AustraLiana's Personal Name List

Adrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан(Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən(English) a-dree-AN(Romanian) A-dryan(Polish) A-dree-an(German) u-dryi-AN(Russian)
Form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
Agostinu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Corsican, Sardinian
Corsican variant of Agustinu and Sardinian form of Agostino.
Aled
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: A-lehd
From the name of a Welsh river, of uncertain meaning.
Andreas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ανδρέας(Greek) Ἀνδρέας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-DREH-as(German, Swedish) ahn-DREH-ahs(Dutch)
Ancient Greek and Latin form of Andrew. It is also the form used in Modern Greek, German and Welsh.
Anton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Russian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, Croatian, Romanian, Estonian, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Антон(Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AN-ton(German) un-TON(Russian) AHN-tawn(Dutch) ahn-TON(Ukrainian) an-TON(Belarusian, Slovene) AHN-ton(Finnish) AN-tahn(English)
Form of Antonius (see Anthony) used in various languages.
Arlo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-lo
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
Austin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWS-tin
Medieval contracted form of Augustine 1. Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
Beau
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: BO(English)
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.

Beckett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BEHK-it
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
Blaine
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYN
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
Bowie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Popular Culture
Pronounced: BOW-ee
From the traditionally Scottish and Irish surname, derived from a nickname from the Gaelic buidhe "yellow, fair-haired". Possibly an Anglicized form of Ó Buadhaigh meaning "descendant of Buadhach".

Usage of the name is likely in reference to legendary English musician David Bowie, born David Robert Jones (b.1947). David Bowie took the name from American folk-hero and pioneer James 'Jim' Bowie (1796-1836) who died at the Battle of the Alamo, and after whom the bowie knife is named. Bowie is the name of many cities around the world as well.

A noted bearer is American lawyer and sports administrator, Bowie Kuhn (1926-2007), who served as the fifth Commissioner of Major League Baseball (1969-1984). Bowie is the default name of the protagonist in the Sega tactical role-playing video game Shining Force II video game, a game frequently cited as one of the best of its kind.

Cairo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-ro
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
Calvin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

In modern times, this name is borne by American fashion designer Calvin Klein (1942-), as well as one of the main characters from Bill Watterson's comic strip Calvin and Hobbes (published from 1985 to 1995).

Carter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-tər
From an English surname that meant "one who uses a cart". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Jimmy Carter (1924-).
Casper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KAHS-pər(Dutch) KAHS-pehr(Swedish) KAS-bu(Danish)
Dutch and Scandinavian form of Jasper. This is the name of a friendly ghost in an American series of cartoons and comic books (beginning 1945).
Christopher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər
From the Late Greek name Χριστόφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστός (Christos) combined with φέρω (phero) meaning "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. It became very popular in the second half of the 20th century, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1980s, and nearing it in the United States.

In Denmark this name was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), English architect Christopher Wren (1632-1723) and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh books.

Cormac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
Crispin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-pin
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus, which was derived from the name Crispus. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
Cuba
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: q-ba
Goddess who helped the child transition from cradle to bed.
Darryl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Variant of Darrell.
Dashiell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
David
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) də-BEET(Catalan) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

Denis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Денис(Russian)
Pronounced: DU-NEE(French) dyi-NYEES(Russian) DEHN-is(English) DEH-nis(German, Czech)
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of Dionysius. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.

This name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and it was imported by the Normans to England. It is now regularly spelled Dennis in the English-speaking world. A notable bearer was the French philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784).

Denver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHN-vər
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).
Django
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani, Popular Culture
Pronounced: JANG-go(English) Dee-jan-go(Romani, Popular Culture) de-Jang-o(Romani, Popular Culture)
Means "to awake" in Romani, the traditional language of the ethnic group commonly referred to as gypsies. It can also be interpreted as a Romani form of Jean.


Was used in a spagetti western starring the magnificent Franco Nero.

Dominic
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHM-i-nik
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
Emmett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-it
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Errol
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHR-əl
From a surname that was originally derived from a Scottish place name. It was popularized as a given name by the Australian actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959).
Ezra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
Fitzroy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FITS-roi
From an English surname meaning "son of the king" in Old French, originally given to illegitimate sons of monarchs.
Florian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-RYAHN(French) FLAW-ryan(Polish)
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of Florus. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
Forbes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
From a surname that was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "field" in Gaelic.
Gary
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ee, GEHR-ee
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
Gilbert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: GIL-bərt(English) ZHEEL-BEHR(French) KHIL-bərt(Dutch) GIL-behrt(German)
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century English saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
Glenn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GLEHN(English)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
Grayson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
Hercules
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: HEHR-koo-lehs(Latin) HUR-kyə-leez(English)
Latin form of Herakles.
Hobart
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HO-bart
Apparently derived from the given name Hubert. Also a transferred use of the surname Hobart.
Holden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HOL-dən
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951), Holden Caufield.
Howard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOW-ərd
From an English surname that can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name Hughard; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name Hávarðr; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
Iden
Usage: Norwegian
Iggy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IG-ee
Diminutive of Ignatius.
Jacob
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

Jamison
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYM-ə-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Jericho
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHR-i-ko
From the name of a city in Israel that is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".
Johannes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Pronounced: yo-HA-nəs(German) yo-HAH-nəs(Dutch) yo-HAN-əs(Danish) YO-hahn-nehs(Finnish)
Latin form of Greek Ioannes (see John). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
Jupiter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOO-pi-tər(English)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see Zeus) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
Justus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: YUWS-tuws(German) JUS-təs(English)
Latin name meaning "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
Kaiser
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
German form of the Roman title Caesar (see Caesar). It is not used as a given name in Germany itself.
Karsten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: KAR-stən(Low German) KAS-dən(Danish)
Low German form of Christian.
Keanu
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: keh-A-noo
Means "the cool breeze" from Hawaiian ke, a definite article, and anu "coolness". This name is now associated with Canadian actor Keanu Reeves (1964-).
Keith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: KEETH(English)
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
Kingsley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KINGZ-lee
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
Kip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIP
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
Klaus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
Pronounced: KLOWS(German, Finnish)
German short form of Nicholas.
Knox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAHKS
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Old English cnocc "round hill".
Kobe 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
From the name of the city in Japan. The parents of basketball player Kobe Bryant (1978-2020) chose this name after seeing Kobe beef (which is from the Japanese city) on a menu.
Leif
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LAYF
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
Linden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-dən
From a German surname that was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
Lleyton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: LAY-ton
Possibly a form or respelling of Leyton, itself a form of the name Layton.

A known bearer of the name is Australian tennis player Lleyton Hewitt.

Marcus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MAR-koos(Latin) MAHR-kəs(English) MAR-kuys(Swedish)
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from the name of the Roman god Mars. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
Mars
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: MARS(Latin) MAHRZ(English)
Possibly related to Latin mas meaning "male" (genitive maris). In Roman mythology Mars was the god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares. This is also the name of the fourth planet in the solar system.
Marshall
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-shəl
From a surname that originally denoted a person who was a marshal. The word marshal originally derives from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant".
Martin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин, Мартын(Russian) Мартин(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin(English) MAR-TEHN(French) MAR-teen(German, Slovak) MAT-tin(Swedish) MAHT-tin(Norwegian) MAH-tseen(Danish) MAR-kyin(Czech) MAWR-teen(Hungarian) mar-TIN(Bulgarian) MAHR-teen(Finnish)
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god Mars. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

Micah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə(English)
Contracted form of Micaiah. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. This is also the name of a separate person in the Book of Judges, the keeper of an idol. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
Miles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used as an Anglicized form of Maoilios.

Montrose
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mon-TROZ
Transferred use of the surname Montrose.

With that said, Montrose was first used as a personal name in the 18th century by the Graham clan, who hold the title of Duke of Montrose in the Scottish peerage. Some of the best-known bearers of Montrose as a given name include the American business magnate Condé Montrose Nast (1873-1942) and the American actress Montrose Hagins (1917-2012).

Neil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: NEEL(English)
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.

In the early Middle Ages the name was adopted by Viking raiders and settlers in Ireland in the form Njal. The Vikings transmitted it to England and Scotland, as well as bringing it back to Scandinavia. It was also in use among the Normans, who were of Scandinavian origin. A famous bearer of this name was American astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), the first person to walk on the moon.

Oswald
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Anglo-Saxon [1]
Pronounced: AHZ-wawld(English) AWS-valt(German)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
Otto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AW-to(German) AHT-o(English) OT-to(Finnish)
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
Paddy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Irish diminutive of Patrick.
Pilot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PIE-lət
Either from the surname Pilot, which is derived from Pilate, or directly from the vocabulary word pilot, which is derived from either Greek πηδον (pedon) "steering oar" or πλωτης (plotes) "sailor". This name is borne by Pilot Inspektor Lee (2003-), son of American actor Jason Lee.
Pluto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Πλούτων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PLOO-to(English)
Latinized form of Greek Πλούτων (Plouton), derived from πλοῦτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.
Prince
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PRINS
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
Ptolemy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Other Scripts: Πτολεμαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAHL-ə-mee(English)
From the Greek name Πτολεμαῖος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμήϊος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive, warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendants of Ptolemy I Soter, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.
Rafael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) ha-fa-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) RA-fa-ehl(German) RAW-faw-ehl(Hungarian)
Form of Raphael in various languages.
Rayyan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ريّان(Arabic)
Pronounced: rie-YAN
Means "watered, luxuriant" in Arabic. According to Islamic tradition this is the name of one of the gates of paradise.
Reef
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
From late 16th century (earlier as riff ) from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch rif, ref, from Old Norse rif, literally ‘rib’, used in the same sense.
Rhythm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: RI-dhəm
From the word referring to metrical movement, derived via Latin from Ancient Greek ῥυθμός (rhythmós) meaning "measured flow/movement, symmetry, arrangement, order, form."
Roman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAWN-man(Polish) RO-man(Czech, German) RAW-man(Slovak) RO-mən(English)
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
Roscoe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHS-ko
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, itself derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
Rudolf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Рудольф(Russian) Ռուդոլֆ(Armenian)
Pronounced: ROO-dawlf(German, Slovak) ROO-dolf(Czech, Hungarian) RUY-dawlf(Dutch)
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
Russell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RUS-əl
From a surname meaning "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.
Rusty
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RUS-tee
From a nickname that was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
Rye
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE
Transferred use of the English surname Rye.

It is occasionally used as a diminutive of names that contain the -rye sound/element, for example Zachariah and Rylie.

Saul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: שָׁאוּל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAWL(English)
From the Hebrew name שָׁאוּל (Sha'ul) meaning "asked for, prayed for". This was the name of the first king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. Before the end of his reign he lost favour with God, and after a defeat by the Philistines he was succeeded by David as king. In the New Testament, Saul was the original Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
Seth 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת(Ancient Hebrew) Σήθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH(English)
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Shane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAYN
Anglicized form of Seán. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
Siegfried
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: ZEEK-freet(German)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the Nibelungenlied. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. He is a parallel to the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera The Ring of the Nibelung (1876).
Silas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σίλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Probably a short form of Silvanus. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name Saul (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

Solomon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה(Hebrew) Σολομών(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən(American English) SAWL-ə-mən(British English)
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.

This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish. It was however borne by an 11th-century Hungarian king.

Sorell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SOR-el
Transferred use of the surname Sorell. A famous namesake is biologist Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, the brother of Aldous Huxley.
Stuart
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: STOO-ərt(English) STYOO-ərt(English)
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". As a given name, it arose in 19th-century Scotland in honour of the Stuart royal family, which produced several kings and queens of Scotland and Britain between the 14th and 18th centuries.
Tasman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: TAZ-mən(Australian English)
Transferred use of the surname Tasman. Used in honour of the 17th century Dutch explorer Abel Tasman, who claimed the island now known as Tasmania in 1642. Many places in Australia and New Zealand are named after him, most notably the Tasman Sea which lies between the two countries.

Tasman is a Dutch form of the German surname Tessmann, derived from both Slavic and German. Slavonic personal names such as Techmir, meaning “consolation”, become Tess in German. The -mann part of the name usually means “servant of”. So Tasman means “servant of Techmir”.

Tate
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAYT
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
Thaddeus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Θαδδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs(English) tha-DEE-əs(English)
From Θαδδαῖος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεόδωρος (see Theodore). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
Torquil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Anglicized form of Torcuil.
Tyrion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Variant of Tyrian.
Tyrone
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: tie-RON
From the name of a county in Northern Ireland, which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of Eoghan". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.
Van
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAN
Short form of names containing van, such as Vance or Ivan.
Vance
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VANS
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
Warrior
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WOR-ee-ə
A person engaged in battle or warfare, and by extension, anyone fighting for a particular cause. The word comes from Anglo-Norman warrier, from Old French guerreier, derived from Latin guerra, "war". Has been in occasional use as a personal name since the 19th century.
Wayne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAYN
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
Wolf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF(German) WUWLF(English)
Short form of Wolfgang, Wolfram and other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
Zane 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.
Zen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZEN
This name is derived from either the word that is the Japanese on'yomi/reading of the Chinese word chán (禅), which is derived from the Sanskrit word dhyāna, meaning 'absorption, meditative state' or, in the case of U.S. soccer/football defender Zen Luzniak, a shortened form of Zenon.

Zen is a school of Buddhism which originated in China during the 7th century, and spread to Vietnam, Korea, and Japan. It emphasises rigorous meditation practices, and favours direct personal understanding rather than knowledge of doctrine.

Zen meditation became known in the West at the end of the 19th century, and at this time it became used as an English name, albeit sporadically. Interest in the practice and philosophy of Zen grew during the 1950s and '60s, though the name's usage remained sporadic and it wasn't until the late 1990s and 2000s that this name began to be used more frequently.

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