Felie's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately derived from Greek ἀκή (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AW-daw(Hungarian) AH-dah(Finnish)
Rating: 81% based on 16 votes
Popularity: the United States: #209 (up 42)
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADELCHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Medieval Italian
Pronounced: a-DEL-kee(Italian)
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
It is an Italian form of ADELGIS from the Ancient German elements adal 'noble' and gisil 'arrow'. Adelchi was a Longobard prince, son of King Desiderio who ruled Longobard territories in years 756-774. In 774 Charlemagne conquered this reign. Adelchi is also the title of a tragedy written by author Alessandro Manzoni in 1822 with Prince Adelchi as main character.
ADRIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: a-dree-A-no(Italian)
Rating: 66% based on 15 votes
Italian and Portuguese form of ADRIAN.
ADSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: A-tso or A--dzo
Rating: 20% based on 9 votes
Form of AZZO. Adso da Melk is a fictional Medieval character in Umberto Eco masterpiece 'Il nome della rosa' (1980). That character is loosely based on a real person: the monk Adso de Montier-en-Der (910/915 – 992). In Italy this name is no longer used and known just for the character and as a Medieval name.
AGATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Агата(Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: a-GA-ta(Italian, Polish) a-GHA-ta(Spanish) u-GA-tə(Russian)
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
Form of AGATHA in various languages.
AGNESE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Latvian
Pronounced: an-NYEH-zeh(Italian) AHG-neh-seh(Latvian)
Rating: 59% based on 13 votes
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Bosnian, Albanian, Literature
Other Scripts: عائدة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘A-ee-dah(Arabic) ah-EE-də(English)
Rating: 54% based on 20 votes
Variant of AYDA. This name was used in Verdi's opera Aida (1871), where it belongs to an Ethiopian princess held captive in Egypt.
ALBA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: AL-ba(Italian, Spanish) AL-bə(Catalan)
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALBACHIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: AHL-bah-kee-AH-rah
Rating: 53% based on 19 votes
Combination of Alba and CHIARA. Use of this name is most likely influenced by the song 'Albachiara' by Vasco Rossi.
ALESSIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-LEHS-syo
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Italian form of ALEXIS.
ALFONSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: al-FON-so(Spanish) al-FAWN-so(Italian)
Rating: 56% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #941 (down 27)
Spanish and Italian form of a Visigothic Germanic name, probably meaning "noble and ready", from the element adal "noble" combined with funs "ready". Other theories claim the first element is hadu or hild (see ILDEFONSO), both of which mean "battle". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. This was the name of six kings of Portugal and kings of several ancient regions of Spain.
ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) a-LEE-sə(German) A-li-tseh(Czech)
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Popularity: the United States: #73 (down 2)
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

ALISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Variant of ALYSSA.
ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 18 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
ALMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-mə(English) AL-ma(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #616 (up 32)
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALVISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: al-VEE-zeh
Rating: 30% based on 16 votes
Venetian form of LOUIS.
AMARANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: a-ma-RAN-ta
Rating: 46% based on 13 votes
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMBRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 61% based on 15 votes
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMINTA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Form of AMYNTAS used by the Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his play Aminta (1573). In the play Aminta is a shepherd who falls in love with a nymph.
ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασία(Greek) Анастасия(Russian) Анастасія(Ukrainian, Belarusian) ანასტასია(Georgian) Ἀναστασία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-na-sta-SEE-a(Greek) u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə(Russian) u-nu-stu-SYEE-yu(Ukrainian) an-ə-STAY-zhə(English) a-na-STA-sya(Spanish) a-na-STA-zya(Italian) A-NA-STA-SEE-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Popularity: the United States: #150 (down 3)
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANEMONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEHM-ə-nee
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: an-JEHL-i-kə(English) an-JEH-lee-ka(Italian)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Popularity: the United States: #592 (down 45)
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their Orlando poems (1483 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Pronounced: a-NEE-ta(Spanish, German) ə-NEET-ə(English) ah-NEE-tah(Dutch) AH-nee-tah(Finnish) a-NYEE-ta(Polish)
Rating: 63% based on 11 votes
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANTONIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: an-to-NYEHT-ta
Rating: 53% based on 19 votes
Diminutive of ANTONIA.
APRILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: a-PREE-lya
Rating: 55% based on 15 votes
It comes from the Italian name of the month aprile (April). It is the name of a town in the same region of Rome which was given this name because it was established on April, 25 1936 during Fascism on a reclaimed swamps. It is also the name of a company making motorcycles and rollers. This name has been always rare. The latest year it was given to babies was in 2001 where less than five newborns were called Aprilia.
AQUILA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: AK-wil-ə(English) ə-KWIL-ə(English)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
ARIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Rating: 53% based on 15 votes
Popularity: the United States: #20 (down 1)
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
ASTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: as-TOR-ee-a(American English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of ASTOR.
ASTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
ATENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan (Rare), Croatian (Rare), Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Serbian
Rating: 52% based on 15 votes
Catalan, Croatian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese and Romanian form of ATHENA.
AUGUSTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-ta(Italian) ə-GUS-tə(English) ow-GUWS-ta(German)
Rating: 69% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AURELIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lyo
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
Italian and Spanish form of AURELIUS.
AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #40 (up 4)
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Pronounced: AH-veh
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Possibly from the name of the prayer Ave Maria, in which Ave is Latin meaning "greetings, salutations".
AZZURRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ad-DZOOR-ra
Rating: 50% based on 14 votes
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
BASILIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ba-ZEE-lyo(Italian) ba-SEE-lyo(Spanish)
Rating: 48% based on 17 votes
Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1).
BENIAMINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: beh-nya-MEE-no
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Italian form of BENJAMIN.
BIANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka(Italian) BYAN-ka(Romanian)
Rating: 73% based on 27 votes
Popularity: the United States: #452 (down 49)
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in Taming of the Shrew (1593) and Othello (1603).
BLU
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian (Modern), English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLOO
Rating: 36% based on 16 votes
Italian form of BLUE and English diminutive of BLUFORD.
BOSCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: BOH-sko
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Transferred use of the surname BOSCO borne by the catholic saint John Bosco (also known as Don Bosco).
BRANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 48% based on 18 votes
Germanic name derived from the element brand meaning "sword".
BRIGITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Hungarian
Pronounced: bree-GI-ta(German) BREE-geet-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 52% based on 20 votes
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRUNO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BROO-no(German, Italian, Spanish, Czech) BROO-noo(Portuguese) BRUY-NO(French) BROO-naw(Polish, Slovak)
Rating: 51% based on 19 votes
Popularity: the United States: #714 (down 49)
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
CALIMERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: kah-lee-MEH-rah
Rating: 54% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of CALIMERO.
CALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #705 (up 101)
Latinized form of KALLIOPE.
CAMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Popularity: the United States: #271 (up 32)
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
CARLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAR-lo
Rating: 51% based on 16 votes
Italian form of CHARLES.
CASIMIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: ka-see-MEE-ro(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 11 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of CASIMIR.
CASSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə(English) kə-SAHN-drə(English) kas-SAN-dra(Italian) ka-SAN-dra(German)
Rating: 95% based on 4 votes
Popularity: the United States: #611 (up 51)
From the Greek name Κασσάνδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κέκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CELESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #374 (up 69)
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κόρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Popularity: the United States: #71 (up 2)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 98% based on 5 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORINNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορίννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ko-RI-na(German) kə-REEN-ə(English) kə-RIN-ə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 22 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Κορίννα (Korinna), which was derived from κόρη (kore) meaning "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book Amores [1]. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem Corinna's going a-Maying [2].
CORNELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kawr-NEH-lya(German) kor-NEH-lya(Italian) kawr-NEH-lee-a(Dutch) kawr-NEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 23 votes
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
COSTANTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ko-STAN-te
Rating: 26% based on 12 votes
Italian form of CONSTANS. It is also a common-used adjective in Italian with the same meaning of the name.
DALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Rating: 70% based on 20 votes
Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
DALILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: DA-LEE-LA(French)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Form of DELILAH used in the Latin Old Testament, as well as in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese.
DAVIDE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DA-vee-deh
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Italian form of DAVID.
DELFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: dehl-FEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 59% based on 10 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of DELPHINA.
DEMETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, Greek
Other Scripts: Δήμητρα(Greek)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Italian and Romanian form of DEMETER (1), as well as an alternate transcription of Greek Δήμητρα (see DIMITRA).
DEMETRIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: deh-MEH-tryo
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Italian and Spanish form of DEMETRIUS.
DIAMANTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Judeo-Italian
Pronounced: dya-MAN-te(Italian)
Rating: 42% based on 14 votes
Directly from the Italian word diamante meaning "diamond".
DIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian) Діана(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) dyee-AH-nu(Ukrainian) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Latin)
Rating: 95% based on 4 votes
Popularity: the United States: #212 (down 29)
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DILETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: dee-LEHT-ta
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "beloved" in Italian, from Latin dilectus.
DOMITILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: do-mee-TEEL-la(Italian)
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
ELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Estonian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Елена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic) Έλενα(Greek)
Pronounced: EH-leh-na(Italian, German) eh-LEH-na(Spanish) yi-LYEH-nə(Russian) i-LYEH-nə(Russian) EHL-ə-nə(English) ə-LAY-nə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 21 votes
Popularity: the United States: #60 (up 6)
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELEONORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Swedish, Latvian, Dutch, Polish, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Greek
Other Scripts: Елеонора(Bulgarian, Ukrainian) Элеонора(Russian) Ελεονώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-leh-o-NAW-ra(Italian) eh-leh-o-NO-ra(German) eh-leh-aw-NAW-ra(Polish) eh-lyi-u-NO-rə(Russian)
Rating: 74% based on 17 votes
Form of ELEANOR in several languages.
ELISABETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lee-za-BEHT-ta
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
Italian form of ELIZABETH.
ELOISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lo-EE-za
Rating: 69% based on 17 votes
Italian form of ELOISE.
ELSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Icelandic, Finnish, Italian
Pronounced: EHL-sə(English) EHL-za(German) EHL-sah(Finnish)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Popularity: the United States: #786 (up 103)
Short form of ELISABETH.
ERACLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: E-ra-kle
Rating: 20% based on 9 votes
Italian rare form of ERCOLE, ultimately from Ancient Greek HERAKLES.
ERICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Italian
Pronounced: EHR-i-kə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #0 (down 99)
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 68% based on 22 votes
Popularity: the United States: #379 (down 3)
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Italian, Czech, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ehs-TEHR(Spanish) əs-TEHR(Catalan) EHS-tehr(Czech, Finnish)
Rating: 66% based on 10 votes
Form of ESTHER used in several languages.
FABRIZIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fa-BREET-tsyo
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
Italian form of Fabricius (see FABRICE).
FERNANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fehr-NAN-do(Spanish)
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Popularity: the United States: #315 (down 5)
Spanish and Portuguese form of FERDINAND.
FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FILIPPO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fee-LEEP-po
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
Italian form of PHILIP.
FLAVIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: FLA-vyo(Italian) FLA-byo(Spanish)
Rating: 38% based on 14 votes
Italian and Spanish form of FLAVIUS.
FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(German, Spanish) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Rating: 73% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #936 (up 65)
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FRIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FREE-dah(Swedish)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Popularity: the United States: #728 (down 36)
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
GALATEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Other Scripts: Γαλατεια, Γαλάτεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ga-la-TE-a; ga-la-TAY-a(Italian)
Rating: 60% based on 16 votes
Latinized form of GALATEIA.
GELSOMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jehl-so-MEE-na
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
Italian form of JASMINE.
GERONIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: jə-RAWN-ə-mo(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Gerónimo, a Spanish form of Hieronymos (see JEROME). This is the better-known name of the Apache leader Goyathlay (1829-1909). It was given to him by the Mexicans, his enemies.
GIACOMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-ko-mo
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Italian form of Iacomus (see JAMES).
GIADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Italian form of JADE.
GIGLIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: JEE-lyo
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Italian cognate of GILLES. The name coincides with Italian giglio "lily".
GIGLIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: jee-LYO-lah
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Of debated origin and meaning. Even though folk etymology likes to derive this name from Italian giglio "lily" (Latin lilium), "a plant considered to symbolize the qualities of candor and purity", it is more likely derived from masculine GIGLIO or Gilio.
GILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: JEEL-da(Italian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
GINEVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEH-vra
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GIOIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JAW-ya
Rating: 51% based on 14 votes
Means "joy" in Italian.
GIORDANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jor-DA-no
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Italian form of JORDAN.
GIORGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JOR-jo
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Italian form of GEORGE.
GIOSUÈ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-ZWEH
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian form of JOSHUA.
GIUDITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-DEET-ta
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
Italian form of JUDITH.
GIULIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JOO-lyo
Rating: 45% based on 10 votes
Italian form of JULIUS.
GREGORIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: greh-GO-ryo(Italian) greh-GHO-ryo(Spanish)
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Gregorius (see GREGORY).
GUALTIERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Italian form of WALTER.
INDACO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: EEN-da-ko
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Italian form of INDIGO.
INES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 54% based on 12 votes
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
IRENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εἰρήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-REEN(English) ie-REE-nee(English) ee-REH-neh(Italian, Spanish) EE-reh-neh(Finnish) ee-REH-nə(German, Dutch)
Rating: 88% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #633 (up 5)
From Greek Εἰρήνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the Ὥραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.

This name has traditionally been more popular among Eastern Christians. In the English-speaking world it was not regularly used until the 19th century.

IRIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Italian variant of IRIS.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #129 (up 9)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: ირმა(Georgian)
Pronounced: IR-ma(German) UR-mə(English) EER-mah(Finnish) EER-ma(Spanish) EER-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
ISABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL-la(Italian) ee-za-BEH-la(German, Dutch) iz-ə-BEHL-ə(English) is-a-BEHL-la(Swedish) EE-sah-behl-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Popularity: the United States: #5 (down 1)
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

In the United States this form was much less common than Isabel until the early 1990s, when it began rapidly rising in popularity. It reached a peak in 2009 and 2010, when it was the most popular name for girls in America, an astounding rise over only 20 years.

A famous bearer is the Italian actress Isabella Rossellini (1952-).

ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: iz-ə-DAWR-ə
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
ISIDORO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ro(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ro(Italian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish and Italian form of ISIDORE.
ISOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZOT-ta
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
Italian form of ISOLDE.
IUNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latin form of JUNIA.
LAERTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Italian and Portuguese form of LAERTES.
LARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Лара(Russian)
Pronounced: LAHR-ə(English) LA-ra(German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch) LA-RA(French) LA-ru(Portuguese) LAW-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #701 (up 54)
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #701 (up 54)
Variant of LARUNDA.
LARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λάρισα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lə-RIS-ə(English) la-RI-sa(German)
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century, as a borrowing from Russian. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEH-a(German) LEH-ah(Finnish) LEH-aw(Hungarian)
Rating: 52% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #726 (down 17)
Form of LEAH used in several languages.
LEANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dro(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #614 (up 78)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LEANDER.
LEONARDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: leh-o-NAR-do(Italian) lee-ə-NAHR-do(English) leh-o-NAR-dho(Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 15 votes
Popularity: the United States: #86 (up 6)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the Mona Lisa. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: leh-O-neh
Rating: 26% based on 11 votes
Italian form of LEON.
LETIZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: leh-TEET-tsya
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Italian form of LETITIA. It was borne by Napoleon Bonaparte's mother.
LILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LEE-lya(Spanish) LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 66% based on 16 votes
Spanish and Italian form of LILY, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see LILIYA).
LILLÀ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: leel-LA
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Means "lilac (the plant)" in Italian.
LIVIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LEE-vya(Italian)
Rating: 56% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #761 (down 84)
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
LIVIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: LEE-vyo
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Italian form of LIVIUS.
LORELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: lo-RELL-lah
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of LAURA.
LUCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, French
Pronounced: LOO-cheh(Italian) LUYS(French)
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LUCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Latin diminutive of LUCIA. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome.
LUCINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-SIE-nə(English) loo-SEE-nə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
LUDOVICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: loo-do-VEE-ko
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
Latinate form of LUDWIG.
LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #16 (up 7)
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
MAIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μαῖα(Ancient Greek) მაია(Georgian)
Pronounced: MIE-A(Classical Greek) MAY-ə(English) MIE-ə(English) MIE-AH(Georgian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #525 (down 25)
From Greek μαῖα (maia) meaning "good mother, dame, foster mother", perhaps in origin a nursery form of μήτηρ (meter). In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.
MAIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: MIE-ya(Latin) MAY-ə(English) MIE-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #525 (down 25)
Probably from Latin maior meaning "greater". This was the name of a Roman goddess of spring, a companion (sometimes wife) of Vulcan. She was later conflated with the Greek goddess Maia. The month of May is named for her.
MALVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish (Rare), German, Danish, Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: MAHL-vah(Finnish)
Rating: 47% based on 11 votes
Short form of MALVINA. It may be partly inspired by Latin, Swedish and Finnish malva "mallow, hollyhock (flower)".
MARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָרָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAHR-ə(English) MAR-ə(English)
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #667 (up 12)
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).
MARALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian), South American
Rating: 59% based on 10 votes
Variant of Mara with diminutive -lina.
MARGHERITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mar-geh-REE-ta
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
Italian form of MARGARET. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
MARIARCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: mah-ree-AHR-kah
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
MARIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek, Hungarian, German, Polish
Other Scripts: Μαριέττα(Greek)
Pronounced: MAW-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.
MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρίνα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Popularity: the United States: #690 (down 11)
Feminine form of MARINUS.
MARINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ma-REE-no
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Italian and Spanish form of MARINUS.
MARISTELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 64% based on 13 votes
Italian form of MARISTELA.
MARTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian, Swedish, Icelandic, Latvian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Марта(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian) მართა(Georgian)
Pronounced: MAR-ta(Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German) MAR-tu(European Portuguese) MAKH-tu(Brazilian Portuguese) MAR-tə(Catalan) MAHR-TAH(Georgian)
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
Form of MARTHA used in various languages.
MARZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: MAR-tsya
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian form of MARCIA.
MASSIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: MAS-see-mo
Rating: 46% based on 14 votes
Italian form of MAXIMUS.
MEDEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
Other Scripts: Μήδεια(Ancient Greek) მედეა(Georgian)
Pronounced: mə-DEE-ə(English) MEH-DEH-AH(Georgian)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From Greek Μήδεια (Medeia), possibly derived from μήδομαι (medomai) meaning "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
MELANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman
Pronounced: meh-LA-nya(Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 55% based on 14 votes
Italian, Spanish and Polish form of MELANIE.
MICAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: mee-ka-EH-la(Spanish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHELANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-keh-LAN-jeh-lo(Italian) mie-kə-LAN-jə-lo(English)
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Combination of MICHAEL and ANGELO, referring to the archangel Michael. The Renaissance painter and sculptor Michelangelo Buonarroti, from Florence, was the man who created such great works of art as the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This name was also borne by the Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi, better known as Caravaggio.
MICHELE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-KEH-leh
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Italian form of MICHAEL.
MICOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian variant form of MICHAL (2) (the Italian biblical form being Mikal). This is the name of the heroine in Giorgio Bassani's novel The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1962).
MINA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Other Scripts: मीना(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi) மீனா(Tamil)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Popularity: the United States: #682 (down 57)
Means "fish" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu goddess Ushas as well as the daughter of the god Kubera.
MINERVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: Mee-rah
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Popularity: the United States: #454 (up 11)
Derived from Albanian mirë "good".
MIRANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: mi-RAN-də(English)
Rating: 71% based on 18 votes
Popularity: the United States: #444 (down 78)
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play The Tempest (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
MOIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MOI-rə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοῖρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοῖραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 72% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
NASTAGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Italian
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Derivative of ANASTASIO.
NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλία(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian, Bulgarian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 14 votes
Popularity: the United States: #103 (up 11)
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NEFERTITI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TEE-tee(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jjtj meaning "the beautiful one has come". Nefertiti was a powerful Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the principal wife of Akhenaton, the pharaoh that briefly imposed a monotheistic religion centered around the sun god Aton.
NEREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Sicilian, Galician
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of NEREO.
NEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: NEH-veh
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
Directly taken from Italian neve "snow".
NICCOLÒ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: neek-ko-LO
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Italian form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.
NICODEMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: nee-ko-DEH-mo(Italian) nee-ko-DHEH-mo(Spanish)
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of NICODEMUS.
NIVES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Croatian
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Italian form of NIEVES.
NORA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian
Pronounced: NAWR-ə(Irish, English) NO-ra(German)
Rating: 54% based on 17 votes
Popularity: the United States: #29 (up 1)
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play A Doll's House (1879).
NORMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Literature
Pronounced: NAWR-mə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera Norma (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Popularity: the United States: #51 (up 5)
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
OLGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gaw(Hungarian) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIMPIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Pronounced: o-LEEM-pya(Spanish) aw-LYEEM-pya(Polish) O-leem-pee-aw(Hungarian)
Rating: 63% based on 16 votes
Form of OLYMPIAS in several languages.
ORCHIDEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: awr-kee-DEH-ah
Rating: 47% based on 11 votes
Directly taken from Italian orchidea "orchid".
ORLANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: or-LAN-do
Rating: 59% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #722 (down 57)
Italian form of ROLAND, as used in the epic poems Orlando Innamorato (1483) by Matteo Maria Boiardo and Orlando Furioso (1532) by Ludovico Ariosto. A character in Shakespeare's play As You like It (1599) also bears this name, as does a city in Florida.
ORSOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: OR-so-la
Rating: 41% based on 10 votes
Italian form of URSULA.
OTTAVIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ot-TA-vyo
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Italian form of OCTAVIUS.
PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
PARIDE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Italian form of PARIS (1).
PATRIZIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: pa-TREET-tsyo
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
Italian form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEH-NEH-LO-PEH(Classical Greek) pə-NEHL-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 80% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #22 (up 4)
Probably derived from Greek πηνέλοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πήνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PERLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: PEHR-la
Rating: 49% based on 15 votes
Popularity: the United States: #0 (down 78)
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERSEFONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Italian form of PERSEPHONE.
PETRONILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a Latin name, a diminutive of Petronia, the feminine form of PETRONIUS. This was the name of an obscure 1st-century Roman saint, later believed to be a daughter of Saint Peter.
PETRONIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Galician
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Italian and Galician form of PETRONIUS.
PORFIRIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: por-FEE-ryo(Spanish)
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Greek name Πορφύριος (Porphyrios), which was derived from the word πορφύρα (porphyra) meaning "purple dye". This was the name of several early saints.
PRIMAVERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Medieval Italian, Spanish (Mexican, Rare), Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
Derived from Vulgar Latin prīmavēra "spring". The descendant word primavera is used in Asturian, Catalan, Galician, Italian, Portuguese (and Old Portuguese), Sicilian, and Spanish.
PRISCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə(English) preesh-SHEEL-la(Italian)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Popularity: the United States: #620 (down 44)
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his 1858 poem The Courtship of Miles Standish [1].
RACHELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ra-KEH-leh
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
Italian form of RACHEL.
RICCARDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: reek-KAR-do
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Italian form of RICHARD.
ROMEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: ro-MEH-o(Italian) RO-mee-o(English)
Rating: 63% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #346 (down 6)
Italian and Romanian form of the Late Latin Romaeus or Late Greek Ρωμαῖος (Romaios), which meant "from ROME" or "Roman". In medieval Italian this meant "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1596).
ROSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: RO-sa(Spanish, Dutch) RAW-za(Italian) RAW-zu(European Portuguese) HAW-zu(Brazilian Portuguese) RAW-zə(Catalan) RO-za(German) RO-zə(English)
Rating: 84% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #648 (down 9)
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the unrelated Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEHT-ta
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
RUGGERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: rood-JEH-ro
Rating: 26% based on 10 votes
Italian form of ROGER.
SAKARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SAH-kah-ree
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Finnish form of ZECHARIAH.
SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σελήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek) si-LEE-nee(English)
Rating: 63% based on 18 votes
Popularity: the United States: #856 (down 30)
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, a Titan. She was sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SERAFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: seh-ra-FEE-na(Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 78% based on 17 votes
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.
SERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə(English) seh-REH-na(Italian)
Rating: 64% based on 19 votes
Popularity: the United States: #423 (down 31)
From a Late Latin name that was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
SILVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, German, Dutch, English, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SEEL-vya(Italian) SEEL-bya(Spanish) ZIL-vya(German) SIL-vee-ə(English)
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan (Modern, Rare), German (Swiss, Rare), Russian (Archaic), Italian (Swiss), Italian (Rare), Galician
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Italian and Galician SIRO, Catalan SIR and Russian SIR.
STEFANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: STEH-fa-no
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
Italian form of STEPHEN.
STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 76% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #39 (down 1)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
SUSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Сусанна(Russian) שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew) Сꙋсанна(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-na(Italian) soo-ZAN-nə(Catalan) suy-SAN-na(Swedish) SOO-sahn-nah(Finnish) suw-SAN-nə(Russian) suy-SAH-na(Dutch) soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Σουσάννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

TALITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 59% based on 14 votes
Portuguese form of TALITHA, popular in Brazil.
TAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Lithuanian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Тамара(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Macedonian) თამარა(Georgian)
Pronounced: tu-MA-rə(Russian) TA-ma-ra(Czech, Slovak) tan-MA-ra(Polish) TAW-maw-raw(Hungarian) tə-MAR-ə(English) tə-MAHR-ə(English) TAM-ə-rə(English) ta-MA-ra(Spanish, Italian)
Rating: 65% based on 12 votes
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TITANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tie-TAY-nee-ə(American English) ti-TAH-nee-ə(British English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) where it is the name of the queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
TITUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: TEE-toos(Latin) TIE-təs(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #321 (down 11)
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.

This name appears in the New Testament belonging to a companion of Saint Paul. He became the first bishop of Crete and was the recipient of one of Paul's epistles. This was also the praenomen of all three Roman emperors of the 1st-century Flavian dynasty, and it is the name by which the second of them is commonly known to history. Shakespeare later used it for the main character in his tragedy Titus Andronicus (1593). As an English name, Titus has been occasionally used since the Protestant Reformation.

TOLOMEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Galician
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Italian and Galician form of Ptolemaios via PTOLEMAEUS.
TOPAZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: to-PA-tsya, to-PA-tsee-a
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Elaborated from the Italian word topazio meaning "topaz".

A notable bearer was Italian painter Topazia Alliata (1913-2015).

TORQUATO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: tor-QWA-to(Italian)
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Italian and Portuguese form of TORQUATUS. This name was borne by Italian author Torquato Tasso.
TOSCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Theatre
Rating: 73% based on 10 votes
This name was popularized by Puccini's opera "Tosca" (1900) and its main character Floria Tosca.
The name is said to be derived from the Late Roman byname Tusca, the feminine form of Tuscus, meaning "from Tuscia" or "Etruscan". Nowadays, however, it is often interpreted to mean "from Tuscany", although historical Tuscia comprised a much larger area, including a great part of Umbria and the northern parts of Lazio.

There is also an obscure Saint Tosca who is claimed to have been a virign hermit from Verona. Her feast day is May 5.

TULLIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Archaic)
Pronounced: TOOL-lyo-la or tool-LYO-la
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Altered feminine form of TULLIO. CICERO used this nickname for his beloved daughter (called TULLIA).
ULISSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: oo-LEES-seh
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Italian form of ULYSSES.
URSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: UR-sə-lə(English) UR-syoo-lə(English) UWR-zoo-la(German) OOR-soo-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VALENTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
Popularity: the United States: #628 (up 17)
Italian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VANESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: və-NEHS-ə(English) VA-NEH-SA(French) va-NEH-sa(German)
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #269 (down 39)
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his 1726 poem Cadenus and Vanessa [1]. He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian, Belarusian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 88% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #252 (up 5)
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERDIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Medieval Italian
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Contracted form of VERIDIANA, which itself is a variant form of VIRIDIANA. This was the name of an Italian saint from the 13th century AD.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #359 (down 2)
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-yo-la(Czech)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
VIOLANTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-teh(Italian)
Rating: 34% based on 10 votes
Latin form of YOLANDA.
VIOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта(Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LEHT-ta(Italian) vyi-u-LYEHT-tə(Russian) VEE-o-leht-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of VIOLET.
VITTORIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: veet-TAW-ryo
Rating: 46% based on 11 votes
Italian form of VICTORIUS.
VIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: vee-VYA-na(Italian) bee-BYA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Popularity: the United States: #419 (no change)
Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.
ZEFIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: DZE-fee-ro
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Variant of ZEFFIRO.
ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Czech, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English) DZO-eh(Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Popularity: the United States: #38 (up 2)
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century.

As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).

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