BuckeyedPeach86's Personal Name List

ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-gayl(English) A-bee-giel(German)
Rating: 70% based on 11 votes
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigail refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play The Scornful Lady (1616), which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ABRIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-bree-EL-a
Rating: 36% based on 10 votes
Variant of AUBRIELLA or a combination of the prefix a and BRIELLA.
ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
ADALYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AD-ə-lin
Rating: 40% based on 9 votes
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lynn.
ADRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, English, Dutch
Pronounced: a-dree-A-na(Italian, Dutch) adh-RYA-na(Spanish) a-DRYA-na(Polish) ay-dree-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
AINSLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AYNZ-lee(English)
Rating: 27% based on 9 votes
From a surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, English
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
Means "dwelling, abode". From the Buddhist term ālaya-vijñāna 'storehouse consciousness' as developed by the Yogācāra school of Indian Buddhism, referring to the place where a person's karma resides, the eighth level of consciousness that provides the base for the previous seven.

It's growing popularity may be due to it also being used as a variant of ALIYAH.

ALBANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Variant of ALBAN.
ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 73% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) A-li-tseh(Czech)
Rating: 74% based on 11 votes
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

ALISON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AL-i-sən(English) A-LEE-SAWN(French)
Rating: 72% based on 10 votes
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE) [1]. It was common in England, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in England in the 20th century via Scotland. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
AMARYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: am-ə-RIL-is(English)
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) meaning "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem Eclogues. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər(English) AHM-bər(Dutch)
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian, Polish) ah-MAY-lee-ah(Dutch) a-MEH-lee-a(German)
Rating: 72% based on 11 votes
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
ANGELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: an-JEHL-ee-ə
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
Elaborated form of ANGELA.
ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: an-JEHL-i-kə(English) an-JEH-lee-ka(Italian)
Rating: 74% based on 8 votes
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their Orlando poems (1483 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: an-na-BEHL-la(Italian) an-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLA.
ANNIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHN-nee-kah(Swedish, Dutch, Finnish) A-nee-ka(German) AN-i-kə(English) AHN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 86% based on 10 votes
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANNISTON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
Derived from the name of the city of Anniston in the state of Alabama. The city was founded in the late 19th century by Samuel Noble and Daniel Tyler, who named the city after the latter's daughter-in-law, Annie Tyler. As a result, the meaning of the name is literally "Annie's town".

In some cases, Anniston as a given name can also be a variant spelling of ANISTON.

A known bearer of this name is the youngest daughter of American actress Chyler Leigh (b. 1982) and her husband Nathan West (b. 1978).

ANNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 68% based on 9 votes
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 70% based on 10 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARAMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 78% based on 10 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) meaning "most" and αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: a-RYAN-na(Italian) ar-ee-AN-ə(English) ar-ee-AHN-ə(English)
Rating: 64% based on 9 votes
Italian form of ARIADNE.
ASPEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
AUBREY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWB-ree
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
AUDRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWD-rə
Rating: 72% based on 9 votes
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUDREY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWD-ree
Rating: 86% based on 10 votes
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Classical Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 46% based on 8 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
AVALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Variant of AVELINE.
AVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century [1].
AVERY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AVIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Variant of AVIANA.
AYLA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Created for the novel Clan of the Cave Bear (1980) by author Jean M. Auel. In the novel Ayla is an orphaned Cro-Magnon girl adopted by Neanderthals. Ayla is the Neanderthal pronunciation of her real name, which is not given.
AZALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) meaning "dry".
BLAIR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BLEHR(English)
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
From a Scottish surname that is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BRENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHN-ə
Rating: 75% based on 6 votes
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.
BRIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it(English)
Rating: 70% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BROOKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BRYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIN
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Feminine variant of BRYN.
CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
CALANTHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee-ə
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALLISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə
Rating: 72% based on 9 votes
Variant of CALISTA.
CARLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Contracted variant of CAROLINE.
CARMEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
CAROLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Rating: 78% based on 10 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə(English) kə-SAHN-drə(English) kas-SAN-dra(Italian) ka-SAN-dra(German)
Rating: 90% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 81% based on 8 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 80% based on 8 votes
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CELESTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Rating: 73% based on 8 votes
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CELESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHL-ə-steen
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CHARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Χαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAYR-is(English)
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kə-RIS-ə
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Elaborated form of CHARIS. Edmund Spencer used it in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
CHARLISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Variant of CHARLIZE.
CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Rating: 83% based on 7 votes
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλοη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee(English)
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHRYSANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Greek (Rare)
Pronounced: kri-SAN-ə(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Variant of CHRYSANTA.
CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
French form of CLARA.
CLARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian
Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Classical Latin)
Rating: 69% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
COLLINS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 23% based on 7 votes
Transferred use of the surname Collins (1) or Collins (2).
CORAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: KAWR-əl(English) ko-RAL(Spanish)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 66% based on 10 votes
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare), French (Rare), Italian
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Variant of CORALINE.
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORINNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοριννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ko-RI-na(German) kə-REEN-ə(English) kə-RIN-ə(English)
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) meaning "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book Amores. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem Corinna's going a-Maying.
CORINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAW-REEN(French) kə-REEN(English) kə-RIN(English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel Corinne (1807).
CRYSTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-təl
Rating: 56% based on 8 votes
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-zee
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DAKOTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-PNEH(Classical Greek) DAF-nee(English) DAHF-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 75% based on 10 votes
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DIR-drə(English) DIR-dree(English) DYEHR-dryə(Irish)
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from Old Irish der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' Deirdre (1907) and J. M. Synge's Deirdre of the Sorrows (1910).

DEVIN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHV-in
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Rating: 94% based on 8 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEANORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehl-ə-NAWR-ə
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of ELEANOR.
ELIANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English (Modern)
Pronounced: eh-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.
ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Rating: 93% based on 8 votes
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLISON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scots
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Scots form of ALISON.
ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Rating: 65% based on 8 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-bər
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
EMERY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 90% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 78% based on 8 votes
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
ERIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: EHR-in(English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), from ευ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Rating: 79% based on 10 votes
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem Evangeline (1847) [1]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Greek
Other Scripts: Εβελινα(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-veh-LEE-na(Italian, Swedish)
Rating: 95% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel Evelina (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name EVELYN or an elaboration of EVE.
EVELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
Rating: 80% based on 10 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(German, Spanish) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Rating: 78% based on 9 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GABRIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ga-bree-EHL-la(Italian) GAWB-ree-ehl-law(Hungarian) ga-bree-EHL-ə(English) gah-bree-EHL-lah(Swedish)
Rating: 57% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) gab-ree-EHL(English)
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jawr-jee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
GWYNETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English (Modern)
Pronounced: GWIN-eth(Welsh) GWIN-ith(English)
Rating: 76% based on 7 votes
Possibly a variant of GWYNEDD or a form of Welsh gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It has been common in Wales since the 19th century.
HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה(Hebrew) حنّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə(English) HA-na(German) HAN-nah(Arabic)
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation, unlike the vernacular forms Anne and Ann and the Latin form Anna, which were used from the late Middle Ages. In the last half of the 20th century Hannah surged in popularity and neared the top of the name rankings for both the United States and the United Kingdom.

HARLOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lo
Rating: 34% based on 8 votes
From a surname derived from a place name, itself derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-pər
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
From an Old English surname that originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird.
HAVANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: hə-VAN-ə
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From the name of the capital city of Cuba, which was founded in 1514 by conquistador Diego Velázquez as San Cristóbal de la Habana "Saint Christopher of the HABANA", apparently the name of a local native people. Modern use of the name is probably inspired by the rhyming name SAVANNAH.
HAYDEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-dən
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Rating: 76% based on 8 votes
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HOLLAND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: HAH-lənd(American English)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
From the name of geographic places called Holland, or from surname HOLLAND.

The surname is derived from any of the eight villages named Holland, located in the counties of Essex, Lancaster and Lincoln, England. The name of the villages means "ridge land" in Old English.

The name of the region in the Netherlands is probably from Old Dutch holt lant "wood land" describing the district around Dordrecht.

INDIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: in-dee-AN-ə
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the Indiana Jones series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ιρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 73% based on 9 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL-la(Italian) ee-za-BEH-la(German) iz-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

In the United States this form was much less common than Isabel until the early 1990s, when it began rapidly rising in popularity. It reached a peak in 2009 and 2010, when it was the most popular name for girls in America, an astounding rise over only 20 years.

A famous bearer is the Italian actress Isabella Rossellini (1952-).

ISIDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Serbian, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Исидора(Serbian, Russian) Ισιδωρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ra(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ra(Italian) iz-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
Rating: 76% based on 7 votes
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
JACQUELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHAK-LEEN(French) JAK-ə-lin(English) JAK-wə-lin(English) JAK-ə-leen(English)
Rating: 63% based on 9 votes
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD(English) ZHAD(French)
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JASMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAZ-min(English) ZHAS-MEEN(French)
Rating: 62% based on 9 votes
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived via Arabic from Persian یاسمین (yasamin), which is also a Persian name.
JESSAMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHS-ə-min
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JOCELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAHS-lin(English) JAHS-ə-lin(English) ZHO-SEH-LEHN(French)
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Geats or Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JONQUIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAHNG-kwəl
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
JORDAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JORDANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Јордана(Macedonian)
Pronounced: khor-DHA-na(Spanish) jawr-DAN-ə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of JORDAN.
JULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-YA-na(Dutch) yoo-LYA-na(German) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English) khoo-LYA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 68% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 82% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
KATELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Variant of CAITLIN.
KAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 華也, 佳弥 (Japanese Kanji), かや(Hiragana)
Pronounced: KAY-uh
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
From Japanese 華 (ka) "flower, petal, splendor" combined with 也 (ya) "to be (classical)". Also 佳(ka) "excellent, beautiful, good" combined with 弥 (ya) "all the more, increasingly"

Kaya is also another name of torreya nucifera, the Japanese nutmeg-yew.

KENDALL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-dəl
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
From a surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KERENSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Means "love" in Cornish.
KEZIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LAKEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-kin, lay-KIN
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Elaboration of LAKE.
LAKYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
Variant of LAKEN.
LAUREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 71% based on 9 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, who he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.

Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEIGHTON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was a variant of LAYTON.
LENNOX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LEOCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LILAC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LIE-lək
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
Latinate form of LILLIAN.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 84% based on 9 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LIZETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a(Italian) loo-TSEE-a(German) LOO-tsya(German) LOO-shə(English) loo-SEE-ə(English) luy-SEE-a(Swedish) LOO-chya(Romanian) LOO-kee-a(Classical Latin)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδια(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Rating: 95% based on 8 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
LYNDALL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lin-dil, lin-dal, LYN-dil
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
As far as I know Lyndall was first used as a given name by the South African author, political activist and feminist, Olive Schreiner (1855-1920). Lyndall is the lead character in Schreiner's most famous novel, The story of an African farm. Lyndall is an intelligent, independent, stubborn and beautiful woman facing a patriarchal society. The name was the maiden name of Schreiner's mother, Rebecca Schreiner nee Lyndall.

Allthough relatively uncommon in South African, Lyndall is a familiar girls name. While it is used elsewhere in the world, 15 of the first 20 Lyndall's that come up in an internet search of the name are South Africans. Bearers of the name include South African politician Lyndall Shope-Mafole, South African born British author and academic, Lyndall Gordon, South African model and TV presenter, Lyndall Jarvis and American painter, Lyndall Bass. I had always thought that the name was exclusively feminine but the same internet research revealed Lyndall Fownes Urwick (1891 - 1983). He was a pioneering business management thinker from the United Kingdom.

MADELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of MADELINE.
MADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) MAD-LEEN(French)
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
MADELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Variant of MADELINE.
MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Rating: 76% based on 8 votes
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

MARLOWE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Variant of MEGAN.
MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-dee
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) meaning "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) meaning "to sing".
MEREDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 65% based on 8 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Rating: 65% based on 8 votes
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
NADINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: NA-DEEN(French) na-DEE-nə(German) nay-DEEN(English)
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NAOMI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: nay-O-mee(English) nie-O-mee(English)
Rating: 78% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omi) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).

Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer is the British model Naomi Campbell (1970-).

NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλια(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
NYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: NID-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
OAKLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: OK-lee
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was from various place names meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 72% based on 9 votes
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-pə-leen
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Elaborated form of OPAL.
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 76% based on 8 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEH-NEH-LO-PEH(Classical Greek) pə-NEHL-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 86% based on 10 votes
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and οψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee(English)
Rating: 73% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
QUINN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KWIN(English)
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
RAVENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: rə-VEHN-ə
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
REAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Irish
Pronounced: RAY-gən(English)
Rating: 22% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 84% based on 8 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

RILEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE(French) ro-za-LEE(German) RO-zə-lee(English)
Rating: 75% based on 10 votes
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie Rosalie (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHZ-ə-lind
Rating: 78% based on 8 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy As You Like It (1599).
ROWAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROWENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh (Rare), English (Rare), Cornish (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
Variant of ROWENA.
SABRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SAMANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə(English) sa-MAN-ta(Italian)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show Bewitched.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SAYLOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-lər
Rating: 22% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old French sailleor meaning "acrobat, dancer". As a modern English given name it could also come from the homophone vocabulary word sailor.
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SEQUOIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-KWOI-ə
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHN-ə
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SKYLAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Variant of SKYLER.
SOFIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Σοφια(Greek) София(Russian, Bulgarian) Софія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: zo-FEE-a(German) so-FEE-a(Italian) soo-FEE-u(European Portuguese) so-FEE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) soo-FEE-ə(Catalan) saw-FEE-a(Greek) SO-fee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 96% based on 5 votes
Form of SOPHIA used in various languages.
SONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: SON-yə(English) SAWN-yə(English) SO-nya(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Variant of SONYA.
SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφια(Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə(English) sə-FIE-ə(British English) zo-FEE-a(German)
Rating: 86% based on 10 votes
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels Tom Jones (1749) by Henry Fielding and The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

In the United States this name was only moderately common until the 1990s when it began rising in popularity, eventually becoming the most popular for girls from 2011 to 2013. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə(English) SUYL-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
SYLVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Czech
Pronounced: SEEL-VEE(French) SIL-vi-yeh(Czech)
Rating: 79% based on 9 votes
French and Czech form of SILVIA.
TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-zin
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
TANSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAN-zee
Rating: 47% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
TATIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιανα(Greek) ტატიანა(Georgian) Татьяна(Russian) Татяна(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish, German) TAH-tee-ah-nah(Finnish) ta-TYAHN-ə(English) tu-TYA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TEAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TEE-gən
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 77% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THESSALY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Thessaly is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. This name is borne by Thessaly Lerner, American stage, film and voice actress.
TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian, Belarusian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VESPERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Anglicized)
Pronounced: VES-per-een
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Anglicized variant of VESPÉRINE.
VICTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Rating: 71% based on 8 votes
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), English (Rare), Medieval Italian, Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: vee-EN-ə(Dutch, English, Medieval Italian)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
From the name of the city in Austria (see VIENNE), derived from Roman Vindobona, from Celtic vindo “white” and bona “foundation, fort”. The “white” might be a reference to the river flowing through it. This name was borne by Vienna da Fuscaldo, mother of Saint Francis of Paola.
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 81% based on 8 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIVIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 79% based on 10 votes
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
VIVICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Swedish (Rare), German (Modern, Rare), Danish (Rare)
Pronounced: VIV-ee-kah(English, Swedish)
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Variant of VIVECA. A famous bearer is actress Vivica Fox.
WAVERLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAY-ver-lee
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Transferred use of the surname WAVERLY.
WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: REHN
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 8 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
ZARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZAHR-ə
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Rating: 54% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English) DZO-eh(Italian)
Rating: 67% based on 10 votes
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
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