pennydeadful's Personal Name List

Adelaide
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
Aikaterini
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Αικατερίνη(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-ka-teh-REE-nee
Alternate transcription of Greek Αικατερίνη (see Ekaterini).
Arabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of Annabel. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable, yielding to prayer".
Asal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: عسل(Persian)
Means "honey" in Persian (of Arabic origin).
Asel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Turkish
Other Scripts: Әсел(Kazakh) Асель(Kyrgyz)
From Arabic عَسَل ('asal) meaning "honey".
Asra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أسرى(Arabic)
Pronounced: AS-ra
Means "travel at night" in Arabic. It is related to Isra.
Aurelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Aurelius.
Ayla 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֵלָה(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אֵלָה (see Ela 3).
Ayla 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.
Aynur
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Other Scripts: ئاينۇر(Uyghur)
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Aysel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon flood" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon" and sel "flood, stream".
Basia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: BA-sha
Polish diminutive of Barbara.
Calista
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə(English) ka-LEES-ta(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Callistus. As an English name it might also be a variant of Kallisto.
Cassia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-a(Latin) KA-shə(English) KAS-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Cassius.
Celeste
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Italian feminine and masculine form of Caelestis. It is also the English feminine form.
Celestia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Dutch (Rare), English (American, Rare), Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: sə-LES-tee-ah(Dutch) sə-LEST-ee-ə(American English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Variant spelling of Caelestia, which is the feminine form of Caelestius.

Known bearers of this name include a daughter of the American mathematician and religious leader Orson Pratt (1811-1881) and the American abolitionist and philanthropist Laura Spelman Rockefeller (1839-1915), who carried the name as a middle name and was affectionately referred to as Cettie because of it.

In popular culture, this name is best known for being the name of princess Celestia, who is a character in the animated children's television series "My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic".

Cosima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-ma
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Italian feminine form of Cosimo.
Dafina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Дафина(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Means "laurel" in Albanian, Bulgarian and Macedonian, of Greek origin.
Darya 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: دریا(Persian)
Pronounced: dar-YAW
Means "sea, ocean" in Persian.
Delara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: دلآرا(Persian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "adorning the heart", from Persian دل (del) meaning "heart" and آرا (ara) meaning "decorate, adorn".
Delilah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
Derya
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: dehr-YA
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
Dilara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Turkish form of Delara.
Dzvezda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ѕвезда(Macedonian)
Pronounced: DZVEHZ-da
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "star" in Macedonian.
Eliora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of Elior.
Ester
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Italian, Czech, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ehs-TEHR(Spanish) əs-TEHR(Catalan) EHS-tehr(Czech, Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Form of Esther used in several languages.
Estera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Slovak, Romanian, Lithuanian
Pronounced: eh-STEH-ra(Polish)
Polish, Slovak, Romanian and Lithuanian form of Esther.
Esther
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Ἐσθήρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess Ishtar. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

Evren
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish. In Turkic mythology the Evren is a gigantic snake-like dragon.
Genevieve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-veev
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
English form of Geneviève.
Guinevere
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the Old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sebros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

Hadasa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַסָּה(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew הֲדַסָּה (see Hadassah).
Hadassah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַסָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
Hazal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "dried leaf, fallen leaf" in Turkish.
Hazel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
Helena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LAYN-ə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Latinate form of Helen.
İkra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Turkish form of Iqra.
İlayda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Possibly derived from the name of a Turkish water sprite.
İlknur
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "first light" in Turkish.
Iris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
Irmak
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "river" in Turkish.
Iskra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Искра(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
From a South Slavic word meaning "spark".
Jael
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָעֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-əl(English) JAYL(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
Kadriye
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Feminine form of Kadri 2.
Kalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Other Scripts: Калина(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ka-LYEE-na(Polish)
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.
Kasia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: KA-sha
Diminutive of Katarzyna.
Kazia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: KA-zha
Short form of Kazimiera.
Kelebek
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish (Rare)
Means "butterfly" in Turkish.
Kiraz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "cherry" in Turkish.
Ksenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Ксения(Russian) Ксенія(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: KSEH-nya(Polish) KSYEH-nyi-yə(Russian)
Polish form of Xenia, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Ксения or Ukrainian/Belarusian Ксенія (see Kseniya).
Leonore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: leh-o-NO-rə
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
German short form of Eleanor.
Lila 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIE-lə
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Variant of Leila.
Liora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Strictly feminine form of Lior.
Lorelei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
Lorenza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: lo-REHN-tsa(Italian) lo-REHN-tha(European Spanish) lo-REHN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1).
Ludivine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-DEE-VEEN
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Possibly from a feminine form of Leutwin. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the television miniseries Les Gens de Mogador.
Lulu 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LOO-loo
Diminutive of names that begin with Lu, especially Luise.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Nefeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Νεφέλη(Greek)
Modern Greek transcription of Nephele.
Valia
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Georgian (Rare), Greek, Russian
Other Scripts: Валя(Bulgarian, Russian) ვალია(Georgian) Βάλια(Greek)
In Bulgaria and Russia, this name is a variant transcription of the unisex name Valya.

In Georgia, this name is a diminutive of Valentina and Valerian, though there can certainly be cases where it is the georgianized form of the aforementioned Valya. In this day and age, Valia is primarily used on women in Georgia.

In Greece, this name is strictly feminine and is a pet form of Vasilia and Vasiliki.

Known bearers of this name include the Georgian revolutionary Valerian "Valia" Bakhtadze (1896-1930) and the Greek model Valia Kakouti (b. 1981).

Vasiliki
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Βασιλική(Greek)
Modern Greek feminine form of Basil 1.
Velora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
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