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Igaluk is a lunar god. He lusted after his sister, the solar goddess Malina, but she rejected his advances and fled from him. Their eternal chase explains the movement of the sun and the moon through the sky.... [more]
IGNIRTOQ m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Ignirtoq is a god of light and truth.
IJAAKAAQ m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Greenlandic name meaning "moon".... [more]
ILASIAQ m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "a companion acquired (through magic)" in Greenlandic. This occurs in a legend from the Upernavik region of northern Greenland.
IRERI f Native American, Tarascan, Spanish, New World Mythology
Means "the one and only" in Tarascan.
ISARRAITAITSOQ f Inuit Mythology
Etymology unknown. This is the name of the minor wife of the Netsilik Inuit scorpionfish god Kanajuk.
ISSITOQ m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Issitoq is a deity that punishes those who break taboos. He usually takes the form of a giant flying eye.
ITZAMNA m Mayan Mythology
Mayan God of the Sun, and leader of the Gods.
ĪTZPĀPĀLŌTL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl itztli meaning "obsidian, obsidian knife" and pāpālōtl "butterfly". This name has been translated as "clawed butterfly", perhaps in effect equal to "bat". In Aztec mythology, Ītzpāpālōtl was a skeletal warrior goddess of infant mortality and women who die in childbirth.
IXQUIC f Mayan Mythology, New World Mythology
Means "blood lady" in Quiché (Mayan), from the feminine prefix ix- combined with qiq "blood". In Mayan mythology she was the mother of the twin gods Hunahpú and Ixbalanqué.
IXTLI f New World Mythology
Diminutive of Ixtaccihuatl, which means "white woman" in Nahuatl from iztac "white" and cihuatl "woman". This was the name of a beautiful princess in Mexican legend who fell in love with the hero Popo, but died of grief when a messenger falsely reported that her lover had died in war... [more]
JANDIRA f Portuguese (Brazilian), New World Mythology
From the name of a sea goddess worshipped by the Bakairi people of Brazil, who speak a Carib language. This has been used as Brazilian given name since the 20th century.
JASY f Tupí (Rare), Guarani, New World Mythology
A Tupi name derived from îá "moon" and sy "mother". Its Guarani cognate jasy means "moon".... [more]
JUSKAHA m New World Mythology
Sapling, the younger twin brother of Othagwenda (Flint), culture heroes of the Seneca. They were born to a young woman magically impregnated by the West Wind. Flint was cast out by his grandmother who hated him, but Juskaha went looking for him and found him in a hollow tree, and took him back home where they grew up together... [more]
KADLU f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Kadlu refers to either one goddess or three sisters who presided over thunder.
KA-HA-SI m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Ka-Ha-Si was a lazy Inuit boy who was shunned by his tribe for his constant sleeping.
KANENE SKI AMAI YEHI f New World Mythology
Means "spider grandmother" in Cherokee. It is the name of the Cherokee goddess who brought the sun to the world.
KAUGÚNAĸ m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "one who was buried in-between rocks".
KEELUT m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Keelut is an evil chthonic spirit who resembles a hairless dog.
KIANTO m Mayan Mythology
The Lacandon Maya god of foreigners and diseases.
KIGATILIK m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Kigatilik is a vicious, violent demon, especially known for killing shamans.
KIVIUQ m Inuit Mythology
Kiviuq is the hero of epic stories of the Inuit of the Arctic regions of northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland. Kiviuq is an eternal Inuit wanderer.
KOKYANGWUTI f New World Mythology
Hopi creator goddess whose name means "spider grandmother".
LICARAYEN f Mapuche, New World Mythology
Composed of Mapuche lica meaning "stone" and rayen "flower" (compare Rayen). In legend the beautiful maiden Licarayen sacrificed herself in order to stop the wrath of the evil spirit of the volcano Osorno from destroying her people; it was from the ashes and snow of her sacrifice that Lake Llanquihue in Chile was created.
MAHETSI m & f New World Mythology
from hñahñú language HEAVEN, SKY
MAKA f Sioux, New World Mythology
Means "earth, ground, soil" in Lakota. In Oglala Lakota (Sioux) mythology, Makȟá (less correctly spelled Maka) was created by Íŋyaŋ ("stone"), then given the spirit Makȟá-akáŋl ("earth goddess").
MALINA f Inuit Mythology, Greenlandic
In Inuit mythology, Malina is the name of a solar goddess. She is constantly fleeing from her brother, the moon god Igaluk (Inuit) or Anningan (Grenlandic), and their eternal chase explains the movement of the sun and moon through the sky.
MAXIMÓN m Mayan Mythology (Hispanicized)
A Mayan deity and folk saint in Guatemala. ... [more]
MICTĒCACIHUĀTL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Mictlan, the Aztec afterlife, and Nahuatl cihuātl meaning "woman, lady". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of the dead and the underworld.
MULAC m New World Mythology
Mayan mythological name representing the North and the colour white. One of the Bacabs, gods representing North, South, East, and West. Associated with: Cauac, Kan, and Ix.
NA'ASHJÉ'ÍÍ ASDZÁÁ f New World Mythology
A benevolent Navajo deity whose name comes from naʼashjéʼii meaning "spider" and asdzáán meaning "woman".
NANCY f New World Mythology
from NAHUATL Nantzin, means my lovely mother, refference to Earth mother Tonantzin godess
NEGAFOOK m New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Negafook is a god of weather systems, particularly wintry cold ones.
NERRIVIK f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
The Inuit goddess of the sea and sea animals.
NIBEN f Abenaki, Algonquian, New World Mythology
The Abenaki word for "summer." Niben was also a figure in Abenaki myth who represented the summer season.
NICTÉ f Yucatec Maya, New World Mythology, Spanish (Latin American)
Means "mayflower" in Yucatec Maya.
NOOTAIKOK m New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Nootaikok was a god who presided over icebergs and glaciers.
NUJALIK f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Nujalik is the goddess of hunting on land. She is the opposite of the goddess of sea, Sedna.
NULIAJUK f Inuit Mythology
Inuit goddess of the sea and sea animals, also known as Sedna.
ONATAH f New World Mythology
In Iroquois mythology, Onatah was one of the Deohako (the Life Supporters, or Three Sisters.) Onatah represented the spirit of the corn, while her two sisters represented beans and squash. In one common Iroquois legend, Onatah was stolen by Tawiscara and hidden underground, causing a great famine until she was found and freed... [more]
ORENDA f & m New World Mythology
Orenda roughly translates into "Great Spirit", "divine essence", "Holy Spirit", or simply "God" in Iroquois.... [more]
OTHAGWENDA m New World Mythology
Sapling, the older twin brother of Juskaha, culture heroes of the Seneca. They were born to a young woman magically impregnated by the West Wind. Flint was cast out by his grandmother who hated him, but Juskaha went looking for him and found him in a hollow tree, and took him back home where they grew up together... [more]
PAALIAQ m Inuit Mythology
a fictional shaman in the book The Curse of the Shaman, written by Michael Kusugak, who supplied Kavelaars with the names of giants from Inuit mythology that were used for other Saturnian moons.
PANA m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Pana was the god who cared for souls in the underworld (Adlivun) before they were reincarnated.... [more]
PIATÃ m New World Mythology, Tupí
Means "strong" in Tupi.
PINGA f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
Means "the one who is up on high". Pinga was an Inuit goddess of the hunt, fertility and medicine. She was also the psychopomp, bringing souls of the newly-dead to Adlivun, the underworld.... [more]
POPO m New World Mythology
Short form of Popocatepetl, which means "smoking mountain" in Nahuatl from popoca "it smokes" and tepetl "mountain". This is the name of a hero in Mexican legend and Aztec mythology, the lover of Princess Ixtli... [more]
POPOCATEPETL m Folklore, New World Mythology, Aztec and Toltec Mythology
According to the legend, at the beginning of history, when the Aztecs arrived in the Valley of Anahuac, before the mountains had reached their permanent form, a beautiful princess named Mixtli was born, in the city of Tenochtitlan... [more]
POTIRA f New World Mythology, Tupi
Means "flower" in Tupi.
PUKKEENEGAK f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Pukkeenegak is a goddess of children, pregnancy, childbirth and the making of clothes.
QAAMMATIP-INUA m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "man in the moon". This is the name of a character in Greenlandic mythology.
QAMAITS f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of a Nuxalk warrior goddess associated with death, beginnings, creation, earthquakes, forest fires, and sickness.
QIQIRN m & f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Qiqirn is a large, bald dog spirit.
QUAOAR m & f New World Mythology, Astronomy
Also known as Chingichngish, Ouiamot, Tobet and Saor, Quaoar is the name of an important figure in the mythology of the so-called Mission Indians of coastal Southern California, a group of Takic-speaking peoples, today divided into the Payomkowishum (Luiseño), Tongva (Gabrieliño and Fernandeño), and Acjachemem (Juaneño) tribes or peoples... [more]
QUILLA f Incan Mythology (Spanish)
Hispanicized form of Killa. In Inca mythology Mama Quilla or Mama Killa was the goddess of the moon, worshipped in particular by women and often represented by a disc made of either gold or silver... [more]
QUISSIK m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "urinated on" in Greenlandic. Quissik was the name of a shaman, still remembered in local legends, who acquired that name when foxes in human figure urinated on him.
RAPHI f Quechua (?), Incan Mythology (?)
Means "petal" in Quechua.
RUDÁ m New World Mythology, Portuguese (Brazilian), Tupí
He is the god of love in the mythology of the Tupí and Guaraní peoples of South America.
SANNA f Inuit Mythology
Inuktitut form of Sedna.
SERRIN m New World Mythology
A new world mythology name meaning traitor, deciever
SOFANA f New World Mythology
Nicaragua-spanish... [more]
SUNGULA f Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Greenlandic name meaning "sun". Sungula is the name for the sun in East Greenlandic legends
TAINÃ-KAN m & f New World Mythology, Tupi, Guarani
Means "great star" in Tupi-Guaraní.... [more]
TAKÁNAKAPSÂLUK f Inuit Mythology
Etymology unknown. This is the Igloolik name of Sedna.
TEKKEITSERTOK m Inuit Mythology
The name of one of the most important hunting gods in the Inuit pantheon. Tekkeitsertok is a god of hunting and the master of caribou.
TEMAZCALTECI f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl temāzcalli meaning "steam bath" and tecitl "grandmother". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of steam baths.
TENOCH m New World Mythology, Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Of the Nahuatl language (also known as Aztec or Mexica). Combination or compund word meaning Tetl, or "rock/stone" and Nochtli, or "prickly pear cactus." Tenoch was an Aztec warrior/ruler who, according to legend, was given a vision in which he saw an eagle atop a cactus plant with a snake in its mouth... [more]
TOCI f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "our grandmother". The name of an Aztec goddess of cleansing and healing, venerated by healers and midwives. She was also a goddess of war.
TŌNACĀCIHUĀTL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl tōnac meaning "abundance" and cihuātl "woman, lady". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of fertility.
TONANTZIN f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "our dear mother" in Nahuatl. It is the title of the Aztec mother goddess.
TONATIUH m Nahuatl, Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "sun" in Nahuatl. This is the name of the Aztec sun god.
TOOTEGA f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology the goddess Tootega is a wizened old woman who lives in a stone hut and walks on water.
TORNARSUK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Tornarsuk is a god of the underworld and head of the protective gods known as the tornat.
TORNGASOAK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Torngasoak is a very powerful sky god, one of the more important deities in the Inuit pantheon. Leader of the Tornat.
TRAHLYTA f Cherokee (?), New World Mythology (?), Folklore
The name of a legendary Cherokee princess.
TSEEVEYO m Native American, Hopi, New World Mythology
He is a kind of monster: a terrible ogre who comes to get Hopi children if they're bad!
TSÉGHÁDIʼNÍDÍINII ATʼÉÉD f New World Mythology, Navajo
Means "rock crystal girl" in Navajo, composed of tséghádiʼńdínii "rock crystal" and atʼééd "girl, maiden". This is the name of a character in the creation myth of Navajo mythology.
TSICHTINAKO f New World Mythology
Keresan goddess whose name means "thought woman".
TULUGAAK m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Tulugaak was the creator of light.
TZITZIMITL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Etymology unknown. In Aztec mythology, this was the name of a number of demonic deities linked to stars, eclipses and fertility.
WAKANDA f Literature, New World Mythology
Used by J.K. Rowling in her 'Harry Potter' series of books as a personal name for a minor female character, perhaps due to its similarity to Wanda, taken from the form of Wakan Tanka used by the Omaha people... [more]
WENTSHUKUMISHITEU m & f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Wentshukumishiteu is a water-elemental spirit which fiercely protected the young of various animal species from human hunters.
WICADITH m Incan Mythology (Anglicized, Rare)
Means "shiny" in ancient Tulalip-inca tribe scripts,as in Bagobago 1,87: "With thee shall be the song of the wekkadeth birds"
WÓȞPE f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of a Lakota goddess of peace who was associated with falling stars.
XBALANQUE m Mayan Mythology
The name of one of the hero twins in the Mayan Popul Vuh. He defeated the underworld gods with his brother, Hunahpu.
XDAN m & f New World Mythology
From ancient mixtec, a mexican language
XELAS m New World Mythology
The Transformer was a pre-eminent spirit-being in many of the belief systems of the Pacific Northwest Coast and among some Interior peoples in the same part of the continent. Often appearing as more than one being, and seen in the plural as Transformers, the name of this/these being(s) varies from people to people, though all Coast Salish names are similar: in Skwxwu7mesh, the name is Xáays and in their tradition there were not one Transformer, but more than one, referred to as the Transformer Brothers; in Halkomelem, the name is Xa:ls; and in Lummi, the name of the Transformer is Xelas, sometimes Xe'las
XILONEN f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
The Aztec maize-goddess, called "the hairy-one" referring to the hair-like tassels of the corn.
XIPE m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "flayed one". A god of spring.
XIUHTECUHTLI m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Xiuhtecuhtli, "old god", is the senior-deity of the Aztec pantheon.
XOCOTL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Xocotl is the Aztec god of fire and of the stars.
XOLOTL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
In Aztec and Toltec mythology, Xolotl is the god of lightning who guides the dead to the Mictlan. The Aztec regard him as the twin brother of Quetzalcoatl. As lord of the evening star and personification of Venus, he pushes the sun at sunset towards the ocean and guards her during the night on her dangerous journey through the underworld... [more]
XTABAY f Mayan Mythology
This is the name of a female demon in Mayan legend.
YACATECUHTLI m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Aztec god of travelling merchants.
YANAULUHA m New World Mythology
The great medicine man of the Zuni. He is associated with civilization, agriculture, animal husbandry, social life, healing and knowledge.
YEHL m New World Mythology, Tlingit
The Tlingit creator-god, the bringer of culture as well as a trickster. He stole fire and gave it to humankind. Assuming the shape of a large raven, he flew over the primal fog and dissipated it with his wings until the first lands emerged... [more]
YEITSO m Navajo, New World Mythology
A fearsome man-eating giant in Navajo myth. He is one of the monstrous anaye.
YIMANTUWINGYAI m New World Mythology
A culture hero of the Hupa (California) and the one who established world order. He was the leader of the beings (the Kihunai) who inhabited the world before the Hupa. He combined trickiness and eroticism with heroic qualities... [more]
YOHUALTICETL f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl yohualli meaning "night". This was the name of an Aztec goddess who governed the moon and guarded children.
YOSKEHA m New World Mythology
The principal deity of the Iroquois, creator of everything good.