Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the usage is English; and the pattern is *e; and the number of syllables is 1.
gender
usage
pattern
syllables
Abe 1 m English
Short form of Abraham.
Ace 1 m English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
Anne 1 f French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of Anna. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.... [more]
Bee f English
Short form of Beatrix and other names beginning with B.
Belle f English
Short form of Isabella or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.
Bette f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth. A famous bearer was American actress Bette Davis (1908-1989).
Blaine m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Irish given name Bláán.
Blake m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827). It was originally a mainly masculine name but in 2007 actress Blake Lively (1987-) began starring in the television series Gossip Girl, after which time it increased in popularity for girls.
Blanche f French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
Blaze m English (Modern)
Modern variant of Blaise influenced by the English word blaze.
Blue m & f English (Rare)
From the English word for the colour, derived via Norman French from a Frankish word (replacing the native Old English cognate blaw). Despite the fact that this name was used by the American musicians Beyoncé and Jay-Z in 2012 for their first daughter, it has not come into general use in the United States.
Blythe f & m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
Boone m English
From an English surname that was either derived from Old French bon meaning "good" or from the name of the town of Bohon, France.
Boyce m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old French bois "wood".
Bree f English
Anglicized form of Brígh. It can also be a short form of Brianna, Gabriella and other names containing bri.
Brice m French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
Brooke f English
Variant of Brook. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
Bruce m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in the 1940s and 50s. Notable bearers include Chinese-American actor Bruce Lee (1940-1973), American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-), and American actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
Bryce m English
Variant of Brice.
Burke m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
Byrne m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Broin, which was derived from the given name Bran 1.
Bysshe m English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
Cade m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
Cale m English
Short form of Caleb.
Case m English (Modern)
Short form of Casey.
Cate f English (Rare)
Variant of Kate. A famous bearer is Australian actress Cate Blanchett (1969-).
Chance m English
Originally a diminutive of Chauncey. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
Chase m English
From an English surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
Chelle f English
Diminutive of Michelle.
Claire f French, English
French form of Clara. This was a common name in France throughout the 20th century, though it has since been eclipsed there by Clara. It was also very popular in the United Kingdom, especially in the 1970s.
Clare f English
Medieval English form of Clara. The preferred spelling in the English-speaking world is now the French form Claire, though Clare has been fairly popular in the United Kingdom and Australia.... [more]
Claude m & f French, English
French masculine and feminine form of Claudius. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
Cleve m English
Short form of Cleveland.
Clive m English
From an English surname derived from Old English clif meaning "cliff", originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
Clyde m English
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, from Cumbric Clud, which is of uncertain origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858.
Cole m English
From an English surname, itself originally derived from either a medieval short form of Nicholas or the byname Cola. A famous bearer was the songwriter Cole Porter (1891-1964), while a bearer of the surname was the musician Nat King Cole (1919-1965).... [more]
Cree m & f English (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
Dale m & f English
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
Dane m English
From an English surname that was either a variant of the surname Dean or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
Dave m English
Short form of David.
Dee f & m English
Short form of names beginning with D. It may also be given in reference to the Dee River in Scotland.
Dene m & f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Dean or Dena.
Dewayne m English
Variant of Duane, with the spelling altered due to the influence of Wayne. It can be spelled Dewayne or with a capitalized third letter as DeWayne.
Dove f English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
Drake m English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck". A famous bearer is the Canadian actor and rapper Drake (1986-), who was born as Aubrey Drake Graham.
Duane m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dubháin, itself derived from the given name Dubhán. Usage in America began around the start of the 20th century. It last appeared on the top 1000 rankings in 2002, though the variant Dwayne lingered a few years longer.
Duke m English
From the noble title duke, which was originally derived from Latin dux "leader".
Dwayne m English
Variant of Duane, with the spelling altered due to the influence of Wayne.
Earle m English
Variant of Earl.
Elle f English (Modern)
Diminutive of Eleanor and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".... [more]
Erle 2 m English
Variant of Earl.
Eve f English, Estonian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
Fae f English
Variant of Fay.
Faye f English
Variant of Fay.
Ferne f English
Variant of Fern.
Gabe m English
Short form of Gabriel.
Gae f English (Rare)
Variant of Gay.
Gage m English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book Pet Sematary (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
Gale 1 f English
Variant of Gail.
Gale 2 m English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
Gaye 1 f English
Variant of Gay.
Gayle f & m English
Variant of Gail or Gale 2.
Gene m English
Short form of Eugene.
George m English, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεώργιος (Georgios), which was derived from the Greek word γεωργός (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γῆ (ge) meaning "earth" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Cappadocia who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
Gore m English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "triangular" (from Old English gara), originally referring to someone who lived on a triangular piece of land. A famous bearer was American writer Gore Vidal (1925-2012).
Grace f English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.... [more]
Graeme m Scottish, English
From a surname that was a variant of Graham. This particular spelling for the given name has been most common in Scotland, New Zealand and Australia.
Grahame m Scottish, English
From a surname that was a variant of Graham.
Hale 2 m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
Harve m English
Short form of Harvey.
Haze m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Hayes, sometimes used as a short form of Hazel.
Hope f English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Ike m English
Diminutive of Isaac. This was the nickname of the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), based on the initial sound of his surname.
Jace m English
Short form of Jason, sometimes used independently. It was brought to limited attention in America by the lead character in the western television series Tales of the Texas Rangers (1955-1958). Towards the end of the 20th century it began steadily increasing in popularity, reaching the 66th spot for boys in the United States in 2013.
Jade f & m English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
Jae 2 m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Jay 1.
Jake m English
Medieval variant of Jack. It is also sometimes used as a short form of Jacob.
Jane f English
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see John). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.... [more]
Jase m English (Modern)
Variant of Jace and a short form of Jason.
Jayce m English
Variant of Jace.
Jaye f & m English
Variant or feminine form of Jay 1.
Jayne f English
Variant of Jane.
Jeane f English
Variant of Jean 2.
Jeanne f French, English
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see John). This has been the most reliably popular French name for girls since the 13th century. Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
Joe m English
Short form of Joseph. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).
Joyce f & m English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also became a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
Joye f English
Variant of Joy.
Jude 1 m English, Biblical
Variant of Judas. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
Jude 2 f English
Short form of Judith.
June f English
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
Kae f English (Rare)
Variant of Kay 1.
Kane m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Catháin, derived from the given name Cathán.
Kate f English, Croatian
Diminutive of Katherine, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
Kaye f English
Variant of Kay 1.
Keefe m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh, derived from the given name or byname Caomh.
Kyle m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from various place names, themselves from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait". As a given name it was rare in the first half of the 20th century. It rose steadily in popularity throughout the English-speaking world, entering the top 50 in most places by the 1990s. It has since declined in all regions.
Lake m & f English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
Lance m English
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element landa meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
Lane m English
From an English surname, meaning "lane, path", which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
Layne m English
Variant of Lane.
Lee m & f English
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been used as a given name in the American South.
Lorne m English
From the title Marquis of Lorne, which was based on the Scottish place name Lorne, itself possibly derived from the name of the legendary king of Dál Riata, Loarn mac Eirc. This was the title of the first Governor General of Canada, where it has since been most frequently used as a given name. A famous bearer was the Canadian actor Lorne Greene (1915-1987).
Love 2 f English
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
Luke m English, Biblical
English form of Latin Lucas, from the Greek name Λουκᾶς (Loukas) meaning "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.... [more]
Lyle m English
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French l'isle meaning "island".
Lynne f English
Variant of Lynn.
Madge f English
Diminutive of Margaret.
Mae f English
Variant of May. A famous bearer was the American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
Marge f English, Estonian
Diminutive of Margaret (English) or Margareeta (Estonian).
Marje 1 f English
Diminutive of Marjorie.
Maude f English, French
Variant of Maud.
Meade m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
Merle f & m English, Estonian
Variant of Merrill or Muriel. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula). This name is also common in Estonia, though a connection to the English-language name is uncertain.
Mike m English
Short form of Michael.
Moe 1 m English
Short form of Maurice or Morris, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
Nance f English
Short form of Nancy.
Nate m English
Short form of Nathan or Nathaniel.
Nelle f English
Variant of Nell.
Pace m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
Page m & f English
From a surname that was a variant of Paige.
Paige f English
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδίον (paidion) meaning "little boy".... [more]
Peace f English (African)
From the English word peace, ultimately derived from Latin pax. This name is most common in Nigeria and other parts of Africa.
Pearle f English
Variant of Pearl.
Perce m English
Short form of Percy.
Pete m English
Short form of Peter.
Pierce m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Piers. In America this name slowly started to grow in popularity in 1982 when actor Pierce Brosnan (1953-) began starring on the television series Remington Steele.
Praise f & m English (African)
From the English word praise, which is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Late Latin preciare, a derivative of Latin pretium "price, worth". This name is most common in English-speaking Africa.
Price m English
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Rhys meaning "son of Rhys".
Prince m English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
Prue f English
Short form of Prudence.
Rae f English
Short form of Rachel. It can also be used as a feminine form of Ray.
Rafe m English
Variant of Ralph. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
Raine f & m English (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer was the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-2016), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of Rain 1 or a short form of Lorraine.
Ridge m English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word denoting a continous elevated mountain crest, or from the English surname derived from the word.
Rodge m English
Short form of Rodger.
Rose f English, French
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Royce m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of Rose.
Rube m English
Short form of Reuben.
Rue f English
From the name of the bitter medicinal herb, ultimately deriving from Greek ῥυτή (rhyte). This is also sometimes used as a short form of Ruth 1.
Sage f & m English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
Shae f & m English (Modern)
Variant of Shea.
Shane m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Seán. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
Shaye f & m English (Rare)
Variant of Shea.
Shayne m English
Variant of Shane.
Skye f English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of Sky.
Slade m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from Old English slæd meaning "valley".
Sloane f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Sluaghadháin, itself derived from the given name Sluaghadhán.
Spike m English (Rare)
From a nickname that may have originally been given to a person with spiky hair.
Stace m & f Medieval English, English
Medieval short form of Eustace. As a modern name it is typically a short form of Stacy.
Steve m English
Short form of Steven. A notable bearer was American technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011).
Stone m English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
Sue f English
Short form of Susanna.
Tate m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
Thane m English (Rare)
From the Scottish and English noble title, which was originally from Old English thegn.
Trace m English
Short form of Tracy.
Tye m English
From a surname meaning "pasture" in Middle English.
Vale f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "wide river valley".
Vance m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
Vince m English, Hungarian
English short form and Hungarian normal form of Vincent.
Wade m English
From an English surname, either Wade 1 or Wade 2.
Wayne m English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
Wolfe m English (Rare)
Variant of Wolf, influenced by the spelling of the surname (which is also derived from the animal).
Wynne 2 m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Wine.
Zane 1 m English
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name — it had been his mother's maiden name.
Zeke m English
Short form of Ezekiel.