Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine or unisex; and the origin is Danish or Dutch or English or Finnish or French or German or Irish or Italian or Judeo-Christian Legend or Literature or Norwegian or Scandinavian or Scottish or Swedish or Welsh.
gender
usage
AATOS m Finnish
Means "thought" in Finnish.
ABADDON m Biblical
Means "ruin, destruction" in Hebrew. In Revelation in the New Testament this is another name of the angel of the abyss.
ABBÁN m Irish
Means "little abbot", derived from Irish abb "abbot" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, the son of King Cormac of Leinster.
ABEDNEGO m Biblical
Means "servant of Nebo" in Akkadian, Nebo being the Babylonian god of wisdom. In the Old Testament Abednego is the Babylonian name given to Azariah, one of the three men cast into a blazing furnace but saved from harm by God, as told in the Book of Daniel.
ACE (1) m English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
ACHAN m Biblical
Possibly a variation of the Hebrew word עֲכָר ('akhar) meaning "trouble". In the Old Testament, Achan is stoned to death because he steals forbidden items during the assault on Jericho.
ACHIM (2) m Biblical
Possibly means "he will establish" in Hebrew. In the New Testament this name is listed as an ancestor of Jesus.
ADAIR m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ADDISON f & m English
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
ADINO m Biblical
Means "ornament" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of King David's mighty men.
ÁEDÁN m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.
ÁEDH m Ancient Irish
Variant of ÁED.
AENGUS m Irish
Variant of AONGHUS.
AERON m & f Welsh
Derived either from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of the River Aeron in Wales.
AFON f & m Welsh
Means "river" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
AHTI m Finnish, Estonian, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
AIDAN m Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AILBHE f & m Irish
Possibly derived from the old Irish root albho meaning "white" or ail meaning "rock". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint, the founder of a monastery at Emly.
AILILL m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
AILPEIN m Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of ALPIN.
AIMO m Finnish
Means "generous amount" in Finnish.
AINSLEY f & m Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALBY m Irish
Anglicized masculine form of AILBHE.
ALDEN m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALED m Welsh
From the name of a Welsh river, of uncertain meaning.
ALGER m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ALGERNON m English
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy).
ALLISON f & m English
From the middle of the 20th century this has primarily been used as a variant of the feminine name ALISON. However, prior to that it was used as an uncommon masculine name, derived from the English and Scottish surname ALLISON.
ALLON m Biblical
Means "oak" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
ALPHA f & m English
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
ALPIN m Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ailpein, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
ALTON m English
From an Old English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
ALVA (2) m English
Variant of ALVAH. A famous bearer of this name was the inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
ALVAH m Biblical
Means "his highness" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned in the Old Testament as belonging to a descendant of Esau.
ALWYN m Welsh
From the name of the River Alwen in Wales.
AMAL (2) m Biblical
Means "work" in Hebrew. This was the name of an Asherite in the Old Testament.
AMI (1) m Biblical
Means "trustworthy, reliable" in Hebrew. This was the name of a servant of King Solomon in the Old Testament.
AMIS m Medieval English, Medieval French
Medieval name, a masculine form of AMICE. It appears in the medieval French poem Amis and Amiles, about two friends who make sacrifices for one another.
AMLETO m Italian
Italian form of HAMLET.
AMYAS m English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
ANDERSON m English
From a surname meaning "son of ANDREW".
ANEIRIN m Welsh
Welsh name, originally spelled Neirin, which possibly means "noble". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet.
ANEURIN m Welsh
Variant of ANEIRIN.
ANGUS m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANSEL m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).
ANSON m English
From a surname meaning "son of AGNES".
AODH m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
AODHAGÁN m Irish, Scottish
Diminutive of AODH.
AODHÁN m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán meaning "little fire", a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AONGHAS m Scottish
Scottish variant of AONGHUS.
AONGHUS m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly meaning "one strength" derived from Irish óen "one" and gus "force, strength, energy". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was the Irish god of love and youth. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king and several Irish kings.
ARAGORN m Literature
Meaning unexplained, though the first element is presumably Sindarin ara "noble, kingly". This is the name of a character in The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien. In the book Aragorn is the heir of the Dúnedain kings of the north.
ARAMIS m Literature
The surname of one of the musketeers in The Three Musketeers (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on the 17th-century Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits (itself from Basque aran meaning "valley").
ARAN (1) f & m Irish
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
ARAWN m Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the god of the underworld, called Annwfn, in Welsh mythology.
ARCANGELO m Italian
Means "archangel" in Italian.
ARCHER m English
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ARDAL m Irish
Anglicized form of ARDGHAL.
ARDEN m & f English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".
ARDGHAL m Irish
Means "high valour", derived from the Irish elements ard "high" and gal "valour".
ARDITO m Italian
Derived from medieval Italian ardito "bold".
ARELI m Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
ARETAS m Biblical
Greek form of an Aramaic name, of unknown meaning. This was the name of four Nabataean kings of Petra in Jordan, including the first king (2nd century BC). King Aretas IV is mentioned briefly in the New Testament.
ARIDAI m Biblical
Meaning unknown, possibly of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the ten sons of Haman killed by the Jews.
ARIN f & m English (Rare)
Variant of ERIN or AARON.
ARLEN m English
Meaning unknown, possibly from a surname.
ARLIE f & m English
Diminutive of ARLINE and other names beginning with Arl.
ARLO m English
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
ARLOTTO m Medieval Italian
Medieval Italian name, recorded in Latin as Arlotus. It is possibly from Old French herlot meaning "vagabond, tramp".
ARMAS m Finnish
Means "beloved" in Finnish (an archaic poetic word).
ARMEL m Breton, French
Breton and French form of the Brythonic name Arthmael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince, chieftain". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARMO m Finnish (Rare)
Means "grace, mercy" in Finnish.
ARRAN m Scottish
From the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde.
ART m English
Short form of ARTHUR.
ARTAIR m Scottish
Scottish form of ARTHUR.
ARTHFAEL m Ancient Welsh
Welsh form of ARMEL.
ARTHMAEL m Ancient Welsh
Old Welsh form of ARMEL.
ARTHUR m English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.... [more]
ARTIE m & f English
Diminutive and feminine form of ARTHUR.
ARTO m Finnish
Finnish short form of ARTHUR.
ARTTU m Finnish
Finnish short form of ARTHUR.
ARTTURI m Finnish
Finnish form of ARTHUR.
ARTÚR m Hungarian
Hungarian form of ARTHUR.
ARTŪRAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ARTHUR.
ARTURO m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ARTHUR.
ARTŪRS m Latvian
Latvian form of ARTHUR.
ARVEL m English
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of ARWEL.
ARVO m Finnish, Estonian
Means "value, worth" in Finnish and Estonian.
ARWEL m Welsh
Old Welsh name of unknown meaning.
ARWYN m Welsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, fair".
ARZHEL m Breton
Breton form of ARMEL.
ASH m & f English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEY f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. It reached its height of popularity in America in 1987, but it did not become the highest ranked name until 1991, being overshadowed by the likewise-popular Jessica until then. In the United Kingdom it is still more common as a masculine name.
ASHTON m & f English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name that meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASTON m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ASTOR m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
ATHOL m & f Scottish
From the name of a district in Scotland that was derived from Gaelic ath Fodhla "new Ireland".
AUDLEY m English
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AULIS m Finnish
Means "willing, helpful" in Finnish.
AVERILL m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY m & f English
From a surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AVTANDIL m Georgian, Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic The Knight in the Panther's Skin. Rustaveli based it on Persian آفتاب (aftab) meaning "sunshine" and دل (del) meaning "heart". In the poem Avtandil is a knight who is sent by Tinatin to search for the mysterious knight of the title.
AVTO m Georgian
Short form of AVTANDIL.
AYLMER m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of ELMER.
AZAZEL m Biblical
Means "scapegoat" in Hebrew. This is the name of the recipient of a sacrificial goat in the Old Testament. The identity of Azazel is not clear; it may in fact be the name of the place where the goat is to be sacrificed, or it may be the name of some sort of evil desert demon.
AZEL m Biblical
Means "reserved" in Hebrew. This is both the name of a minor character and a place name in the Old Testament.
BAILEY m & f English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BAIRRE m Irish
Diminutive of FIONNBHARR or BARRFHIONN.
BAKER m English (Modern)
From an English occupational surname derived from Old English bakere meaning "baker".
BALFOUR m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, originally from various place names, which meant "village pasture" in Gaelic.
BARCLAY m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
BARLAAM m Judeo-Christian Legend
Meaning unknown. In Christian legends Barlaam (recorded as Greek Βαρλαάμ) was a 3rd-century hermit who converted Josaphat, the son of an Indian king, to Christianity. The story is based on that of the Buddha. This name was also borne by two saints.
BARRA m Irish
Variant of BAIRRE.
BARRET m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of BARRETT.
BARRETT m English
From a surname probably meaning "strife" in Middle English, originally given to a quarrelsome person.
BARRFHIONN m Irish
Means "fair hair", derived from Gaelic barr "head" and fionn "white, fair".
BARRFIND m Irish
Older form of BARRFHIONN.
BARRIE m Irish, English
Variant of BARRY.
BARRY m Irish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BAXTER m English
From an occupational surname that meant "(female) baker" in Old English.
BAYARD m Literature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
BEARACH m Irish
Variant of BERACH.
BEATHAN m Scottish
Derived from Scottish Gaelic beatha meaning "life".
BEAU m & f English, Dutch
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.... [more]
BEAUDEN m English (New Zealand, Modern)
Elaboration of French beau "beautiful", using the popular den suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name has become popular in New Zealand due to rugby player Beauden Barrett (1991-).
BEAUMONT m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
BEAUREGARD m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
BEAVIS m Popular Culture
Variant of BEVIS. This name was used in the animated television program Beavis and Butthead.
BECKETT m English (Modern)
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BECKHAM m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "Becca's homestead" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname is retired English soccer player David Beckham (1975-).
BEDIVERE m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Bedwyr, which is of unknown meaning. In Arthurian legends Bedivere was one of the original companions of King Arthur. He first appears in early Welsh tales, and his story was later expanded by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century. He is the one who throws the sword Excalibur into the lake at the request of the dying Arthur.
BELLAMY f & m English (Modern)
From a surname derived from Old French bel ami meaning "beautiful friend".
BENSON m English
From a surname that originally meant "son of BENEDICT".
BENTLEY m English
From a surname that was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BENVENUTO m Italian
Means "welcome" in Italian. A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance sculptor and writer Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571).
BENVOLIO m Literature
Means "good will" in Italian. This name was used by Shakespeare for a friend of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596). The character had been created earlier by the Italian writer Matteo Bandello, whose play Giuletta e Romeo (1554) was one of Shakespeare's sources.
BERACH m Irish
Derived from Irish biorach meaning "sharp". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
BERLIN f & m Various
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BERRY (1) m English
Variant of BARRY.
BERWYN m Welsh
Means "fair head" from the Welsh elements barr "head" and gwyn "white, fair".
BEVAN m Welsh
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Evan meaning "son of EVAN".
BEVERLY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark.
BEVIS m English (Rare)
From an English surname that is possibly derived from the name of the French town Beauvais.
BIFF m English (Rare)
From a nickname that was based on the English word biff, which means "punch, hit, strike".
BILBO m Literature
This was the name of the hero of The Hobbit (1937) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His real hobbit name was Bilba, which is of unknown meaning, but this was altered by Tolkien in order to use the more masculine o ending. In the novel Bilbo Baggins was recruited by the wizard Gandalf to join the quest to retake Mount Erebor from the dragon Smaug.
BIRKIR m Icelandic
From Icelandic birki meaning "birch", specifically the downy birch (species Betula pubescens).
BISHOP m English
Either from the English occupational surname, or else directly from the English word. It is ultimately derived from Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer".
BJARKI m Icelandic
Masculine form of BJÖRK.
BLAINE m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BLAIR m & f Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLAKE m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLAZE m English (Modern)
Modern variant of BLAISE influenced by the English word blaze.
BLEDDYN m Welsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
BLYTHE f & m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
BODHI m English (Modern)
From a term referring to enlightenment in Buddhism, derived from Sanskrit बोधि (bodhi).
BONACCORSO m Italian (Rare)
From a medieval Italian name derived from bono "good" and accorso "haste, rush, help".
BONAVENTURA m Italian
Means "good fortune" in Italian. Saint Bonaventura was a 13th-century Franciscan monk who is considered a Doctor of the Church.
BOOKER m English
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
BOONE m English
From an English surname that was either derived from Old French bon meaning "good" or from the name of the town of Bohon, France.
BOYCE m English
From a surname that was derived from Old French bois "wood".
BOYD m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute.
BRAD m English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRÁDACH m Irish
Possibly derived from a Gaelic word meaning "large-chested".
BRADÁN m Ancient Irish
Means "salmon" in Irish.
BRADEN m English, Irish
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRADFORD m English
From a surname that originally came from a place name that meant "broad ford" in Old English.
BRADLEY m English
From a surname that originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BRADY m English, Irish
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRAIDY m & f English (Rare)
Variant of BRADY.
BRAITH m English (Australian)
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled".
BRAJAN m Polish (Modern)
Polish form of BRIAN.
BRAN (1) m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2) m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRAND m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANDEN m English
Variant of BRANDON.
BRANDON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
BRANDT m English
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANNON m English
From an Irish surname derived from Mac Branain, which means "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BRANSON m English (Modern)
From an English surname that meant "son of BRANDR".
BRANT m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name BRANDR. This is also the name for a variety of wild geese.
BRANTLEY m English (Modern)
From a surname, an Americanized form of the German surname Brändle, ultimately from Old High German brant "fire".
BRAXTON m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Bracca's town" in Old English.
BRAYAN m Spanish (Modern)
Spanish form of BRIAN.
BRAYLON m English (Modern)
An invented name, using the same sounds found in names such as Braden and Jalen.
BRÉANAINN m Ancient Irish
Old Irish form of BRENDAN.
BREANDÁN m Irish
Irish Gaelic form of BRENDAN.
BRENDAN m Irish, English, Breton
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENDANUS m Irish (Latinized)
Latinized form of Bréanainn (see BRENDAN).
BRENDEN m English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENDON m English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENNAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRENT m English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BRENTON m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name meaning "Bryni's town". Bryni was Old English name meaning "fire".
BRET m English
Variant of BRETT.
BRETT m English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAN m English, Irish, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BRIAR m & f English (Modern)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRIDGER m English (Modern)
From an English surname that originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.
BRIGHAM m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "bridge settlement" in Old English.
BRION m English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRISCOE m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
BRITTON m English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROCK m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BRODY m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BROGAN m & f Irish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
BRONTE m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
BROOK m & f English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKLYN f & m English (Modern)
From the name of a borough of New York City, originally named after the Dutch town of Breukelen, itself meaning either "broken land" (from Dutch breuk) or "marsh land" (from Dutch broek). It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn. It is considered a feminine name in the United States, but is more common as a masculine name in the United Kingdom.
BROOKS m English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BRUCE m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. A notable bearer is the American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-).
BRYAN m English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYANT m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYN m & f Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNMOR m Welsh
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
BRYON m English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BUCK m English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUD m English
Short form of BUDDY.
BUDDY m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BURKE m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
BURT m English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON m English
From a surname that was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
BUSTER m English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust, a dialectal variant of burst. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
BUZ m Biblical
Means "contempt" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of ABRAHAM's brother Nahor in the Old Testament.
BYRNE m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BYRON m English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of Don Juan and many other works.
BYSSHE m English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
CADE m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
CADELL m Welsh
From Welsh cad "battle" and a diminutive suffix.
CADEN m English (Modern)
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Irish Gaelic Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable den suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
CADEYRN m Ancient Welsh
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CADFAEL m Welsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
CADFAN m Welsh
Means "battle peak" from Welsh cad "battle" and ban "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
CADOC m Welsh
Derived from Welsh cad meaning "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADOGAN m Welsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CADWALADER m Welsh
Means "leader of the battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a Welsh saint of the 7th century.
CADWGAN m Welsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CÁEL m Irish Mythology
From Irish caol meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CAELAN m & f English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAERWYN m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
CAHAL m Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAL.
CAHIR m Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAIR.
CAIAPHAS m Biblical
Meaning unknown, probably of Aramaic origin. In the New Testament this is the name of the Jewish high priest who condemns Jesus.
CAILEAN m Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAINNEACH m Irish
Irish form of COINNEACH.
CAIRBRE m Irish
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
CAIRO m English (Modern)
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
CAISIDE m Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
CAL m English
Short form of CALVIN.
CALBHACH m Irish
Means "bald" in Irish Gaelic.
CALLAHAN m English
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".
CALLAN m English
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Cathaláin, which means "descendant of CATHALÁN".
CALVAGH m Irish
Anglicized form of CALBHACH.
CALVIN m English
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
CAM (2) m & f English
Short form of CAMERON.
CAMDEN m English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from a place name, perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAMERON m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMPBELL m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CANAAN m Biblical
Meaning unknown. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor of the Canaanite people.
CAOIMHÍN m Irish
Irish form of KEVIN.
CAOLÁN m Irish
From Irish caol meaning "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
CAOMH m Ancient Irish
Masculine form of CAOIMHE.
CAOMHÁN m Ancient Irish
Diminutive of CAOMH. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CARBREY m Irish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARBRY m Irish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CAREY m & f English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARLISLE m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
CARLTON m English
Variant of CHARLTON.
CARLYLE m English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARMELO m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMI m Biblical
Means "vine" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Reuben in the Old Testament.
CARON f & m Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CARRAN m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of CORRAIDHÍN".
CARROL m & f English
Variant of CARROLL (masculine) or CAROL (1) (feminine).
CARROLL m Irish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
CARSON m & f English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).