Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Dutch; and the first letter is J.
gender
usage
letter
Jaak m Estonian, Flemish
Estonian form of Jacob or James, and a Flemish short form of Jacob.
Jaap m Dutch
Short form of Jacob.
Jacob m English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
Jacobus m Dutch, Late Roman
Latin form of Jacob, also used in Dutch.
Jakob m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Slovene
Form of Jacob (or James) used in several languages.
Jan 1 m Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan, Sorbian
Form of Johannes used in various languages. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painters Jan Vermeer and Jan Steen.
Jasper m English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Jef m Dutch
Dutch short form of Jozef.
Jelle m Frisian, Dutch
Originally a Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element gild "sacrifice, value". It can also be a Dutch diminutive of Willem.
Jeroen m Dutch
Dutch form of Hieronymos (see Jerome).
Jesse m English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
Jip m & f Frisian, Dutch
Frisian short form of Germanic names such as Gijsbert or Gijsberta. This is the name of a boy in the Dutch children's book series Jip and Janneke, first published 1952.
Jo f & m English, German, Dutch, Norwegian
Short form of Joan 1, Joanna, Josephine and other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German, Dutch and Norwegian, short for Johannes or Josef.
Job m Biblical, Biblical French, Dutch
From the Hebrew name אִיּוֹב ('Iyyov), which means "persecuted, hated". In the Book of Job in the Old Testament he is a righteous man who is tested by God, enduring many tragedies and hardships while struggling to remain faithful.
Jochem m Dutch
Dutch form of Joachim.
Jodocus m Dutch (Archaic), Medieval Breton (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see Joyce).
Joël m French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of Joel.
Joep m Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Jozef.
Joeri m Dutch
Dutch form of Yuriy.
Johan m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Scandinavian and Dutch form of Iohannes (see John).
Johannes m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Greek Ioannes (see John). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
John m English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰωάννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "Yahweh is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.... [more]
Jonas 2 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ἰωνᾶς (Ionas), the Greek form of Jonah. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
Jonathan m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "Yahweh has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
Joop m Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Johannes or Jozef.
Joord m Dutch (Rare)
Dutch diminutive of Jordan.
Joos m Dutch
Dutch short form of Jodocus, Justus or Jozef.
Joost m Dutch
Dutch form of Iudocus (see Joyce), sometimes used as a diminutive of Justus or Jozef.
Jordaan m Dutch (Rare)
Dutch form of Jordan.
Joris m Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of George.
Jos m Dutch
Dutch short form of Jozef.
Josephus m Dutch, History
Latin form of Joseph. As a Dutch name, it is used on birth certificates though a vernacular form such as Jozef is typically used in daily life. In English, it is used primarily to refer to the 1st-century Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus.
Jozef m Slovak, Dutch
Slovak and Dutch form of Joseph.
Jozua m Dutch (Rare)
Dutch form of Joshua.
Judocus m Dutch (Archaic), Medieval Breton (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see Joyce).
Julius m Ancient Roman, English, German, Finnish, Lithuanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Greek ἴουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god Jupiter. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
Jurgen m Dutch
Dutch form of George.
Jurriaan m Dutch
Dutch form of George.
Justus m German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Latin name meaning "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
Juul f & m Dutch
Dutch short form of Julia or Julius.