ninjato's Personal Name List

ABILENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AB-i-leen, ab-i-LEE-nee
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament. It is probably from Hebrew אָבֵל ('avel) meaning "meadow, grassy area". It has occasionally been used as a given name in modern times.
AELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αελλα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.
AIRI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛莉, 愛梨, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-REE
Rating: 46% based on 26 votes
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
ALCIDES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Portuguese, Spanish
Other Scripts: Αλκειδης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-THEE-dhehs(European Spanish) al-SEE-dhehs(European Spanish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Greek Αλκειδης (Alkeides), derived from αλκη (alke) meaning "strength" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was another name for the hero Herakles.
ALEŠ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: A-lesh(Czech, Slovak)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of ALEXEJ or ALEKSANDER.
ALODIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Possibly from a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements alja "other, foreign" and aud "riches, wealth" [1]. Saint Alodia was a 9th-century Spanish martyr with her sister Nunilo.
AMATERASU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese Mythology
Other Scripts: 天照(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-MA-TEH-RA-SOO(Japanese)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. She was born when Izanagi washed his left eye after returning from the underworld. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня(Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Rating: 63% based on 36 votes
Russian diminutive of ANNA.
AOIFE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-fyə(Irish)
Rating: 68% based on 15 votes
Means "beauty" from the Irish word aoibh. In Irish legend Aoife was a warrior princess. In war against her sister Scathach, she was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn. Eventually she was reconciled with her sister and became the lover of Cúchulainn. This name is sometimes used as a Gaelic form of EVE or EVA.
ARACELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 49% based on 24 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARIADNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Ариадна(Russian)
Pronounced: a-RYADH-na(Spanish) ə-RYADH-nə(Catalan) a-RYAD-na(Polish)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.
ARIEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, French, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֲרִיאֵל(Hebrew) Αριηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-ree-EHL(Hebrew) EHR-ee-əl(English) AR-ee-əl(English) A-RYEHL(French) a-RYEHL(Spanish)
Rating: 53% based on 21 votes
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play The Tempest (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film The Little Mermaid (1989).
ARIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-RYEHL
Rating: 50% based on 20 votes
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: ə-RIS-tə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 17 votes
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
ARWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 75% based on 16 votes
Means "noble maiden" in Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.
ASUKA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 明日香, 飛鳥, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-SOO-KA, A-SKA
Rating: 39% based on 16 votes
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
AUBREY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWB-ree
Rating: 52% based on 18 votes
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Classical Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LEE
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
French feminine form of AURELIUS.
AVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century [1].
AYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 彩, 綾, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-YA
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
BALTHAZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 56% based on 16 votes
Variant of BELSHAZZAR. Balthazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus. He was said to have come from Arabia.
BELLONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: bə-LON-ə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin bellare meaning "to fight". This was the name of the Roman goddess of war, a companion of Mars.
BETHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From the name of a biblical town, Βηθανια (Bethania) in Greek, which is probably of Aramaic or Hebrew origin, possibly meaning "house of affliction" or "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany is the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.
BLAINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYN
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BRUCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BROOS
Rating: 45% based on 21 votes
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. A notable bearer is the American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-).
BRUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Pronounced: BROO-na(Italian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BYRON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIE-rən
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of Don Juan and many other works.
CAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Short form of CALVIN.
CALIGULA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: kə-LIG-yoo-lə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Means "little boot" in Latin. This was a nickname for the Roman emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus given to him in his youth by his father's soldiers.
CALISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə(English) ka-LEES-ta(Spanish)
Rating: 59% based on 33 votes
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALLEIGH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAL-ee
Rating: 25% based on 15 votes
Variant of CALLIE.
CALLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ee
Rating: 45% based on 34 votes
Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.
CALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 50% based on 32 votes
Latinized form of KALLIOPE.
CALLISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə
Rating: 51% based on 17 votes
Variant of CALISTA.
CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
CAMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE(French) kə-MEEL(English)
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAOIMHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CASSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-a(Classical Latin) KA-shə(English) KAS-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CÉLESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-LEST
Rating: 61% based on 16 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CELESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Rating: 65% based on 15 votes
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CHIKA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 千佳, 智佳, 千花, 智花, 散花, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: CHEE-KA
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
CICELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIS-ə-lee
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Medieval variant of CECILY.
CLAUDIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLOW-dee-oos(Classical Latin) KLAW-dee-əs(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.
CLIFF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF
Rating: 33% based on 31 votes
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLIFFORD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF-ərd
Rating: 37% based on 30 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLINT
Rating: 33% based on 30 votes
Short form of CLINTON. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
CLINTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIN-tən
Rating: 31% based on 30 votes
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
CORINNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοριννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ko-RI-na(German) kə-REEN-ə(English) kə-RIN-ə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) meaning "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book Amores. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem Corinna's going a-Maying.
DAISUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 大輔, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: DA-EE-SOO-KEH, DA-EE-SKEH
Rating: 43% based on 33 votes
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" and (suke) meaning "help". Other kanji combinations are possible.
DARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs(English) DAR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush meaning "possessing goodness", composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century. In Lithuania it may be given in honour of the Lithuanian-American aviator Steponas Darius (1896-1933), who died attempting to fly nonstop from New York to Lithuania. His surname was an Americanized form of the original Darašius.

DARRAGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DEIMOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δειμος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEH-MOS(Classical Greek) DIE-məs(English)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Means "terror" in Greek. This was one of the sons of the Greek god Ares. Also, a moon of Mars bears this name.
DELANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-ə-no
Rating: 45% based on 17 votes
From a surname, recorded as de la Noye in French, indicating that the bearer was from a place called La Noue (ultimately Gaulish meaning "wetland, swamp"). It has been used in honour of American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), whose middle name came from his mother's maiden name.
DENNIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: DEHN-is(English) DEH-nis(German, Dutch)
Rating: 44% based on 19 votes
Usual English, German and Dutch form of DENIS.
DERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Variant of DEREK.
DESMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEHZ-mənd(English)
Rating: 68% based on 13 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DRAGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Драган(Serbian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
EDMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHD-MAWN
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

EDWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "rich friend", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
ELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: eh-LEE-zə(German) eh-LEE-seh(Norwegian, Danish, Swedish) i-LEES(English) EE-lees(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Short form of ELIZABETH.
ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LAW-DEE
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
French form of ALODIA.
ELSPETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: EHLS-peth
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
ENVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Bosnian
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Turkish and Bosnian form of ANWAR.
ERIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Pronounced: eh-REE-kah(Swedish, Norwegian) EH-ree-kah(Finnish) EH-ree-ka(German, Slovak) EH-ree-kaw(Hungarian) EHR-i-kə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Classical Latin)
Rating: 63% based on 36 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FÍONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
Derived from Irish fíon meaning "wine".
FIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: fee-O-nə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 19 votes
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by the Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1762), in which it is spelled as Fióna.
FLANNERY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLAN-ə-ree
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
FRANK (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French
Pronounced: FRANGK(English, German) FRAHNGK(Dutch) FRAHNK(French)
Rating: 46% based on 17 votes
From a Germanic name that referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They possibly derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.

The name was brought to England by the Normans. Notable bearers include author L. Frank Baum (1856-1919), architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), and singer Frank Sinatra (1915-1998).

FREJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: FRIE-ah(Danish) FRAY-ah(Swedish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Danish and Swedish form of FREYA.
FREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: FRAY(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of FREYR.
GABRIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Габриела(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: gab-RYEH-la(Polish) ga-BRYEH-la(Spanish) ga-bree-EH-la(German) GA-bri-yeh-la(Czech) GA-bree-eh-la(Slovak)
Rating: 49% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ga-bree-EHL-la(Italian) GAWB-ree-ehl-law(Hungarian) ga-bree-EHL-ə(English) gah-bree-EHL-lah(Swedish)
Rating: 48% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) gab-ree-EHL(English)
Rating: 56% based on 30 votes
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GABRIJELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 41% based on 16 votes
Croatian feminine form of GABRIEL.
GALEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAY-lən
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene). It was borne by a 2nd-century BC Greco-Roman physician who contributed to anatomy and medicine. In modern times the name is occasionally given in his honour.
GILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIELZ
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
GILROY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GIOVANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-na
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Italian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of GIOVANNI.
GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEHL(French) ji-ZEHL(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GIZELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: GEE-zehl-law
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Hungarian form of GISELLE.
GORDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GAWR-dən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 33 votes
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name in Berwickshire meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GRIGOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Григор(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Գրիգոր(Armenian)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Welsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Armenian form of GREGORY. This is the name of the patron saint of Armenia (known as Saint Gregory the Illuminator in English).
GWENAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWEH-NA-EHL(French)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of GWENAËL.
HAMILCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Phoenician (Latinized), History
Pronounced: hə-MIL-kahr(English) HAM-əl-kahr(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "brother of Melqart" from Phoenician ha "brother" combined with the name of the god MELQART. Hamilcar was a 3rd-century BC Carthaginian general, the father of Hannibal.
HANNA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: Ганна(Ukrainian, Belarusian) חַנָּה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-nah(Danish) HAHN-nah(Finnish, Ukrainian) KHAN-na(Polish) HA-na(German) HAN-na(Icelandic) HAWN-naw(Hungarian)
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) in several languages.
HANNIBAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Phoenician (Latinized), History
Pronounced: HAN-i-bəl(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HARUKA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 遥, 春花, 晴香, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HA-ROO-KA
Rating: 51% based on 32 votes
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
HARVEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-vee
Rating: 31% based on 17 votes
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HUR-mən(English) HEHR-mahn(Dutch)
Rating: 38% based on 21 votes
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by an 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, though in his case the name is an alternate transcription of GERMAN. Another famous bearer was the American writer Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of Moby-Dick.
HESTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Εστια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHS-TEE-A(Classical Greek) HEHS-tee-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HIDEKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 秀樹, 英樹, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-DEH-KYEE
Rating: 45% based on 32 votes
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, outstanding" or (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" combined with (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HIROSHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 寛, 浩, 裕, 博, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-RO-SHEE
Rating: 44% based on 32 votes
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations that are read the same way.
HJALMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: YAL-mar(Swedish)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Hjálmarr meaning "helmeted warrior" from the element hjalmr "helmet" combined with arr "warrior".
HORATIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
HOWARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOW-ərd
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
From an English surname that can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
ILONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, German, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Pronounced: EE-lo-naw(Hungarian) ee-LO-na(German) EE-lo-nah(Finnish) ee-LAW-na(Polish) I-lo-na(Czech)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of HELEN. In Finland it is associated with the word ilona, a derivative of ilo "joy".
IOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Probably a variant of IOLE.
IONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ιονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-O-nee(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Ancient Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.
ISOLDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOL-də(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of ISOLDE.
IVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
Pronounced: IE-vawr(English) EE-vawr(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
IZOLDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian, Polish (Rare)
Other Scripts: იზოლდა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ee-ZAWL-da(Polish)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Georgian and Polish form of ISOLDE.
JANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Pronounced: YA-na(Czech, Slovak, German) YAH-nah(Dutch) ZHA-nə(Catalan)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of JAN (1).
JANA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јана(Serbian)
Pronounced: YA-na
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Croatian and Serbian variant of ANA.
JERRY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHR-ee
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of JEREMY, JEROME, GERALD, GERALDINE, and other names beginning with the same sound. A notable bearer was American comedian Jerry Lewis (1926-2017).
JOACHIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: ZHAW-A-KEEM(French) YO-a-khim(German) yo-A-khim(German) yaw-A-kheem(Polish) JO-ə-kim(English)
Rating: 45% based on 33 votes
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOAKIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јоаким(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: YOO-a-kim(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) YO-ah-keem(Finnish)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Scandinavian, Macedonian and Serbian form of JOACHIM.
JOCHEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YAW-khən
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
German form of JOACHIM.
JOLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-LEEN
Rating: 39% based on 14 votes
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the early 20th century. It received a boost in popularity after the release of Dolly Parton's 1973 song Jolene.
JOLYON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 34% based on 34 votes
Medieval form of JULIAN. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his Forsyte Saga novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
JOWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Cornish form of JOHN.
JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN(French) jus-TEEN(English)
Rating: 48% based on 14 votes
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel Justine (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Estonian
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of KATARINA or KATARIINA.
KAITO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 海斗, 海翔, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KA-EE-TO
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
From Japanese (kai) meaning "sea, ocean" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KAMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Polish
Pronounced: KA-mi-la(Czech) KA-mee-la(Slovak) ka-MYEE-la(Polish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Czech, Slovak and Polish form of CAMILLA.
KANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 夏菜, 夏奈, 花奈(Japanese Kanji) かな(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KAN-ə
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From Japanese 夏 (ka) "summer" or 花 (ka) meaning "flower" combined with 菜 (na) "vegetables, greens" or 奈 (na), a phonetic character. it is often written かな using the hiragana system..
KAORI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 香, 香織, etc.(Japanese Kanji) かおり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KA-O-REE
Rating: 56% based on 32 votes
From Japanese (kaori) meaning "fragrance". It can also come from an alternate reading of (ka) combined with (ori) meaning "weaving". Other kanji combinations are possible. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
KATERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian, Russian, Bulgarian, Greek, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Катерина(Macedonian, Russian, Bulgarian) Κατερινα(Greek)
Pronounced: kə-tyi-RYEE-nə(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Macedonian form of KATHERINE, a Russian short form of YEKATERINA, a Bulgarian short form of EKATERINA, and a Greek variant of AIKATERINE.
KEARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEER-ə
Rating: 33% based on 17 votes
Variant of CIARA (1).
KEELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Rating: 46% based on 8 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".
KEIKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 慶子, 敬子, 啓子, 恵子, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KEH-KO
Rating: 47% based on 31 votes
From Japanese (kei) meaning "celebrate", (kei) meaning "respect", (kei) meaning "open, begin" or (kei) meaning "favour, benefit" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEER-ə
Rating: 60% based on 20 votes
Variant of CIARA (1). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KENSHIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 謙信, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KEWN-SHEEN
Rating: 44% based on 21 votes
From Japanese (ken) meaning "humble, modest" and (shin) meaning "trust, believe". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
KIIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KEE-rah
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Finnish feminine form of CYRUS.
KIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Кира(Russian)
Pronounced: KYEE-rə
Rating: 60% based on 34 votes
Russian feminine form of CYRUS.
KIRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEER-ə
Rating: 54% based on 15 votes
Variant of CIARA (1).
KIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "skin of a tree or fruit" in Maori. This name has been brought to public attention by New Zealand opera singer Kiri Te Kanawa (1944-).
KIRK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KURK
Rating: 50% based on 17 votes
From an English and Scottish surname meaning "church" from Old Norse kirkja, ultimately from Greek. A famous bearer was American actor Kirk Douglas (1916-), whose birth name was Issur Danielovitch.
KOUKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 光希, 幸輝, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KO-KYEE
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 光希 or 幸輝 (see KŌKI).
KYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEER-ə, KIE-rə
Rating: 45% based on 10 votes
Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.
LAETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, French
Pronounced: LEH-TEE-SYA(French)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Original form of LETITIA, as well as a French variant.
LARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Лара(Russian)
Pronounced: LAHR-ə(English) LA-ra(German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch) LA-RA(French) LA-ru(Portuguese)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Latvian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Лариса(Russian, Ukrainian) Λαρισα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lu-RYEE-sə(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient city of Larisa in Thessaly, which meant "citadel". In Greek legends, the nymph Larisa was either a daughter or mother of Pelasgus, the ancestor of the mythical Pelasgians. This name was later borne by a 4th-century Greek martyr who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Church. The name (of the city, nymph and saint) is commonly Latinized as Larissa, with a double s.
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch) LOW-ru(Portuguese) LOW-rə(Catalan) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 48% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the Little House on the Prairie series of novels.

LEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEH-a(German) LEH-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 47% based on 23 votes
Form of LEAH used in several languages.
LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 22 votes
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, who he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.

Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lee-AN-ə
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA [1].
LEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-ə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Form of LEAH used in the Greek Old Testament. This is the name of a princess in the Star Wars movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.
LELAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
LENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена(Russian) Λενα(Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-na(Swedish, German, Polish, Italian) LYEH-nə(Russian) LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LEROY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE-roi
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From the French nickname le roi meaning "the king". It has been common as an English given name since the 19th century.
LETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-TISH-ə
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From the Late Latin name Laetitia meaning "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Rating: 53% based on 11 votes
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LIDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian
Pronounced: LYEE-dya(Polish) LEE-dya(Italian) LEE-dhya(Spanish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Polish, Italian, Spanish and Romanian form of LYDIA.
LILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LEE-lya(Spanish) LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Spanish and Italian form of LILY, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see LILIYA).
LILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 46% based on 12 votes
Latinate form of LILLIAN.
LILIANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LEE-LYAN
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
French form of LILLIAN.
LILLI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Finnish
Pronounced: LI-lee(German) LEEL-lee(Finnish)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
German variant of LILI and a Finnish variant of LILJA.
LILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən
Rating: 73% based on 8 votes
Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINNAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NAY-ə, li-NEE-ə
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see LINNÉA).
LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NEH-a
Rating: 66% based on 10 votes
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.
LINWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-wuwd
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LLOYD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOID
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From a surname that was derived from Welsh llwyd meaning "grey". The composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-) is a famous bearer of this name.
LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 9 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
MAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: MA-EHL(French)
Rating: 55% based on 31 votes
Feminine form of MAËL.
MALIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAH-lin
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Swedish and Norwegian short form of MAGDALENE.
MARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָרָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAHR-ə(English) MAR-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).
MARA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Мара(Serbian)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Hungarian variant of MÁRIA, and a Croatian and Serbian variant of MARIJA.
MARAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani, Armenian
Other Scripts: Մարալ(Armenian)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "deer" in Azerbaijani and Armenian, referring to the Caspian Red Deer, derived from Persian مرال (maral).
MARCOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: MAR-kos(Spanish) MAR-koosh(European Portuguese) MAKH-koos(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcus (see MARK).
MAREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAH-rehn(Danish)
Rating: 56% based on 14 votes
Danish form of MARINA.
MARIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Georgian, Italian
Other Scripts: Μαρικα(Greek) მარიკა(Georgian)
Pronounced: MA-ri-ka(Czech) ma-RYEE-ka(Polish) MAW-ree-kaw(Hungarian) MAH-ree-kah(Finnish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with Mari.
MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.
MARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Pronounced: ma-REE-za(Italian) ma-REE-sa(Spanish) mə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Dutch, Finnish
Pronounced: ma-REE-ta(German, Spanish) MAH-ree-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of MARIA.
MARSAILI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MAR-si-li
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA.
MARTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин, Мартын(Russian) Мартин(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin(English) MAR-TEHN(French) MAR-teen(German, Slovak) MAT-tin(Swedish) MAHT-tin(Norwegian) MAH-teen(Danish) MAR-kyin(Czech) MAWR-teen(Hungarian) mar-TIN(Bulgarian) MAHR-teen(Finnish)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MERRITT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-it
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.
MIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: MEE-ah(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch) MEE-a(German) MEE-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MIDORI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-DO-REE
Rating: 51% based on 32 votes
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that have the same pronunciation.
MILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Мила(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Міла(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: MI-la(Czech)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: MEEL-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Short form of CAMILLA and other names that end in milla.
MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem Mirèio (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIRELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Albanian
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Romanian, Croatian and Albanian form of MIREILLE.
MIRIAM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) mee-RYAM(Spanish) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
MIROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Мирослав(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MI-ro-slaf(Czech) MEE-raw-slow(Slovak) myi-ru-SLAF(Russian)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MIYU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 美優, 美結, 実優, 美夕, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-YOO
Rating: 52% based on 21 votes
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "evening". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MIZUKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 瑞希, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-ZOO-KYEE
Rating: 48% based on 22 votes
From Japanese (mizu) meaning "felicitous omen, auspicious" and (ki) meaning "hope", besides other kanji combinations.
MORGANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAWR-GAN
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
French, either a form of MORGAN (2) or a feminine form of MORGAN (1).
NAOKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 直子, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: NA-O-KO
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
From Japanese (nao) meaning "straight" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
NARELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. It was borne by the wife of Umbarra, who was a 19th-century leader of the Yuin, an Australian Aboriginal people.
NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλια(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 23 votes
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: NAT-ə-lee(English) NA-ta-lee(German)
Rating: 56% based on 31 votes
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATHALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: NA-TA-LEE(French) NA-ta-lee(German)
Rating: 46% based on 21 votes
French form of NATALIE, as well as a Dutch, German and Scandinavian variant.
NEMANJA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Немања(Serbian)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Possibly from Slavic ne maniti meaning "not deceiving, not luring, not attracting" [1]. Another theory states that it means "without possessions", derived from Serbo-Croatian nemati meaning "have not". This was the name of a 12th-century Serbian king, and the name of the dynasty he began.
NERISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.
NERO (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: NIR-o(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigorous". It was borne most infamously by a tyrannical Roman emperor of the 1st century.
NERO (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEH-ro
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Short form of RANIERO.
NEVENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Невена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".
NISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: נִסָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "sign" in Hebrew.
NORMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: NAWR-mən(English)
Rating: 49% based on 16 votes
From an old Germanic byname meaning "northman", referring to a Viking. The Normans were Vikings who settled on the coast of France, in the region that became known as Normandy. In England the name Norman or Normant was used before the Norman Conquest, first as a nickname for Scandinavian settlers and later as a given name. After the Conquest it became more common, but died out around the 14th century. It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to a character by this name in C. M. Yonge's novel The Daisy Chain (1856) [2].
OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 70% based on 34 votes
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

OLIVERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Оливера(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of OLIVER.
OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

OLIVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
Pronounced: O-LEE-VEE(French)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Оля(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of OLGA.
ORESTES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ορεστης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: O-REHS-TEHS(Classical Greek) aw-REHS-teez(English)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Derived from Greek ορεστιας (orestias) meaning "of the mountains". In Greek myth he was the son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. He killed his mother and her lover Aegisthus after they killed his father.
ORSINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Italian form of the Roman name Ursinus, itself derived from Ursus (see URS). This is the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
ORSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWR-sən
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From a Norman nickname derived from a diminutive of Norman French ors "bear", ultimately from Latin ursus. American actor and director Orson Welles (1915-1985) was a famous bearer of this name.
OSCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər(English) AWS-kar(Italian, Swedish) AWS-KAR(French)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson [1]. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

OVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: AHV-id(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Roman family name Ovidius, which was possibly derived from Latin ovis "a sheep". Alternatively, it could have a Sabellic origin. Publius Ovidius Naso, better known as Ovid, was a 1st-century BC Roman poet who often wrote on the subjects of love and mythology. He was sent into exile by Emperor Augustus for no apparent reason.
OVIDIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-BEE-dhyo(Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Italian and Spanish form of Ovidius (see OVID).
PAIGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYJ
Rating: 43% based on 30 votes
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
Pronounced: PAWL(English, French) POWL(German, Dutch)
Rating: 48% based on 23 votes
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PELAGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek, Polish
Other Scripts: Πελαγια(Greek)
Pronounced: peh-LA-gya(Polish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of PELAGIUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a young 4th-century martyr who threw herself from a rooftop in Antioch rather than lose her virginity.
PERPETUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: pehr-PEH-twa(Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PEH-tra(German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak) PEH-traw(Hungarian) PEHT-rah(Finnish) PEHT-rə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
POMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From Latin pomus "fruit tree". This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.
QUIRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of QUIRINUS.
RAHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Latin
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Biblical Latin form of RACHEL.
RAMIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ra-MEE-ro(Spanish) ra-MEE-roo(European Portuguese) ha-MEE-roo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and mari "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
REID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From a surname, a Scots variant of REED.
RIDLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RID-lee
Rating: 41% based on 22 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from various English place names meaning "reed clearing" or "channel clearing" in Old English.
RIN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: REEN
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
From Japanese (rin) meaning "dignified, severe, cold" or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RINALDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 38% based on 14 votes
Italian form of REYNOLD. This is the Italian name of the hero Renaud, a character in several Renaissance epics.
RODYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Родя(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of RODION.
ROGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: RAHJ-ər(English) RAWJ-ə(British English) RAW-ZHEH(French) roo-ZHEH(Catalan) RO-gu(German)
Rating: 43% based on 15 votes
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
RUSLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar, Circassian
Other Scripts: Руслан(Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar) Руслъан(Western Circassian, Eastern Circassian)
Pronounced: ruws-LAN(Russian)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Form of YERUSLAN used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem Ruslan and Ludmila (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
SAKURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 桜, 咲良, etc.(Japanese Kanji) さくら(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SA-KOO-RA
Rating: 57% based on 34 votes
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.
SANTIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: san-TYA-gho(Spanish) sun-tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) sun-chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 42% based on 14 votes
Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. This is the name of the capital city of Chile, as well as several other cities in the Spanish-speaking world.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SCOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT(American English) SKAWT(British English)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SHIRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: شیرین(Persian)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Means "sweet" in Persian. This was the name of a character in Persian and Turkish legend.
SHIZUKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 静夏, 静香, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SHEE-ZOO-KA
Rating: 49% based on 21 votes
From Japanese (shizu) meaning "quiet" combined with (ka) meaning "summer" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SIDNEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).
SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHN-ə
Rating: 37% based on 22 votes
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
SIERRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHR-ə
Rating: 34% based on 18 votes
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σιλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
SUNNIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
TAKARA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TA-KA-RA
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (takara) meaning "treasure, jewel", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
TAKUMA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 拓真, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TA-KOO-MA
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
From Japanese (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" and (ma) meaning "real, genuine". Other kanji combinations are possible.
TARQUIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: TAHR-kwin(English)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From Tarquinius, a Roman name of unknown meaning, possibly Etruscan in origin. This was the name of two early kings of Rome.
TIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 39% based on 31 votes
Portuguese form of JAMES, derived from SANTIAGO.
TIBERIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: tee-BEH-ree-oos(Classical Latin) tie-BEHR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "of the Tiber" in Latin. The Tiber is the river that runs through Rome. Tiberius was the second Roman emperor, the stepson of Emperor Augustus.
TIHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Тихана(Serbian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element tikhu "quiet".
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TITANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tie-TAY-nee-ə(American English) ti-TAH-nee-ə(British English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) where it is the name of the queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
TOMÁŠ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: TO-mash(Czech) TAW-mash(Slovak)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Czech and Slovak form of THOMAS.
TREVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: TREHV-ər(English)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "big village" from Welsh tref "village" and mawr "large".
VANESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: və-NEHS-ə(English) va-NEH-sa(German)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem Cadenus and Vanessa (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-yo-la(Czech)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
VLADIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владимир(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: vlu-DYEE-myir(Russian) VLA-dee-meer(Serbian, Croatian)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
WAKANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 和奏, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: WA-KA-NA
Rating: 37% based on 31 votes
From Japanese (wa) meaning "harmony" and (kana) meaning "play music, complete", as well as other combinations of kanji that are pronounced the same way.
WARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWRD
Rating: 36% based on 15 votes
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WAYNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAYN
Rating: 32% based on 13 votes
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WYNN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: WIN
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Variant of WYN.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
YUINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 結菜, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-EE-NA
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (yui) meaning "tie, bind" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Юрий(Russian) Юрій(Ukrainian) Юрый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee(Russian)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Юрий, Ukrainian Юрій or Belarusian Юрый (see YURIY).
YURI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-REE
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From Japanese 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
ZILLAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צִלָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIL-ə(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Means "shade" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the second wife of Lamech.
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
ZURI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful" in Swahili.
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