ophelia's Personal Name List

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 62% based on 9 votes
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ALANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Rating: 52% based on 19 votes
Feminine form of ALAN.
ALENA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: A-leh-na(Czech, Slovak)
Rating: 46% based on 18 votes
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.
ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 64% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dree-ə
Rating: 65% based on 21 votes
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. Alexander the Great founded several cities by this name (or renamed them) as he extended his empire eastward. The most notable of these is Alexandria in Egypt, founded by Alexander in 331 BC.
ALISTAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַלוֹנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of ALON (1).
ALONSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-LON-so
Rating: 33% based on 15 votes
Spanish variant of ALFONSO.
ALUDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 24% based on 10 votes
Derived from Arabic العذرا (al-'adhra) meaning "the maiden". This is the name of a star in the constellation Canis Major.
AMADEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs(English) ahm-ə-DEE-əs(English)
Rating: 45% based on 13 votes
Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.
AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian, Polish) ah-MAY-lee-ah(Dutch) a-MEH-lee-a(German)
Rating: 69% based on 16 votes
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

AMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
Rating: 52% based on 13 votes
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANDROMEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ανδρομεδα, Ανδρομεδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Rating: 53% based on 16 votes
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος) combined with μεδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN(French, English) A-neh(Swedish) A-nə(Danish, German) AHN-neh(Finnish) AH-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
French form of ANNA. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.

The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in Anne of Green Gables (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

APOLLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Απολλων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-PAHL-o(English)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo meaning "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
ARIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Rating: 60% based on 16 votes
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
ARKADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Rating: 30% based on 13 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ART
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHRT
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Short form of ARTHUR.
ARTHUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
Rating: 62% based on 17 votes
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 66% based on 12 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
ATALANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αταλαντη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 33% based on 13 votes
From the Greek Αταλαντη (Atalante) meaning "equal in weight", derived from αταλαντος (atalantos), a word related to ταλαντον (talanton) meaning "a scale, a balance". In Greek legend she was a fast-footed maiden who refused to marry anyone who could not beat her in a race. She was eventually defeated by Hippomenes, who dropped three golden apples during the race causing her to stop to pick them up.
ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Αθηνα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 15 votes
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αττικος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
Latinized form of Greek Αττικος (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
AURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αυρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Classical Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 61% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURELIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of AURELIANUS.
AURELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-oos(Classical Latin) aw-REEL-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Roman family name that was derived from Latin aureus meaning "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Classical Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 63% based on 17 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AUTUMN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
Rating: 49% based on 15 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
AVALON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lahn
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit that was often linked with paradise.
AVIA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Modern Hebrew form of ABIJAH.
AYELET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיֶלֶת(Hebrew)
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
BEATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-triks(German) BEH-a-triks(German) BEH-aw-treeks(Hungarian) BEH-ya-triks(Dutch) BEE-ə-triks(English) BEE-triks(English)
Rating: 71% based on 14 votes
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.

In England the name became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, more commonly in the spelling Beatrice. Famous bearers include the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit, and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (1938-).

BEAUMONT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-mahnt
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
BÉLA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: BEH-law
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from Hungarian bél meaning "guts, bowel" or Slavic бѣлъ (belu) meaning "white". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.
BELLATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
BELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHL
Rating: 47% based on 12 votes
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.
BENEDETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: beh-neh-DEHT-ta
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Italian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENOÎTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BU-NWAT
Rating: 20% based on 11 votes
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BLÁITHÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 9 votes
Variant of BLÁTHNAT using a different diminutive suffix.
BOUDICCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Pronounced: BOO-di-kə(English)
Rating: 24% based on 12 votes
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide. Her name is first recorded in Roman histories, as Boudicca by Tacitus and Βουδουικα (Boudouika) by Cassius Dio.
BRIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRIDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 23% based on 12 votes
Anglicized diminutive of BRÍD.
BRIGHID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BREED(Irish) BREE-yeed(Irish)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian, Latvian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: BRI-gi-ta(Czech) BREE-gee-ta(Slovak)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Form of BRIDGET in several languages.
BRISEIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Βρισηις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: brie-SEE-is(English)
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Patronymic derived from Βρισευς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
CAITLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KAT-lyeen(Irish) KAYT-lin(English)
Rating: 56% based on 10 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KEHR-ə, KAR-ə
Rating: 51% based on 13 votes
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARADOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ka-RA-dawk
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Variant of CARADOG.
CAROLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CARRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ee, KEHR-ee
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CASPIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən(English)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
CĂTĂLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: kə-tə-LEEN
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Romanian masculine form of KATHERINE.
CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHD-rik
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886).
CENRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "ruler".
CHARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ(English) SHARL(French)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as Great Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities, French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the Peanuts comic strip.

CHARLIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAHR-lee
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz.
CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KYEE-ran, KEE-rawn
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 58% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Rating: 41% based on 11 votes
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
French form of QUIRINUS.
DAAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: DAN
Rating: 14% based on 11 votes
Short form of DANIËL.
DAMIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-na
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Italian feminine form of DAMIAN.
DAMIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-MYEHN
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
French form of DAMIAN.
DAN (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: DAN(English, Spanish, French, Romanian, Czech) DAHN(Swedish)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Short form of DANIEL.
DANICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даница(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DA-nee-tsa(Serbian, Croatian) DA-nyee-tsa(Slovak) DAN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DANNY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAN-ee
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-PNEH(Classical Greek) DAF-nee(English) DAHF-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DARCY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Rating: 58% based on 14 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

DIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Classical Latin)
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DRACO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δρακων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DRAY-ko(English)
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRAGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Драгана(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of DRAGAN.
DRAGOMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Драгомир(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
DRAGUTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Драгутин(Serbian)
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRUSILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: droo-SIL-ə(English)
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
ÉABHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AY-va
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Irish form of EVE.
ECHO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ηχω(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-ko(English)
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
Means "echo" from the word for the repeating reflected sound, which derives from Greek ηχη (eche) meaning "sound". In Greek mythology Echo was a nymph given a speech impediment by Hera, so that she could only repeat what others said. She fell in love with Narcissus, but her love was not returned, and she pined away until nothing remained of her except her voice.
EDMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 11 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

EIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AY-yah
Rating: 32% based on 10 votes
Possibly from the Finnish happy exclamation eijaa.
EIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 59% based on 13 votes
Means "snow" in Welsh.
EIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".
ELECTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ηλεκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEHK-trə(English)
Rating: 21% based on 11 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELFRIEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELIA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-LEE-a
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Italian form of ELIJAH.
ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλιας(Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Rating: 41% based on 11 votes
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Rating: 55% based on 12 votes
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: EHL-ə(English) EHL-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.
ELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee
Rating: 30% based on 11 votes
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.
ELRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Pronounced: EHL-rik(English)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC. Both were rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ELROND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "star dome" in Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Elrond was the elven ruler of Rivendell.
ELVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
Anglicized form of AILBHE.
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyə(German) eh-MEE-lee-eh(Norwegian) EHM-i-lee(Swedish)
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish)
Rating: 49% based on 12 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem Henry and Emma (1709) [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

EMRYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Welsh form of AMBROSE. Emrys Wledig (or Ambrosius Aurelianus) was a Romano-British military leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century. Tales of his life were used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth to create the character of Merlin, who he called Merlinus Ambrosius or Myrddin Emrys.
ÉOWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win(English)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 47% based on 11 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESPERANZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-peh-RAN-tha(European Spanish) ehs-peh-RAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
ETHELDREDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros) meaning "good of man", derived from ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV(English)
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century, with the latter being more common.

EVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EE-vee, EHV-ee
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
FAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy", ultimately (via Old French) from Latin fata meaning "the Fates". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In some cases it may be used as a short form of FAITH.
FFION
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: FEE-awn, FI-awn
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
Means "foxglove" in Welsh.
FINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 17% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of JOZEFINA.
FINN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 69% based on 12 votes
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
FIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: fee-O-nə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by the Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1762), in which it is spelled as Fióna.
FIONN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: FYOON(Irish) FYEEN(Irish) FIN(English)
Rating: 59% based on 9 votes
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
FIORELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyo-REHL-la
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya(Italian) FLA-bya(Spanish)
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLEUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR(French, Dutch) FLUR(English)
Rating: 64% based on 11 votes
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
FLORENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FLAWR-əns(English) FLAW-RAHNS(French)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.

The name can also be given in reference to the city in Italy, as in the case of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). She was a nurse in British hospitals during the Crimean War and is usually considered the founder of modern nursing.

FLYNN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLIN
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".
FÓLKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Old Norse form of FOLKE.
FOSTER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWS-tər
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that has several different origins: see FOSTER (1), FOSTER (2), FOSTER (3) and FOSTER (4).
FOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FREYR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Pronounced: FRAYR(English, Icelandic)
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he was one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
GALADRIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: gə-LAD-ree-əl(English)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּלְיָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
Variant of GAL (1).
GARNET (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHR-nət
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Rating: 65% based on 12 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENEVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-veev
Rating: 70% based on 12 votes
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GEORGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Γεωργια(Greek)
Pronounced: JAWR-jə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 11 votes
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).
GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jawr-jee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
GIDEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GIDIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval French
Rating: 14% based on 9 votes
Medieval French form of Aegidius (see GILES).
GINNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-ee
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEHL(French) ji-ZEHL(English)
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GODIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Pronounced: gə-DIE-və(English)
Rating: 19% based on 10 votes
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GORMLAITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Derived from Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "princess, lady". This was the name of a wife of the 11th-century Irish ruler Brian Boru.
GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the Old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sebros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GUNTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: GUWN-tu
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEHN
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.
GWENDOLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
GWENDOLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Rating: 66% based on 12 votes
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
GWENHWYFAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Rating: 35% based on 10 votes
Welsh form of GUINEVERE.
HAMLET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Armenian
Other Scripts: Համլետ(Armenian)
Pronounced: HAM-lət(English)
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Anglicized form of the Danish name Amleth. Shakespeare used this name for the Prince of Denmark in his play Hamlet (1600), which he based upon earlier Danish tales.
HAMNET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of HAMO. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play Hamlet.
HARMONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Αρμονια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Means "harmony, agreement" in Greek. She was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, given by Zeus to Cadmus to be his wife.
HAYLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Rating: 29% based on 8 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous [1].
HECATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Εκατη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-ə-tee(English)
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
From the Greek ‘Εκατη (Hekate), possibly derived from ‘εκας (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of HELEN.
HENRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Finnish
Pronounced: AHN-REE(French) HEHN-ree(Finnish)
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
French form of HENRY.
HENRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHN-ree
Rating: 69% based on 12 votes
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was usually rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the later Middle Ages it was fairly popular, and was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947), and American actor Henry Fonda (1905-1982).

HOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-ee
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HUGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-goo(Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
ILANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אִילָנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of ILAN.
ILYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Илья(Russian) Ілья(Belarusian)
Pronounced: i-LYA(Russian)
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
Russian and Belarusian form of ELIJAH.
INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
Rating: 67% based on 11 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IRELAND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: IER-lənd
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
IRENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovak, Lithuanian
Other Scripts: Ирена(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ee-REH-na(Polish) I-reh-na(Czech) EE-reh-na(Slovak)
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Form of IRENE in several languages.
IRÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EE-REHN
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
French form of IRENE.
IRENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ειρηνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-REEN(English) ie-REE-nee(English) ee-REH-neh(Italian, Spanish) EE-reh-neh(Finnish) ee-REH-nə(German, Dutch)
Rating: 59% based on 11 votes
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.

This name has traditionally been more popular among Eastern Christians. In the English-speaking world it was not regularly used until the 19th century.

ISABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-ZA-BEHL(French) IZ-ə-behl(English) ee-za-BEH-lə(German) ee-sah-BEHL-lə(Dutch)
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
French form of ISABEL.
ISEULT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOOLT(English) i-ZOOLT(English)
Rating: 29% based on 8 votes
Medieval variant of ISOLDE.
IVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
Pronounced: IE-vawr(English) EE-vawr(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
JAAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
Estonian form of JOHN.
JAMIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: JAY-mee
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 62% based on 12 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 69% based on 13 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAY (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAY
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JEANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHAN(French) JEEN(English)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This has been the most reliably popular French name for girls since the 13th century. Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
JEHANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JENNIFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-i-fər(English) JEH-ni-fu(German)
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma (1906). It barely ranked in the United until the late 1930s, when it began steadily growing in popularity, accelerating into the early 1970s. It was the most popular name for girls in America between 1970 and 1984, though it was not as common in the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include actress Jennifer Aniston (1969-) and singer/actress Jennifer Lopez (1969-).

JENNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-ee(English) YEH-nuy(Swedish) YEH-nee(German)
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JESPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: YEHS-bu(Danish) YEHS-pehr(Swedish)
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Danish form of JASPER.
JESS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHS
Rating: 26% based on 9 votes
Short form of JESSE or JESSICA.
JESSICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHS-i-kə(English) ZHEH-SEE-KA(French) YEH-see-ka(German, Dutch) YEHS-si-ka(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. It reached its peak of popularity in the United States in 1987, and was the top ranked name for girls between 1985 and 1995, excepting 1991 and 1992 (when it was unseated by Ashley). Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JETHRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִתְרוֹ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JETH-ro(English)
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name יִתְרוֹ (Yitro), which was derived from the Hebrew word יֶתֶר (yeter) meaning "abundance". According to the Old Testament, Jethro was a Midianite priest who sheltered Moses when he fled Egypt. He was the father of Zipporah, who became Moses's wife. A famous bearer of the name was Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English inventor and agriculturist.
JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON
Rating: 29% based on 8 votes
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century. It again became quite popular in the first half of the 20th century, entering the top ten names for both the United States and the United Kingdom, though it has since faded.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

Other notable bearers include the actress Joan Crawford (1904-1977) and the comedian Joan Rivers (1933-2014), both Americans.

JOANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Biblical
Pronounced: jo-AN-ə(English) yaw-AN-na(Polish)
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JOHANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YO-han
Rating: 17% based on 6 votes
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN(American English) JAWN(British English, Dutch) YAWN(Swedish, Norwegian)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular, typically being the most common male name from the 13th to the 20th century (but sometimes outpaced by William). During the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys. In the United States it was the most common name for boys until 1923.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

The forms Ian (Scottish), Sean (Irish) and Evan (Welsh) have also been frequently used in the English-speaking world, as has the medieval diminutive Jack.

JONATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English) YO-na-tan(German) ZHAW-NA-TAHN(French)
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote Gulliver's Travels and other works.

JULES (2)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOOLZ
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.
JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия(Russian) Юлія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə(English) YOO-lya(German, Danish, Polish) YOO-lee-ah(Swedish, Finnish) KHOO-lya(Spanish) YOO-lyi-yə(Russian) YOO-lee-a(Classical Latin)
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-YA-na(Dutch) yoo-LYA-na(German) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English) khoo-LYA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Polish, English
Pronounced: yoo-LYAN-na(Polish) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 70% based on 14 votes
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
JULIETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUY-LYEHT
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
French diminutive of JULIE.
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
KATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT(English)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
KATIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-tee
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of KATE.
KATJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Slovene
Pronounced: KAT-ya(German) KAHT-yah(Dutch)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Form of KATYA in various languages.
KAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-lə
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera Days of Our Lives [1].
KEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEER-ə
Rating: 57% based on 9 votes
Variant of CIARA (1). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KILLIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 58% based on 9 votes
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.
LARKIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Pronounced: LAHR-kin(English)
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ληδα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-DA(Classical Greek) LEE-də(English) LAY-də(English)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
LEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEIF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LAYF
Rating: 68% based on 9 votes
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
LENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена(Russian) Λενα(Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-na(Swedish, German, Polish, Italian) LYEH-nə(Russian) LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 9 votes
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LILAC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LIE-lək
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: LIN
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Short form of LINNÉA and other names containing the same sound.
LINNET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NEHT, LIN-it
Rating: 17% based on 6 votes
Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.
LIVIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LEE-vya(Italian)
Rating: 68% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
LIVIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Roman family name that may be related to either Latin liveo "to envy" or lividus "blue, envious". Titus Livius, also known as Livy, was a Roman historian who wrote a history of the city of Rome.
LIZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIZ
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH. This is the familiar name of actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-).
LIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian
Other Scripts: Лиза(Russian)
Pronounced: LIE-zə(English) LEE-zə(English)
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH or YELIZAVETA.
LOKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: LO-kee(English)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from the Germanic root *luka meaning "knot, lock". In Norse legend Loki was a trickster god associated with magic and fire. Over time he became more and more evil, and he was eventually chained to a rock by the other gods.
LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a(Italian) loo-TSEE-a(German) LOO-tsya(German) LOO-shə(English) loo-SEE-ə(English) luy-SEE-a(Swedish) LOO-chya(Romanian) LOO-kee-a(Classical Latin)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan(Romanian) LOO-shən(English)
Rating: 48% based on 9 votes
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUDWIG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LOOT-vikh
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
From the Germanic name Chlodovech meaning "famous battle", composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
MADELIEF
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Derived from Dutch madeliefje meaning "daisy".
MÆJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: MIE-yah
Icelandic diminutive of MARIA.
MAGDALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, English
Other Scripts: Магдалена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: mag-da-LEH-na(Polish) mak-da-LEH-na(German) magh-dha-LEH-na(Spanish) məg-də-LEH-nə(Catalan) MAG-da-leh-na(Czech) mag-də-LAY-nə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
Latinate form of MAGDALENE.
MAGNOLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mag-NO-lee-ə
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
MAIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μαια(Ancient Greek) მაია(Georgian)
Pronounced: MIE-A(Classical Greek) MAY-ə(English) MIE-ə(English) MIE-AH(Georgian)
Rating: 64% based on 9 votes
From Greek μαια (maia) meaning "good mother, dame, foster mother", perhaps in origin a nursery form of μητηρ (meter). In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.
MAIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Combination of MAIR and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
MAJA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Маја(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MA-ya(German, Polish)
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.
MARA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Мара(Serbian)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Hungarian variant of MÁRIA, and a Croatian and Serbian variant of MARIJA.
MARCEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Pronounced: MAR-SEHL(French) mər-SEHL(Catalan) mar-CHEHL(Romanian) MAR-tsehl(Polish, Czech, Slovak) mahr-SEHL(Dutch) mar-SEHL(German)
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Form of MARCELLUS used in several languages. Notable bearers include the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922) and the French artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968).
MARCELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-CHEHL-la(Italian)
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARIAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-ee-ən, MAR-ee-ən
Rating: 66% based on 10 votes
Variant of MARION (1). This name was borne in English legend by Maid Marian, Robin Hood's love. It is sometimes considered a combination of MARY and ANN.
MARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Danish, Biblical
Other Scripts: Марк(Russian)
Pronounced: MAHRK(English, Dutch) MARK(Russian)
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Form of Latin MARCUS used in several languages. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. He took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MATHÚIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MA-hoon
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Modern Irish form of MATHGHAMHAIN.
MAXIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech
Other Scripts: Максим(Russian, Ukrainian) Максім(Belarusian)
Pronounced: muk-SYEEM(Russian) MAK-sim(Czech)
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Максим or Belarusian Максім (see MAKSIM) or Ukrainian Максим (see MAKSYM). This is also the Czech form.
MAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MÉABH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MYEHV(Irish)
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Variant of MEDB.
MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHD-o
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MEDEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
Other Scripts: Μηδεια(Ancient Greek) მედეა(Georgian)
Pronounced: mə-DEE-ə(English) MEH-DEH-AH(Georgian)
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
From Greek Μηδεια (Medeia), possibly derived from μηδομαι (medomai) meaning "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
MEDRAUT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Welsh form of MORDRED.
MERLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: MUR-lin(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".

Geoffrey based parts of Merlin's character on Myrddin Wyllt, a semi-legendary madman and prophet who lived in the Caledonian Forest. Other parts of his life were based on that of the historical 5th-century Romano-British military leader Ambrosius Aurelianus. In Geoffrey's version of the tales and later embellishments Merlin is a wizard and counselor for King Arthur.

MERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHR-ik
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.
MILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Мила(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Міла(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: MI-la(Czech)
Rating: 58% based on 9 votes
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: MI-la-da(Czech) MEE-la-da(Slovak)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear". It has become associated with Czech/Slovak mladý "young".
MILENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Italian
Other Scripts: Милена(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Russian)
Pronounced: MI-leh-na(Czech) myee-LEH-na(Polish) myi-LYEH-nə(Russian) MEE-leh-na(Slovak) mee-LEH-na(Italian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: MIE-lo(English)
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century [2].
MINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Limburgish
Pronounced: MEE-nə(English) MEE-nah(Dutch, Limburgish)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MIRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Other Scripts: Мира(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: MYEE-ra(Polish)
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Latinate form of MIRABELLE.
MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Basque form of MARIA.
MIRUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Possibly derived from the Slavic word mir meaning "peace" or Romanian mira meaning "to wonder, to astound".
MOE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MO
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: MO-nə(English)
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the Mona Lisa (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MONET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From a French surname that was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
MONTAGUE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAHN-tə-gyoo
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "pointed mountain" in French. In Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1596) this is the surname of Romeo and his family.
MORDRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
From Welsh Medraut, possibly from Latin moderatus meaning "controlled, moderated". In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur. Mordred first appears briefly (as Medraut) in the 10th-century Annales Cambriae, but he was not portrayed as a traitor until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. While Arthur is away he seduces his wife Guinevere and declares himself king. This prompts the battle of Camlann, which leads to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur.
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 63% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORTIMER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAWR-tə-mər
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.
MORWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish, Welsh
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Variant of MORWENNA.
MYLES (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
Rating: 66% based on 9 votes
Variant of MILES.
NAVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: נָאוָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Means "beautiful" in Hebrew.
NESS (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of NEAS.
NEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of NIAMH.
NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay(English)
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French Lancelot-Grail cycle.
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Rating: 62% based on 12 votes
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
NYX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νυξ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NUYKS(Classical Greek) NIKS(English)
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
OLIVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AHL-iv(English) AW-LEEV(French)
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

OLIVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
Pronounced: O-LEE-VEE(French)
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: AW-LEE-VYEH(French) O-lee-veer(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 66% based on 12 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ωριων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 65% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown, but possibly related to Greek ‘οριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
OSWALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Anglo-Saxon [1]
Pronounced: AHZ-wawld(English) AWS-valt(German)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AHZ-win
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman Conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OZ (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWZ
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) meaning "all" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl(English)
Rating: 56% based on 10 votes
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the Story of the Grail. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
PERCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PUR-see
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name that was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include Adonais and Ozymandias. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PEREDUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: peh-REH-dir(Welsh)
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
PEREGRINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-grin
Rating: 72% based on 11 votes
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PERSEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσευς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEWS(Classical Greek) PUR-see-əs(English)
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
Possibly derived from Greek περθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Perseus was a hero who was said to have founded the ancient city of Mycenae. He was the son of Zeus and Danaë. Mother and child were exiled by Danaë's father Acrisius, and Perseus was raised on the island of Seriphos. The king of the island compelled Perseus to kill the Gorgon Medusa, who was so ugly that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone. After obtaining winged sandals and other tools from the gods, he succeeded in his task by looking at Medusa in the reflection of his shield and slaying her in her sleep. On his return he defeated a sea monster in order to save Andromeda, who became his wife.
PETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər(English) PEH-tu(German) PEH-tər(Dutch, Danish, Slovene) PEH-tehr(Slovak)
Rating: 71% based on 11 votes
Derived from Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century [1].

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

POPPY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAHP-ee
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
RAFAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) ha-fa-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) RA-fa-ehl(German)
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
Form of RAPHAEL in various languages.
RAFE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAYF
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAOUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Italian
Pronounced: RA-OOL(French)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
French form of Radulf (see RALPH).
RAPHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Ραφαηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RA-fa-ehl(German) RAF-ee-əl(English) RAF-ay-ehl(English) rah-fie-EHL(English)
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

REGIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 26% based on 8 votes
Old Germanic form of REIN (1).
RÉMY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: REH-MEE
Rating: 69% based on 10 votes
French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman, rower". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.
REUBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROO-bən(English)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
RHYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: REES
Rating: 71% based on 12 votes
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
RICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RICH
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Short form of RICHARD.
RICHARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: RICH-ərd(English) REE-SHAR(French) REE-khart(German, Slovak) RI-khart(Czech)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Means "brave ruler", derived from the Germanic elements ric "ruler, mighty" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.

During the late Middle Ages this name was typically among the five most common for males (with John, William, Robert and Thomas). It remained fairly popular through to the modern era, peaking in the United States in the 1940s and in the United Kingom a bit later, and steadily declining since that time.

Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), American physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988), British actor Richard Burton (1925-1984) and American musician Little Richard (1932-).

RIVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
Rating: 63% based on 11 votes
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English) RAW-BEHN(French) RAW-bin(Dutch)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: RAHJ-ər(English) RAWJ-ə(British English) RAW-ZHEH(French) roo-ZHEH(Catalan) RO-gu(German)
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROHESIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see ROSE).
RÓIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
From the vocative case of Irish rós meaning "rose" (a cognate of ROSE).
RÓISÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ro-SHEEN
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Irish rós meaning "rose" (a cognate of ROSE).
ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAW-man(Polish, Slovak) RO-man(Czech, German) RO-mən(English)
Rating: 65% based on 8 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
RÓNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RO-nahn
Rating: 70% based on 10 votes
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.
RORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROSABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Variant of ROSABEL.
ROSALIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RO-zə-lin, RAHZ-ə-lin
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Medieval variant of ROSALIND.
ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 77% based on 13 votes
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree
Rating: 74% based on 10 votes
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSWITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: raws-VEE-ta
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems and dramas.
ROTHAID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Variant of HRODOHAIDIS.
ROWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROZA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Роза(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: RO-zə(Russian)
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Means "rose" in some Slavic languages. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
ROZALIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Розалија(Macedonian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Form of ROSALIA in several languages.
ROŽĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 46% based on 7 votes
Means "rose" in Lithuanian. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
RUAIDHRÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROR-ee
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Means "red king" from Irish ruadh "red" combined with "king". This was the name of the last high king of Ireland, reigning in the 12th century.
RUAIRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Probably an Irish form of HRŒREKR, introduced by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. Alternatively it may be derived from Irish ruarc "squall, rainstorm".
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Rating: 66% based on 11 votes
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: ROO-na
Rating: 49% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of RUNE.
RUNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: ROO-nə(Norwegian) ROO-neh(Danish, Swedish)
Rating: 63% based on 9 votes
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
RÚNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1], Faroese
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Old Norse and Faroese form of RUNE.
SAPPHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Σαπφειρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə(English)
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a:(Dutch) ZAS-kya(German)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From the Germanic element sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Rating: 66% based on 11 votes
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SELMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Pronounced: SEHL-mə(English) ZEHL-ma(German)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SHALOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׁלוֹם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: sha-LOM
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
Means "peace" in Hebrew.
SHANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAN-ən
Rating: 50% based on 10 votes
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient" [1]. As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
SHERLOCK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SHUR-lahk(English)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Used by Scottish author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for his character Sherlock Holmes, who was a detective in Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887. The character's name was from an English surname meaning "shear lock", originally referring to a person with closely cut hair.
SHERWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHUR-wuwd
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From an English place name (or from a surname that was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σιλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

SILVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SIMON (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон(Macedonian) სიმონ(Georgian) Σιμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən(English) SEE-MAWN(French) SEE-mawn(Danish, Dutch) ZEE-mawn(German) SHEE-mon(Hungarian)
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became more rare after the Protestant Reformation.

SIOFRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEE-frə
Rating: 46% based on 7 votes
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.
SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SOL (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Rating: 56% based on 8 votes
Short form of SOLOMON.
SOLOMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish
Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən(American English) SAWL-ə-mən(British English)
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.

This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish. It was however borne by an 11th-century Hungarian king.

SPRITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: SPREE-ta
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Means "witty" in Esperanto.
STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SVANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Short form of SVANHILDUR.
SVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SVEHN
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn meaning "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SWANHILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Rating: 15% based on 6 votes
Variant of SWANHILD.
SWITHIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
TENNEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Medieval diminutive of DENIS.
TERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHR-ə
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Variant of TARA (1).
TEREZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Portuguese (Brazilian), Bulgarian, Romanian
Other Scripts: Тереза(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: TEH-reh-za(Czech) teh-REHZ-a(Romanian)
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Czech, Portuguese, Bulgarian and Romanian form of THERESA.
THIERRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: TYEH-REE
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
French form of THEODORIC.
TIFFANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIF-ə-nee
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.
TINUVIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "nightingale" in Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tinuviel was the daughter of Thingol the elf king and the beloved of Beren, who with her help retrieved one of the Silmarils from the iron crown of Morgoth.
VAUGHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: VAWN
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
From a Welsh surname that was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".
VERNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VURN-ən
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
From a Norman surname, which was from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder".
VERONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
From the name of the city in Italy, which is itself of unknown meaning.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VICTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Rating: 69% based on 14 votes
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: VYEHN
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From the French name of the capital city of Austria, known in English as Vienna.
VILTĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Short form of VILTAUTĖ.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-yo-la(Czech)
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
VITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Danish
Pronounced: VEE-ta(Italian)
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of VITUS.
VITALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of VITALE.
VLADIMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of VLADIMIR.
WENDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHN-dee
Rating: 53% based on 9 votes
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS-lee, WEHZ-lee
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEST-lee
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From a surname that was a variant of WESLEY.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang(German) WUWLF-gang(English)
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
YELIZAVETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Елизавета(Russian)
Pronounced: yi-lyi-zu-VYEH-tə, i-lyi-zu-VYEH-tə
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
Russian form of ELIZABETH. This was the name of an 18th-century Russian empress.
YEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Ева(Russian) Եվա(Armenian)
Pronounced: YEH-və(Russian)
Rating: 13% based on 7 votes
Russian and Armenian form of EVE.
YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Юрий(Russian) Юрій(Ukrainian) Юрый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee(Russian)
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Юрий, Ukrainian Юрій or Belarusian Юрый (see YURIY).
ZELDA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZEHL-də
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
Short form of GRISELDA.
ZENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown. It could be a variant of XENIA or a diminutive of names featuring this sound, such as ALEXINA, ROSINA or ZENOBIA. This name has occasionally been used since the 19th century.
ZITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: DZEE-ta(Italian) TSEE-ta(German) ZI-ta(Czech) ZEE-ta(Slovak)
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
ZIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of ZIV.
ZOÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Hungarian
Pronounced: ZAW-EH(French)
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
French and Hungarian form of ZOE.
ZOË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English, German
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English)
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
Dutch form and English and German variant of ZOE.
ZOFIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZAW-fya
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Polish form of SOPHIA.
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