Kinola's Personal Name List

ABRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brə-ham(English) a-bra-AM(Spanish) A-BRA-AM(French) A-bra-hahm(Dutch) A-bra-ham(German) AH-bra-ham(Swedish)
Rating: 52% based on 29 votes
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) meaning "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the American president Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), who pushed to abolish slavery and led the country through the Civil War.

ABRAM (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: אַבְרָם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brəm(English)
Rating: 56% based on 37 votes
Means "high father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament God changed Abram's name to Abraham (see Genesis 17:5).
ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AW-daw(Hungarian) AH-dah(Finnish)
Rating: 56% based on 38 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADORACIÓN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-dho-ra-THYON(European Spanish) a-dho-ra-SYON(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 23% based on 26 votes
Means "adoration" in Spanish. This name refers to the event that is known in Christian tradition as the Adoration of the Magi, which is when the three Magi presented gifts to the infant Jesus and worshipped him.
AGAPITO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: a-gha-PEE-to(Spanish) a-ga-PEE-to(Italian)
Rating: 22% based on 33 votes
From the Late Latin name Agapitus or Agapetus, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀγαπητός (Agapetos) meaning "beloved". The name Agapetus was borne by two popes.
ALBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: Альберт(Russian)
Pronounced: AL-bərt(English) AL-BEHR(French) əl-BEHRT(Catalan) AL-behrt(German, Polish) ul-BYEHRT(Russian) AHL-bərt(Dutch) AL-bat(Swedish) AWL-behrt(Hungarian)
Rating: 52% based on 36 votes
From the Germanic name Adalbert meaning "noble and bright", composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.

This name was borne by two 20th-century kings of Belgium. Other famous bearers include the German physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), creator of the theory of relativity, and Albert Camus (1913-1960), a French-Algerian writer and philosopher.

ALEXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE-A(French) ə-LEHK-see-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 38 votes
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-frəd(English) AL-FREHD(French) AL-freht(German, Polish) AHL-frət(Dutch)
Rating: 49% based on 34 votes
Means "elf counsel", derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.

Famous bearers include the British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892), the Swedish inventor and Nobel Prize founder Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), and the British-American film director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980).

ALONDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-LON-dra
Rating: 48% based on 20 votes
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
ALONZO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 35% based on 20 votes
Italian variant of ALFONSO.
AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
Rating: 43% based on 34 votes
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
Rating: 44% based on 34 votes
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANATOLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-NA-TAWL
Rating: 32% based on 32 votes
French form of ANATOLIUS.
ANITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Pronounced: a-NEE-ta(Spanish, German) ə-NEET-ə(English) ah-NEE-tah(Dutch) AH-nee-tah(Finnish) a-NYEE-ta(Polish)
Rating: 41% based on 32 votes
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANTONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-tə-nee
Rating: 42% based on 27 votes
Variant of ANTHONY. This was formerly the usual English spelling of the name, but during the 17th century the h began to be added.
APOLLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀπόλλων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-PAHL-o(English)
Rating: 48% based on 35 votes
From Greek Ἀπόλλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo meaning "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb ἀπόλλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
ARACELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 49% based on 34 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARTHUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
Rating: 53% based on 34 votes
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius [1]). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth [2]. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

BASIL (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAZ-əl
Rating: 55% based on 34 votes
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 68% based on 36 votes
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bə-LIN-də
Rating: 47% based on 20 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related to Italian bella "beautiful". The second element could be Germanic lind meaning "flexible, soft, tender" (and by extension "snake, serpent"). This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem The Rape of the Lock (1712).
BENEDICT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-ə-dikt
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the Late Latin name Benedictus, which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
BETONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BEHT-nee, BEHT-ə-nee
Rating: 23% based on 9 votes
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BEVERLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHV-ər-lee
Rating: 41% based on 33 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark [1].
CADEYRN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Welsh
Rating: 25% based on 31 votes
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CÁEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 30% based on 30 votes
From Irish caol meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
Rating: 54% based on 23 votes
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CARLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kahr-LEEN
Rating: 28% based on 24 votes
Feminine diminutive of CARL.
CARLOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: kar-LOT-ta
Rating: 54% based on 27 votes
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ən, KEHR-ən
Rating: 34% based on 25 votes
Variant of KAREN (1).
CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 63% based on 25 votes
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CHARITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHR-ə-tee, CHAR-ə-tee
Rating: 46% based on 22 votes
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHRISTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KREES-TEEN(French) kris-TEEN(English) kris-TEE-nə(German, Dutch)
Rating: 48% based on 21 votes
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 79% based on 34 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLINTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIN-tən
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
CLOELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 41% based on 27 votes
Feminine form of CLOELIUS. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.
CODY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KO-dee
Rating: 43% based on 28 votes
From the Irish surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COLIN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, English
Pronounced: KAHL-in(Scottish, Irish, English) KOL-in(English)
Rating: 49% based on 33 votes
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COOPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOO-pər
Rating: 30% based on 33 votes
From a surname meaning "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
CORNELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kawr-NEH-lya(German) kor-NEH-lya(Italian) kawr-NEH-lee-a(Dutch) kawr-NEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 27 votes
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORNELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Pronounced: kawr-NEE-lee-əs(English) kawr-NEH-lee-uys(Dutch) kawr-NEH-lyuws(German)
Personal note: A grand-uncle's name
Rating: 53% based on 31 votes
Roman family name that possibly derives from the Latin element cornu meaning "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
COSMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 39% based on 30 votes
Italian variant of COSIMO. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
DARCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
Personal note: A 3rd-grade classmate had this name.
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DIR-drə(English) DIR-dree(English) DYEHR-dryə(Irish)
Rating: 42% based on 33 votes
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from Old Irish der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' Deirdre (1907) and J. M. Synge's Deirdre of the Sorrows (1910).

DENISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: DU-NEEZ(French) də-NEES(English) də-NEE-sə(Dutch)
Rating: 30% based on 27 votes
French feminine form of DENIS.
DERRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Diminutive of DERMOT.
DIAMOND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DIE-mənd
Rating: 31% based on 31 votes
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DOMITILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: do-mee-TEEL-la(Italian)
Rating: 37% based on 27 votes
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DONNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə
Rating: 29% based on 14 votes
From Italian donna meaning "lady". It is also used as a feminine form of DONALD.
DOROTHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Rating: 61% based on 31 votes
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and several of its sequels.
DWAYNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DWAYN
Rating: 30% based on 29 votes
Variant of DUANE.
EINION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 20% based on 26 votes
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
ELLEN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ən
Rating: 53% based on 31 votes
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 19th century, when the form Helen also became common.
ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Rating: 68% based on 27 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EMERALD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-ə-rəld
Rating: 53% based on 30 votes
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμάραγδος (smaragdos).
EMMALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 67% based on 33 votes
Variant of EMMELINE.
ENID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: EH-nid(Welsh)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
ENOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-NO-lə
Rating: 34% based on 27 votes
Meaning unknown. This name first appeared in the late 19th century. It is the name of the main character in the novel Enola; or, her Fatal Mistake (1886) by Mary Young Ridenbaugh. The aircraft that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima was named Enola Gay after the mother of the pilot, who was herself named for the book character.
ENYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EHN-yə
Personal note: Yes, I liked it because of the singer.
Rating: 48% based on 29 votes
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ERNEST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Polish
Pronounced: UR-nist(English) EHR-NEST(French) ər-NEST(Catalan) EHR-nest(Polish)
Rating: 34% based on 18 votes
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy The Importance of Being Earnest (1895).
ETHELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 42% based on 21 votes
English form of the Germanic name ADALLINDIS. The name was very rare in medieval times, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
ÉTIENNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 42% based on 23 votes
French feminine form of STEPHEN.
EULALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Εὐλαλία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-LA-lya(Spanish) yoo-LAY-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 27 votes
Derived from Greek εὔλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and λαλέω (laleo) meaning "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EZEKIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl(English)
Rating: 47% based on 31 votes
From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God will strengthen", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strengthen" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
FAITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAYTH
Rating: 49% based on 23 votes
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
FRANKLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRANGK-lin
Rating: 45% based on 28 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English frankelin "freeman". A famous bearer of the surname was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher. The name has commonly been given in his honour in the United States. It also received a boost during the term of American president Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
FREDERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREHD-ə-rik, FREHD-rik
Personal note: A cousin's name.
Rating: 62% based on 34 votes
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

GAL (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּל(Hebrew)
Rating: 21% based on 27 votes
Means "wave" in Hebrew.
GEORGIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Γεώργιος(Greek)
Pronounced: yeh-AWR-yee-aws(Greek) GEH-AWR-GEE-OS(Classical Greek)
Rating: 33% based on 27 votes
Greek form of GEORGE.
GLORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, German
Pronounced: GLAWR-ee-ə(English) GLO-rya(Spanish) GLAW-rya(Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 25 votes
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.

The name was introduced to the English-speaking world by E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel Gloria (1891) and George Bernard Shaw's play You Never Can Tell (1898), which both feature characters with a Portuguese background [1]. It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

GORDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GAWR-dən(English)
Rating: 30% based on 26 votes
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name in Berwickshire meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GREGORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG-ə-ree
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγόριος (Gregorios), derived from γρήγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It has been used in England since the 12th century. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

GUDRUN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: GOO-droon(German)
Rating: 20% based on 21 votes
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
HANK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HANGK
Rating: 31% based on 28 votes
Originally a short form of Hankin, which was a medieval diminutive of JOHN. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of HENRY, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive HENK. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-).
HAROLD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-əld, HEHR-əld
Rating: 42% based on 26 votes
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman Conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HECTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Other Scripts: Ἕκτωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-tər(English) EHK-TAWR(French)
Rating: 41% based on 26 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἕκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ἕκτωρ (hektor) meaning "holding fast", ultimately from ἔχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends where it belongs to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It has been historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

HENRIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish
Pronounced: hehn-ree-EHT-ə(English) HEHN-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian) HEHN-ree-eht-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 32 votes
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
HERBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Czech, Swedish, French
Pronounced: HUR-bərt(English) HEHR-behrt(German) HAR-bat(Swedish) EHR-BEHR(French)
Rating: 34% based on 18 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HORACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: HAWR-əs(English) AW-RAS(French)
Rating: 28% based on 26 votes
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
HUBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HYOO-bərt(English) HOO-behrt(German) HUY-bərt(Dutch) UY-BEHR(French) KHOO-behrt(Polish)
Rating: 23% based on 18 votes
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century [2].
HUGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-goo(Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Rating: 59% based on 23 votes
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
IDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: IE-də(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Dutch, Italian, Polish) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish) EE-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 48% based on 31 votes
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
Rating: 44% based on 18 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: ie-O-nə(English)
Rating: 63% based on 32 votes
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
ISHMAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשְׁמָעֵאל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ISH-may-əl(English)
Rating: 35% based on 26 votes
From the Hebrew name יִשְׁמָעֵאל (Yishma'el) meaning "God will hear", from the roots שָׁמַע (shama') meaning "to hear" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Abraham. He is the traditional ancestor of the Arab people. Also in the Old Testament, it is borne by a man who assassinates Gedaliah the governor of Judah. The author Herman Melville later used this name for the narrator in his novel Moby-Dick (1851).
ISMENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰσμήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EEZ-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) is-MEE-nee(English)
Personal note: Heard this name in a Humanities class and fell in love with it.
Rating: 48% based on 27 votes
Possibly from Greek ἰσμή (isme) meaning "knowledge". This was the name of the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta in Greek legend.
IVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Other Scripts: Иван(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Іван(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: i-VAN(Russian) ee-WAHN(Ukrainian) EE-van(Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene) I-van(Czech) IE-vən(English) ee-VAN(Romanian)
Rating: 45% based on 31 votes
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
JACOB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Rating: 69% based on 22 votes
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

JADE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD(English) ZHAD(French)
Rating: 57% based on 29 votes
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JANINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHA-NEEN(French) jə-NEEN(English) ya-NEE-nə(German)
Personal note: I think this has a unique pronunciation.
Rating: 28% based on 28 votes
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.
JENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Finnish
Pronounced: JEHN-ə(English) YEHN-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 28 votes
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series Dallas [1].
JEREMIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִרְמְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jehr-i-MIE-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 27 votes
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.

In England, though the vernacular form Jeremy had been occasionally used since the 13th century, the form Jeremiah was not common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON
Personal note: My mom's name
Rating: 43% based on 32 votes
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century. It again became quite popular in the first half of the 20th century, entering the top ten names for both the United States and the United Kingdom, though it has since faded.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

Other notable bearers include the actress Joan Crawford (1904-1977) and the comedian Joan Rivers (1933-2014), both Americans.

JOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 46% based on 28 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf(English) ZHO-ZEHF(French) YO-zehf(German)
Rating: 41% based on 18 votes
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ἰωσήφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. In the United States it has stayed within the top 25 names for boys since 1880, making it one of the most enduringly popular names of this era.

This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include the founder of Mormonism Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JOSHUA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHSH-oo-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 29 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

JOY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOI
Rating: 37% based on 28 votes
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JUDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-dith(English) YOO-dit(German) khoo-DHEET(Spanish) ZHUY-DEET(French)
Rating: 43% based on 22 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.

As an English name it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, despite a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages. It was however used earlier on the European continent, being borne by several European royals, such as the 9th-century Judith of Bavaria.

KALANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: ka-LA-nee
Rating: 50% based on 27 votes
Means "the heavens" from Hawaiian ka "the" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
KATRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: kə-TREE-nə(English) kaht-REE-nah(Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 31 votes
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KEELEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Personal note: Favorite spelling: Keeli
Rating: 35% based on 31 votes
Variant of KEELY.
LANCELOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: LAN-sə-laht(English)
Rating: 24% based on 28 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly an Old French diminutive of Lanzo (see LANCE). In Arthurian legend Lancelot was the bravest of the Knights of the Round Table. He became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere, ultimately causing the destruction of Arthur's kingdom. His earliest appearance is in the works of the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes.
LARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Latvian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Лариса(Russian, Ukrainian) Λάρισα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lu-RYEE-sə(Russian)
Personal note: I first heard this name in a fan fiction.
Rating: 52% based on 26 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient city of Larisa in Thessaly, which meant "citadel". In Greek legends, the nymph Larisa was either a daughter or mother of Pelasgus, the ancestor of the mythical Pelasgians. This name was later borne by a 4th-century Greek martyr who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Church. The name (of the city, nymph and saint) is commonly Latinized as Larissa, with a double s. As a Ukrainian name, it is more commonly transcribed Larysa.
LAVANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Tamil
Other Scripts: लावण्या(Hindi) లావణ్యా(Telugu) லாவண்யா(Tamil)
Rating: 41% based on 26 votes
Means "beauty, grace" in Sanskrit.
LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
Rating: 57% based on 27 votes
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 26 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LAZARUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Λάζαρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAZ-ə-rəs(English)
Personal note: My favorite Biblical name.
Rating: 37% based on 29 votes
Latinized form of Λάζαρος (Lazaros), a Greek form of ELEAZAR used in the New Testament. Lazarus was a man from Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha, who was restored to life by Jesus.
LEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Λήδα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-DA(Classical Greek) LEE-də(English) LAY-də(English)
Rating: 47% based on 23 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
LEOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 35% based on 26 votes
Feminine form of LEO.
LEONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(Czech)
Rating: 66% based on 30 votes
Feminine form of LEON.
LEONARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: LEHN-ərd(English) LAY-o-nahrt(Dutch) LEH-o-nart(German) leh-AW-nart(Polish)
Rating: 46% based on 28 votes
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
LEROY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE-roi
Rating: 26% based on 28 votes
From the French nickname le roi meaning "the king". It has been common as an English given name since the 19th century.
LEWIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-is
Rating: 60% based on 29 votes
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the Chronicles of Narnia.
LISBETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEES-beht
Rating: 57% based on 29 votes
German short form of ELISABETH.
LORI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ee
Rating: 29% based on 26 votes
Diminutive of LAURA or LORRAINE.
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Rating: 60% based on 26 votes
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LUDWIG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LOOT-vikh
Rating: 28% based on 23 votes
From the Germanic name Chlodovech meaning "famous battle", composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LUELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: loo-EHL-ə
Rating: 34% based on 27 votes
Variant of LOUELLA.
LYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN
Rating: 40% based on 31 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Welsh llyn meaning "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls. In some cases it may be thought of as a short form of LINDA or names that end in lyn or line.
MACARIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-KA-ryo
Rating: 31% based on 26 votes
Spanish form of the Latin name Macarius, derived from the Greek name Μακάριος (Makarios), which was in turn derived from Greek μάκαρ (makar) meaning "blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints.
MARCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: MAHR-shə(English) mahr-SEE-ə(English) MAR-thya(European Spanish) MAR-sya(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 27 votes
Feminine form of MARCIUS. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century [1].
MARIGOLD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
Rating: 55% based on 24 votes
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MARITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Dutch, Finnish
Pronounced: ma-REE-ta(German, Spanish) MAH-ree-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 15 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.
MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) MAH-teel-dah(Finnish) MA-teel-da(Slovak)
Rating: 71% based on 31 votes
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was very popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song Waltzing Matilda, written in 1895.

MAUREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: maw-REEN(English)
Personal note: A cousin and an aunt's name.
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Anglicized form of MÁIRÍN.
MELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian
Pronounced: mə-LIN-də(English) MEH-leen-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 59% based on 20 votes
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda [1]. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play Bánk Bán by József Katona.
MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 60% based on 29 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play Pelléas et Mélisande (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Μιχαήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-kəl(English) MI-kha-ehl(German, Czech) MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish) MEE-kah-ehl(Norwegian) MEE-kal(Danish) mee-KA-ehl(Latin)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel).

In the United States, this name rapidly gained popularity beginning in the 1930s, eventually becoming the most popular male name from 1954 to 1998. However, it was not as overwhelmingly common in the United Kingdom, where it never reached the top spot.

Famous bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
Rating: 60% based on 24 votes
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem Mirèio (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIRICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 45% based on 23 votes
Diminutive of MIRELA or names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace, world".
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 47% based on 32 votes
Medieval diminutive of MARY, now often used independently. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1922), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MUIRNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 26% based on 23 votes
Means "festive" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of the mother of Fionn mac Cumhail.
NAILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نائلة(Arabic)
Pronounced: NA-ee-lah
Rating: 34% based on 28 votes
Feminine form of NAIL. This was the name of the wife of Uthman, the third caliph of the Muslims. She tried in vain to prevent a mob from murdering her husband, and had several fingers cut off in the process.
NANCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAN-see
Rating: 36% based on 23 votes
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: NEH-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Short form of LINNÉA.
NELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish
Pronounced: NEHL-ee(English) NEH-li(Swedish)
Rating: 36% based on 29 votes
Diminutive of NELL.
NESSA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NEHS-a(Irish)
Rating: 42% based on 28 votes
Anglicized form of NEASA.
NIALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: NYEE-əl(Irish)
Rating: 39% based on 27 votes
Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL.
NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay(English)
Rating: 32% based on 29 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French Lancelot-Grail cycle.
OBADIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֹבַדְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: o-bə-DIE-ə(English)
Rating: 31% based on 18 votes
Means "serving YAHWEH" in Hebrew, derived from עָבַד ('avad) meaning "to serve" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets, the author of the Book of Obadiah, which predicts the downfall of the nation of Edom.
OLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: AW-la
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Polish short form of ALEKSANDRA.
OLIVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: AW-LEE-VYEH(French) O-lee-veer(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 26 votes
French and Dutch form of OLIVER. This is also the French word meaning "olive tree".
ONOFRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: o-NO-freh(Spanish)
Rating: 16% based on 8 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of ONUPHRIUS.
OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
Rating: 43% based on 27 votes
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
ORFEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: or-FEH-o
Rating: 24% based on 26 votes
Italian and Spanish form of ORPHEUS.
ORLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OR-la
Rating: 51% based on 27 votes
Anglicized form of ÓRFHLAITH.
ÓRLAITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OR-la
Rating: 30% based on 25 votes
Variant of ÓRFHLAITH.
PAAIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Manx
Rating: 18% based on 27 votes
Manx form of PEGGY.
PATRICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Pronounced: pə-TRISH-ə(English) pa-TREE-thya(European Spanish) pa-TREE-sya(Latin American Spanish) pa-TREE-tsya(German)
Personal note: Paternal grandmother's name
Rating: 48% based on 22 votes
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland [1].
PAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Biblical
Pronounced: PAWL(English, French) POWL(German, Dutch)
Rating: 57% based on 19 votes
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Rating: 47% based on 28 votes
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEIGI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 20% based on 28 votes
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl(English)
Rating: 38% based on 26 votes
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the Story of the Grail. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
PETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər(English) PEH-tu(German) PEH-tər(Dutch, Danish, Slovene) PEH-tehr(Slovak)
Rating: 65% based on 19 votes
Derived from Greek Πέτρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century [1].

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PHILLIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIL-ip
Rating: 53% based on 30 votes
Variant of PHILIP, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
PHYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Φυλλίς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FIL-is(English)
Rating: 37% based on 22 votes
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
POLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHL-ee
Rating: 40% based on 29 votes
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
RAYMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: RAY-mənd(English) REH-MAWN(French)
Rating: 52% based on 25 votes
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
RHODA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: Ῥόδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RO-də(English)
Rating: 30% based on 26 votes
Derived from Greek ῥόδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
RHONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 28% based on 26 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.
RIGANTONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology (Hypothetical)
Rating: 32% based on 28 votes
Reconstructed old Celtic form of RHIANNON.
RIGEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 27% based on 26 votes
Derived from Arabic الرجل (al-Rijl) meaning "foot". This is the name of the star that forms the left foot of the constellation Orion.
ROSEMARIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree(English) ROZ-mehr-ee(English) RO-zə-ma-ree(German)
Rating: 67% based on 21 votes
Variant of ROSEMARY.
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Rating: 64% based on 34 votes
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEE-na
Rating: 54% based on 26 votes
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1). This is the name of a character in Rossini's opera The Barber of Seville (1816).
ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ῥωξάνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 22 votes
Latin form of Ῥωξάνη (Rhoxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Rating: 63% based on 31 votes
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
SALLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAL-ee
Rating: 33% based on 26 votes
Diminutive of SARAH, often used independently.
SALOME
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: სალომე(Georgian) Σαλώμη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-LO-mee(English)
Rating: 40% based on 28 votes
From an Aramaic name that was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.

As a Christian given name, Salome has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation. This was due to a second person of this name in the New Testament: one of the women who witnessed the crucifixion and later discovered that Jesus' tomb was empty. It is used in Georgia due to the 4th-century Salome of Ujarma, who is considered a saint in the Georgian Church.

SAMUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: שְׁמוּאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAM-yoo-əl(English) SAM-yəl(English) SA-MWEHL(French) ZA-mwehl(German) sa-MWEHL(Spanish) san-MOO-ehl(Polish) SA-moo-ehl(Czech, Slovak, Swedish) SAH-moo-ehl(Finnish)
Rating: 47% based on 19 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el), which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.

As a Christian name, Samuel came into common use after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include American inventor Samuel Morse (1791-1872), Irish writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), and American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain.

SANDRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAHN-DREEN
Rating: 51% based on 21 votes
French diminutive of SANDRA.
SAPPHIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-ie-ər
Rating: 46% based on 29 votes
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, German, French, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish, English, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, Bosnian, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σάρα(Greek) Сара(Serbian, Macedonian) שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic) سارا(Persian)
Pronounced: SA-ra(Spanish, Italian, Danish, Icelandic, Polish) SAH-rah(Finnish, Dutch) ZA-ra(German) SA-RA(French) SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-rah(Arabic)
Rating: 48% based on 28 votes
Form of SARAH used in various languages.
SAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: שָׁאוּל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAWL(English)
Personal note: Will use it as the name of the protagonist in an future story.
Rating: 34% based on 27 votes
From the Hebrew name שָׁאוּל (Sha'ul) meaning "asked for, prayed for". This was the name of the first king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. Before the end of his reign he lost favour with God, and after a defeat by the Philistines he was succeeded by David as king. In the New Testament, Saul was the original Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Rating: 53% based on 31 votes
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SHIRLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHUR-lee
Rating: 33% based on 30 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of a main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel Shirley (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SOLANGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LAHNZH
Rating: 36% based on 29 votes
French form of the Late Latin name Sollemnia, which was derived from Latin sollemnis "religious". This was the name of a French shepherdess who became a saint after she was killed by her master.
SOLLEMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 37% based on 27 votes
Latin form of SOLANGE.
SOLOMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה(Hebrew) Σολομών(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən(American English) SAWL-ə-mən(British English)
Personal note: Like it, but may not use it.
Rating: 42% based on 29 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.

This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish. It was however borne by an 11th-century Hungarian king.

SOPHRONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Σωφρονία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 25 votes
Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.
SYLVESTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Danish
Pronounced: sil-VEHS-tər(English) zil-VEHS-tu(German)
Rating: 36% based on 27 votes
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. A famous bearer is the American actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-).
TALISHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-LEESH-ə(English) tə-LISH-ə(English)
Rating: 31% based on 26 votes
Combination of the popular name prefix Ta and LISHA.
TARAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Тарас(Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: tu-RAS(Russian)
Rating: 32% based on 25 votes
Ukrainian and Russian form of the Greek name Ταράσιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
THADDEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Θαδδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs(English) tha-DEE-əs(English)
Rating: 37% based on 20 votes
From Θαδδαῖος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεόδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
THEODORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Personal note: A must-use on a boy.
Rating: 59% based on 35 votes
From the Greek name Θεόδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THERESE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: teh-REH-zə(German) teh-REHS(Swedish) tə-REES(English)
Rating: 57% based on 23 votes
German and Scandinavian variant of THERESA.
THOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: THAWR(English) TOOR(Norwegian, Swedish) TOR(Danish)
Rating: 34% based on 27 votes
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
TIELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval German
Rating: 32% based on 24 votes
Earlier form of TILO.
TIFFANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIF-ə-nee
Rating: 49% based on 28 votes
Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.
TIMOTHY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: TIM-ə-thee(English)
Rating: 57% based on 26 votes
English form of the Greek name Τιμόθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour" and θεός (theos) meaning "god". Saint Timothy was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys and was the recipient of two of Paul's epistles that appear in the New Testament. He was of both Jewish and Greek ancestry. According to tradition, he was martyred at Ephesus after protesting the worship of Artemis. As an English name, Timothy was not used until after the Protestant Reformation.
TINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Тина(Macedonian) თინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: TEE-nə(English) TEE-na(Italian, Dutch)
Rating: 26% based on 26 votes
Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA, in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA, and in Georgian as a short form of TINATIN.
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 23 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TOIRÉASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 34% based on 15 votes
Irish form of THERESA.
TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
Rating: 39% based on 27 votes
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τόπαζος (topazos).
TRAVIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAV-is
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
TRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIS-tə
Rating: 55% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of TRISTAN.
UDANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 18% based on 24 votes
Derived from Basque uda meaning "summer".
UKKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: OOK-ko(Finnish)
Rating: 20% based on 26 votes
Means "old man" in Finnish. In Finnish mythology Ukko is the god of the sky and thunder.
URSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: UR-sə-lə(English) UR-syoo-lə(English) UWR-zoo-la(German) OOR-soo-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 42% based on 27 votes
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VASILISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василиса(Russian)
Pronounced: və-syi-LYEE-sə
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Russian feminine form of BASIL (1).
VEDRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Ведран(Serbian)
Rating: 29% based on 24 votes
Means "clear, cheerful" in Croatian and Serbian.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Rating: 55% based on 25 votes
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VESPASIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: vehs-PAY-zhee-ən(English) vehs-PAY-zhən(English)
Rating: 39% based on 22 votes
From the Roman cognomen Vespasianus, derived either from Latin vesper meaning "west" or "evening" or vespa meaning "wasp". This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.
VICTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Pronounced: VIK-tər(English) VEEK-TAWR(French)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
VIRGIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: VUR-jil(English)
Rating: 40% based on 25 votes
From the Roman family name Vergilius, which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the Aeneid. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
WALLACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: WAWL-əs(English)
Rating: 30% based on 24 votes
From a Scottish and English surname that originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as a given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, a Scottish hero who led the fight against English invasion in the 13th century.
WALTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: WAWL-tər(English) VAL-tu(German) VAL-tehr(Swedish, Italian)
Rating: 33% based on 18 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
WARREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWR-ən
Rating: 41% based on 27 votes
From an English surname that was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS-lee, WEHZ-lee
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WILLARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-ərd
Rating: 29% based on 25 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLEM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: VI-ləm
Rating: 40% based on 26 votes
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.
WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-ə-frid(English)
Rating: 38% based on 17 votes
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
WINSLOW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WINZ-lo
Rating: 33% based on 26 votes
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
WINSTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIN-stən
Rating: 38% based on 27 votes
From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name WYNNSTAN. A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (1874-1965), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's 1949 novel 1984.
XAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər(English) ig-ZAY-vyər(English) GZA-VYEH(French) shu-vee-EHR(European Portuguese) sha-vee-EHR(Brazilian Portuguese) shə-bee-EH(Catalan)
Rating: 52% based on 18 votes
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was born in a village by this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
XENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξένια(Greek) Ξενία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξένος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.
XERXES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Other Scripts: Ξέρξης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZURK-seez(English)
Rating: 25% based on 26 votes
Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha, which meant "ruler over heroes". This was a 5th-century BC king of Persia, the son of Darius the Great. He attempted an invasion of Greece, which ended unsuccessfully at the battle of Salamis.
XIOMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: syo-MA-ra
Rating: 45% based on 25 votes
Possibly a Spanish form of GUIOMAR.
YANIV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: יָנִיב(Hebrew)
Rating: 29% based on 27 votes
Means "he will prosper" in Hebrew.
YVETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: EE-VEHT(French) ee-VEHT(English) i-VEHT(English)
Rating: 47% based on 24 votes
French feminine form of YVES.
ZACHARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree(English)
Personal note: A kid I had a crush on in kindergarten had this name.
Rating: 60% based on 30 votes
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).
ZALMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זלמן(Yiddish)
Rating: 20% based on 25 votes
Yiddish variant of SOLOMON.
ZANE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.
ZARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZAHR-ə
Rating: 57% based on 26 votes
English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.
ZECHARIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: זְכַרְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: zehk-ə-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 16 votes
From the Hebrew name זְכַרְיָה (Zekharyah) meaning "YAHWEH remembers", from זָכַר (zakhar) meaning "to remember" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of many characters in the Old Testament, including the prophet Zechariah, the author of the Book of Zechariah. The name also appears in the New Testament belonging to the father of John the Baptist, who was temporarily made dumb because of his disbelief. He is regarded as a saint by Christians. In some versions of the New Testament his name is spelled in the Greek form Zacharias or the English form Zachary. As an English given name, Zechariah has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation.
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Rating: 61% based on 30 votes
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
ZITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Latvian
Pronounced: DZEE-ta(Italian) TSEE-ta(German) ZI-ta(Czech) ZEE-ta(Slovak)
Rating: 43% based on 16 votes
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
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