BuckeyedPeach86's Personal Name List

ABEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: აბელ(Georgian) הֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew) Αβελ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AY-bəl(English) A-BEHL(French) a-BEHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) a-BEW(Brazilian Portuguese)
Popularity: the United States: #146 (down 1)
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-gayl(English) A-bee-giel(German)
Popularity: the United States: #11 (down 1)
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigail refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play The Scornful Lady (1616), which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
ADALYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AD-ə-lin
Popularity: the United States: #108 (up 8)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lynn.
ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан(Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən(English) a-dree-AN(Romanian) A-dryan(Polish) A-dree-an(German) u-dryi-AN(Russian)
Popularity: the United States: #62 (down 4)
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ADRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, English, Dutch
Pronounced: a-dree-A-na(Italian, Dutch) adh-RYA-na(Spanish) a-DRYA-na(Polish) ay-dree-AN-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #240 (down 17)
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַדְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Popularity: the United States: #229 (up 23)
Means "flock of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a man who married Saul's daughter Merab.
AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #242 (down 21)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AINSLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AYNZ-lee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #399 (down 47)
From a surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Popularity: the United States: #11 (up 2)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Popularity: the United States: #125 (down 5)
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Swedish
Pronounced: a-LEE-thya(European Spanish) a-LEE-sya(Latin American Spanish) ə-LEE-shə(English) ə-LEE-see-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #391 (down 32)
Latinized form of ALICE.
ALISON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AL-i-sən(English) A-LEE-SAWN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #400 (down 17)
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE) [1]. It was common in England, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in England in the 20th century via Scotland. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
ALONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַלוֹנָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of ALON (1).
AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər(English) AHM-bər(Dutch)
Popularity: the United States: #471 (down 69)
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian, Polish) ah-MAY-lee-ah(Dutch) a-MEH-lee-a(German)
Popularity: the United States: #8 (no change)
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo(English)
Popularity: the United States: #43 (down 3)
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANGELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: an-JEHL-ee-ə
Elaborated form of ANGELA.
ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: an-JEHL-i-kə(English) an-JEH-lee-ka(Italian)
Popularity: the United States: #546 (down 6)
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their Orlando poems (1483 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Popularity: the United States: #54 (down 1)
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: an-na-BEHL-la(Italian) an-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #591 (down 124)
Latinate form of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLA.
ANNIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHN-nee-kah(Swedish, Dutch, Finnish) A-nee-ka(German) AN-i-kə(English) AHN-i-kə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #721 (down 16)
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ANSELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AN-zelm(German) AN-selm(English)
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee(American English) AN-tə-nee(British English)
Popularity: the United States: #38 (down 5)
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Popularity: the United States: #174 (down 16)
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARAMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #928 (down 152)
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) meaning "most" and αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: a-RYAN-na(Italian) ar-ee-AN-ə(English) ar-ee-AHN-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #95 (down 8)
Italian form of ARIADNE.
ASA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָסָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-sə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #508 (down 18)
Possibly means "healer" in Hebrew. This name was borne by the third king of Judah, as told in the Old Testament.
ASHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ASH-ər(English)
Popularity: the United States: #47 (up 12)
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
ASPEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
Popularity: the United States: #269 (up 60)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
AUBERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-bər-ahn
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.
AUDRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWD-rə
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUGUST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
Popularity: the United States: #170 (up 21)
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS. This was the name of three Polish kings.
AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Classical Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Popularity: the United States: #44 (up 7)
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AUSTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWS-tin
Popularity: the United States: #80 (down 5)
Medieval contracted form of AUGUSTINE (1). Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Popularity: the United States: #3 (no change)
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
AVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century [1].
AVERY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Popularity: the United States: #16 (down 2)
From a surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AVIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Popularity: the United States: #402 (up 76)
Variant of AVIANA.
AZALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə
Popularity: the United States: #510 (up 66)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) meaning "dry".
AZRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲזְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "my help is God", derived from Hebrew עָזַר ('azar) meaning "help" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". This was the name of three minor characters in the Old Testament.
AZURE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AZH-ər
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BECKETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BEHK-it
Popularity: the United States: #227 (down 1)
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEHN-jə-min(English) BEHN-ZHA-MEHN(French) BEHN-ya-meen(German)
Popularity: the United States: #6 (no change)
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BLAIR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BLEHR(English)
Popularity: the United States: #432 (up 79)
From a Scottish surname that is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BRADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: BRAY-dee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #260 (down 34)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Popularity: the United States: #687 (up 33)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRITTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIT-ən
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROOKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Popularity: the United States: #201 (down 10)
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWKS
Popularity: the United States: #161 (up 43)
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BRYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIN
Popularity: the United States: #305 (down 10)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Popularity: the United States: #45 (up 5)
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə
Variant of CALISTA.
CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Popularity: the United States: #143 (up 3)
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
CAMDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAM-dən
Popularity: the United States: #152 (down 4)
From a surname that was derived from a place name, perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAMELLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-i-ə, kə-MEHL-i-ə
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CARMEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #432 (down 23)
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
CAROLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #424 (up 16)
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Popularity: the United States: #55 (no change)
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CARTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-tər
Popularity: the United States: #24 (no change)
From an English surname that meant "one who uses a cart". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Jimmy Carter (1924-).
CASSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə(English) kə-SAHN-drə(English) kas-SAN-dra(Italian) ka-SAN-dra(German)
Popularity: the United States: #661 (down 55)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Popularity: the United States: #155 (up 13)
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CELESTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Popularity: the United States: #441 (up 23)
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CELESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHL-ə-steen
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CHANTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAHN-TAL(French) shahn-TAHL(English, Dutch) shahn-TAL(English)
From a French surname that was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Χαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAYR-is(English)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kə-RIS-ə
Elaborated form of CHARIS. Edmund Spencer used it in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Popularity: the United States: #6 (up 1)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλοη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #25 (down 3)
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHRISTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS-chən(English) KRISH-chən(English) KREES-TYAHN(French) KRIS-tyan(German) KRIS-ti-an(Swedish, Norwegian) KREHS-dyan(Danish)
Popularity: the United States: #55 (down 3)
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as The Ugly Duckling and The Emperor's New Clothes.
CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Popularity: the United States: #49 (no change)
French form of CLARA.
CLARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian
Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #742 (down 64)
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Classical Latin)
Popularity: the United States: #872 (down 39)
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CONNOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Popularity: the United States: #57 (down 1)
Variant of CONOR.
COOPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOO-pər
Popularity: the United States: #83 (up 5)
From a surname meaning "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
CORBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
Popularity: the United States: #277 (down 19)
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-) [1].
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORINNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοριννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ko-RI-na(German) kə-REEN-ə(English) kə-RIN-ə(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) meaning "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book Amores. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem Corinna's going a-Maying.
CORINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAW-REEN(French) kə-REEN(English) kə-RIN(English)
Popularity: the United States: #794 (up 35)
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel Corinne (1807).
CRYSTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-təl
Popularity: the United States: #717 (down 73)
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Popularity: the United States: #410 (down 17)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-zee
Popularity: the United States: #169 (up 1)
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DAKOTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Popularity: the United States: #247 (down 15)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DALLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAL-əs
Popularity: the United States: #287 (down 27)
From a surname that could either be of Old English origin meaning "valley house" or of Scottish Gaelic origin meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George M. Dallas (1792-1864).
DAMARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Δαμαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAM-ə-ris(English)
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δαμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
DANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Popularity: the United States: #15 (no change)
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DASHIELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
DAWSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAW-sən
Popularity: the United States: #194 (up 2)
From a surname meaning "son of DAVID". This name was popularized in the late 1990s by the television drama Dawson's Creek.
DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DIR-drə(English) DIR-dree(English) DYEHR-dryə(Irish)
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from Old Irish der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' Deirdre (1907) and J. M. Synge's Deirdre of the Sorrows (1910).

DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #94 (up 8)
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
DESMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEHZ-mənd(English)
Popularity: the United States: #323 (up 2)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DEVIN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHV-in
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DINAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דִּינָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: DIE-nə(English)
Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English given name since after the Protestant Reformation.
DORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #521 (up 16)
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUNG-kən
Popularity: the United States: #917 (down 53)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play Macbeth (1606).
DYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an(Welsh) DIL-ən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #31 (down 2)
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series Beverly Hills 90210.

EASTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EES-tən
Popularity: the United States: #66 (no change)
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Popularity: the United States: #32 (up 3)
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEANORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehl-ə-NAWR-ə
Latinate form of ELEANOR.
ELIANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English (Modern)
Pronounced: eh-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Popularity: the United States: #83 (up 5)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.
ELIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #7 (up 1)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Popularity: the United States: #13 (no change)
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLIOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Popularity: the United States: #168 (down 8)
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.
ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Popularity: the United States: #167 (up 23)
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-bər
Popularity: the United States: #209 (up 80)
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
EMERY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Popularity: the United States: #92 (up 23)
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #58 (up 17)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish)
Popularity: the United States: #1 (no change)
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem Henry and Emma (1709) [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Popularity: the United States: #783 (down 30)
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
ESMEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: EHZ-may(English) EHZ-mee(English) ehs-MEH(Dutch)
Feminine form of ESMÉ.
ESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Εσθηρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Popularity: the United States: #153 (up 12)
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

ETHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən(English) EH-TAN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #12 (up 2)
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευαδνη(Ancient Greek)
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), from ευ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVANDER (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər, ə-VAN-dər
Anglicized form of IOMHAR.
EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Popularity: the United States: #277 (down 10)
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem Evangeline (1847) [1]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Greek
Other Scripts: Εβελινα(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-veh-LEE-na(Italian, Swedish)
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel Evelina (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name EVELYN or an elaboration of EVE.
EVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: EHV-ə-leen(English) EHV-ə-lien(English) EHV-LEEN(French) eh-və-LEE-nə(Dutch) eh-və-LEEN(Dutch)
Variant of EVELINA.
EVELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
Popularity: the United States: #10 (down 1)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EVERETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Popularity: the United States: #95 (up 10)
From a surname that was derived from the given name EVERARD.
EZRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #59 (up 10)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
FABIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, English
Pronounced: FA-byan(German, Polish) FA-bee-ahn(Dutch) FAY-bee-ən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #390 (down 2)
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Classical Latin)
Popularity: the United States: #231 (up 13)
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FLETCHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLECH-ər
Popularity: the United States: #608 (up 23)
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(German, Spanish) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Popularity: the United States: #266 (up 39)
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Classical Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Popularity: the United States: #35 (down 4)
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GABRIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ga-bree-EHL-la(Italian) GAWB-ree-ehl-law(Hungarian) ga-bree-EHL-ə(English) gah-bree-EHL-lah(Swedish)
Popularity: the United States: #70 (down 4)
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) gab-ree-EHL(English)
Popularity: the United States: #305 (down 42)
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GARRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-it, GEHR-it
Popularity: the United States: #328 (down 7)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GARRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ik
From a surname that was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in(English)
Popularity: the United States: #111 (down 15)
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Popularity: the United States: #229 (up 28)
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jawr-jee-AN-ə(English)
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
GEORGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Spanish, Dutch, Hungarian
Pronounced: jawr-JEE-nə(English) kheh-or-KHEE-na(Spanish)
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GERARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Pronounced: ji-RAHRD(American English) JEHR-əd(British English) GHEH-rahrt(Dutch) zhə-RART(Catalan) GEH-rart(Polish)
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with hard meaning "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald [1], with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GRAYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Popularity: the United States: #32 (up 2)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GUNNER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Popularity: the United States: #281 (down 19)
English variant of GUNNAR, influenced by the vocabulary word gunner.
HADASSAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַסָּה(Hebrew)
Popularity: the United States: #730 (down 7)
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
HADLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAD-lee
Popularity: the United States: #104 (up 8)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה(Hebrew) حنّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə(English) HA-na(German) HAN-nah(Arabic)
Popularity: the United States: #33 (down 1)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation, unlike the vernacular forms Anne and Ann and the Latin form Anna, which were used from the late Middle Ages. In the last half of the 20th century Hannah surged in popularity and neared the top of the name rankings for both the United States and the United Kingdom.

HARLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lən
Popularity: the United States: #746 (up 41)
From a surname that was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lo
Popularity: the United States: #366 (up 24)
From a surname derived from a place name, itself derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-pər
Popularity: the United States: #9 (up 2)
From an Old English surname that originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird.
HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Popularity: the United States: #42 (up 1)
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #458 (up 58)
Latinate form of HELEN.
HENRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHN-ree
Popularity: the United States: #16 (up 2)
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was usually rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the later Middle Ages it was fairly popular, and was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947), and American actor Henry Fonda (1905-1982).

HOLDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HOL-dən
Popularity: the United States: #216 (up 26)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951), Holden Caufield.
HUDSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUD-sən
Popularity: the United States: #54 (up 10)
From an English surname meaning "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
HUNTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUN-tər
Popularity: the United States: #56 (down 3)
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #78 (down 2)
Scottish form of JOHN.
INDIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: in-dee-AN-ə
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the Indiana Jones series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ιρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Popularity: the United States: #138 (up 10)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English)
Popularity: the United States: #34 (down 2)
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL-la(Italian) ee-za-BEH-la(German) iz-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #4 (no change)
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

In the United States this form was much less common than Isabel until the early 1990s, when it began rapidly rising in popularity. It reached a peak in 2009 and 2010, when it was the most popular name for girls in America, an astounding rise over only 20 years.

A famous bearer is the Italian actress Isabella Rossellini (1952-).

JACKSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-sən
Popularity: the United States: #17 (up 3)
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
JACOB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Popularity: the United States: #13 (down 3)
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

JACQUELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHAK-LEEN(French) JAK-ə-lin(English) JAK-wə-lin(English) JAK-ə-leen(English)
Popularity: the United States: #339 (up 10)
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD(English) ZHAD(French)
Popularity: the United States: #111 (down 1)
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Popularity: the United States: #154 (up 30)
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JESSAMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHS-ə-min
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JESSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
Popularity: the United States: #185 (up 1)
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JOCELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAHS-lin(English) JAHS-ə-lin(English) ZHO-SEH-LEHN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #194 (down 31)
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Geats or Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JORDAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #375 (down 19)
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JORDANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Јордана(Macedonian)
Pronounced: khor-DHA-na(Spanish) jawr-DAN-ə(English)
Feminine form of JORDAN.
JOSHUA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHSH-oo-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #41 (down 2)
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Popularity: the United States: #36 (no change)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-YA-na(Dutch) yoo-LYA-na(German) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English) khoo-LYA-na(Spanish)
Popularity: the United States: #151 (down 4)
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Popularity: the United States: #242 (down 15)
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Popularity: the United States: #281 (up 31)
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUSTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Slovene
Pronounced: JUS-tin(English) ZHUYS-TEHN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #141 (down 14)
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).
JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN(French) jus-TEEN(English)
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel Justine (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb
Popularity: the United States: #207 (down 22)
English variant of CALEB.
KATELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Popularity: the United States: #500 (down 85)
Variant of CAITLIN.
KATHERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German
Pronounced: kath-ə-REE-nə(English) kə-THREE-nə(English) ka-teh-REE-na(German)
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play Taming of the Shrew (1593).
KEEGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEE-gən
Popularity: the United States: #351 (down 42)
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KELLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEHL-ən
Popularity: the United States: #617 (down 64)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN.
KENDALL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-dəl
Popularity: the United States: #271 (down 47)
From a surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KERENSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Means "love" in Cornish.
KETURAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə(English) ki-TYOOR-ə(English)
Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.
KEZIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KIERAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEER-ən(English) KEER-awn(English)
Popularity: the United States: #496 (up 15)
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Popularity: the United States: #124 (down 10)
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #686 (up 9)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.
LANDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAN-dən
Popularity: the United States: #61 (down 4)
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
LAUREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Popularity: the United States: #170 (down 22)
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LAYTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
Popularity: the United States: #658 (up 69)
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of English towns meaning "town with a leek garden" in Old English.
LEIGHTON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
Popularity: the United States: #448 (up 20)
From a surname that was a variant of LAYTON.
LENNOX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
Popularity: the United States: #650 (up 14)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LEOCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LEVI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: לֵוִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-vie(English) LEH:-vee(Dutch)
Popularity: the United States: #33 (up 4)
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
LILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #109 (no change)
Latinate form of LILLIAN.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Popularity: the United States: #31 (up 2)
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINCOLN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LING-kən
Popularity: the United States: #40 (up 1)
From a surname that was originally from the name of a city in England, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
LINDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-dən
From a German surname that was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINNAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NAY-ə, li-NEE-ə
From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see LINNÉA).
LOGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #10 (down 5)
From a surname that was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Popularity: the United States: #472 (down 11)
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Popularity: the United States: #732 (up 18)
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Classical Latin)
Popularity: the United States: #8 (up 3)
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE), as well as the form used in several other languages.
LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a(Italian) loo-TSEE-a(German) LOO-tsya(German) LOO-shə(English) loo-SEE-ə(English) luy-SEE-a(Swedish) LOO-chya(Romanian) LOO-kee-a(Classical Latin)
Popularity: the United States: #183 (up 2)
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan(Romanian) LOO-shən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #650 (down 71)
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.
LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδια(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Popularity: the United States: #89 (down 4)
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #680 (up 41)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
MADDOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAD-əks
Popularity: the United States: #140 (down 4)
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
MADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) MAD-LEEN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #100 (down 1)
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
MARCUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MAR-koos(Classical Latin) MAHR-kəs(English) MAR-kuys(Swedish)
Popularity: the United States: #209 (down 14)
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Popularity: the United States: #127 (up 5)
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

MARLOWE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Popularity: the United States: #0 (down 17)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
MATTHEW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MATH-yoo(English)
Popularity: the United States: #20 (down 4)
English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of YAHWEH", from the roots מַתָּן (mattan) meaning "gift" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first gospel in the New Testament. He is considered a saint in many Christian traditions. The variant Matthias also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a separate apostle. The name appears in the Old Testament as Mattithiah.

As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was the American naval officer Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858), who led a delegation to Japan. A famous modern bearer is American actor Matthew McConaughey (1969-).

MATTHIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ματθιας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ma-TEE-as(German) maht-TEE-ahs(Swedish) MA-TYAS(French) mə-THIE-əs(English) MAT-tee-as(Classical Latin)
Popularity: the United States: #407 (up 55)
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW), which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən
Popularity: the United States: #703 (up 298)
Variant of MEGAN.
MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-dee
Popularity: the United States: #137 (up 6)
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) meaning "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) meaning "to sing".
MEREDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Popularity: the United States: #523 (down 26)
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHR-ik
Popularity: the United States: #815 (up 10)
From a surname that was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.
MICAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #103 (up 4)
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICAIAH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מִיכָיְהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mie-KAY-ə(English) mi-KIE-ə(English)
Means "who is like YAHWEH?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament belonging to both males and females.
MICHAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak, Greek
Other Scripts: Μιχαελα(Greek)
Pronounced: mi-kha-EH-la(German) mi-KAY-lə(English) MI-kha-eh-la(Czech) MEE-kha-eh-la(Slovak)
Popularity: the United States: #528 (down 12)
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIRIAM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) mee-RYAM(Spanish) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Popularity: the United States: #302 (down 18)
Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Popularity: the United States: #158 (up 8)
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MONTGOMERY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mənt-GUM-ə-ree, mənt-GUM-ree
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Popularity: the United States: #393 (up 7)
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
NADINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: NA-DEEN(French) na-DEE-nə(German) nay-DEEN(English)
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NAOMI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: nay-O-mee(English) nie-O-mee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #64 (up 5)
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omi) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).

Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer is the British model Naomi Campbell (1970-).

NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλια(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #114 (up 5)
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: נָתָן(Hebrew) Ναθαν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NAY-thən(English) NA-TAHN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #48 (down 3)
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.

It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Nathan Hale (1755-1776), an American spy executed by the British during the American Revolution.

NATHANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: נְתַנְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: nə-THAN-yəl(English)
Popularity: the United States: #116 (down 4)
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of The Scarlet Letter, was a famous bearer of this name.
NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Popularity: the United States: #74 (down 6)
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νικη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαος (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NICOLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Pronounced: NI-ko-la(German) NIK-ə-lə(English)
Feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NOAH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: נֹחַ, נוֹחַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-ə(English) NO-a(German)
Popularity: the United States: #2 (no change)
From the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, repose", derived from the root נוּחַ (nuach). According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the Great Flood. After the flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans. In the United States it quickly increased in popularity beginning in the 1990s, eventually becoming the most popular name for boys between 2013 and 2016.

A famous bearer was the American lexicographer Noah Webster (1758-1843).

NOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #64 (up 3)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Popularity: the United States: #56 (up 39)
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
OAKLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: OK-lee
Popularity: the United States: #388 (up 86)
From an English surname that was from various place names meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Popularity: the United States: #2 (no change)
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
Popularity: the United States: #819 (up 25)
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-pə-leen
Elaborated form of OPAL.
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #373 (up 43)
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
OREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֹרֶן(Hebrew)
Means "pine tree" in Hebrew.
OSCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər(English) AWS-kar(Italian, Swedish) AWS-KAR(French)
Popularity: the United States: #206 (down 14)
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson [1]. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in(English)
Popularity: the United States: #25 (up 3)
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
PARKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHR-kər
Popularity: the United States: #96 (down 6)
From an English occupational surname that meant "keeper of the park".
PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEH-NEH-LO-PEH(Classical Greek) pə-NEHL-ə-pee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #26 (down 2)
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and οψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PEONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEE-ə-nee
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PEH-tra(German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak) PEH-traw(Hungarian) PEHT-rah(Finnish) PEHT-rə(English)
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #320 (down 2)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PRESTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PREHS-tən
Popularity: the United States: #205 (down 16)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
PRISCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: PRIS-kə(English)
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name meaning "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.
PRISCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə(English) preesh-SHEEL-la(Italian)
Popularity: the United States: #574 (down 48)
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858).
REAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Irish
Pronounced: RAY-gən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #107 (down 9)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

RILEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Popularity: the United States: #28 (down 3)
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
RODERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish, Welsh
Pronounced: RAHD-ə-rik(English) RAHD-rik(English)
Means "famous ruler" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem The Vision of Don Roderick (1811).
ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAW-man(Polish, Slovak) RO-man(Czech, German) RO-mən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #85 (up 6)
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
RONAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, Irish, French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-nən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #294 (up 2)
Breton and Anglicized form of RÓNÁN.
ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE(French) ro-za-LEE(German) RO-zə-lee(English)
Popularity: the United States: #208 (up 27)
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie Rosalie (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHZ-ə-lind
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy As You Like It (1599).
ROWAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #211 (up 1)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Popularity: the United States: #74 (up 4)
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUPERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: ROO-pehrt(German) RUY-pərt(Dutch) ROO-pərt(English)
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
SABRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Popularity: the United States: #427 (up 6)
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SAGE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Popularity: the United States: #307 (up 3)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SALOME
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: სალომე(Georgian) Σαλωμη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-LO-mee(English)
From an Aramaic name that was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.

As a Christian given name, Salome has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation. This was due to a second person of this name in the New Testament: one of the women who witnessed the crucifixion and later discovered that Jesus' tomb was empty. It is used in Georgia due to the 4th-century Salome of Ujarma, who is considered a saint in the Georgian Church.

SAMANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə(English) sa-MAN-ta(Italian)
Popularity: the United States: #60 (down 6)
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show Bewitched.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Popularity: the United States: #45 (down 7)
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SAYLOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-lər
Popularity: the United States: #362 (up 67)
From an English surname that was derived from Old French sailleor meaning "acrobat, dancer". As a modern English given name it could also come from the homophone vocabulary word sailor.
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Popularity: the United States: #20 (down 2)
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Popularity: the United States: #18 (up 5)
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SEQUOIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-KWOI-ə
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
SHAWN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAWN
Popularity: the United States: #393 (down 6)
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHN-ə
Popularity: the United States: #186 (up 36)
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σιλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Popularity: the United States: #110 (up 10)
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Popularity: the United States: #416 (up 7)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SKYLAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Popularity: the United States: #50 (down 2)
Variant of SKYLER.
SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφια(Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə(English) sə-FIE-ə(British English) zo-FEE-a(German)
Popularity: the United States: #5 (no change)
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels Tom Jones (1749) by Henry Fielding and The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

In the United States this name was only moderately common until the 1990s when it began rising in popularity, eventually becoming the most popular for girls from 2011 to 2013. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

SPENCER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEHN-sər
Popularity: the United States: #307 (down 15)
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #38 (up 4)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Popularity: the United States: #409 (up 24)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə(English) SUYL-vee-ah(Finnish)
Popularity: the United States: #490 (down 8)
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TALON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAL-ən
Popularity: the United States: #748 (up 4)
From the English word meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".
TANSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAN-zee
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
TATIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιανα(Greek) ტატიანა(Georgian) Татьяна(Russian) Татяна(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish, German) TAH-tee-ah-nah(Finnish) ta-TYAHN-ə(English) tu-TYA-nə(Russian)
Popularity: the United States: #696 (up 4)
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TEAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TEE-gən
Popularity: the United States: #177 (down 2)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEODORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Popularity: the United States: #44 (up 17)
From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) meaning "god" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən(English) TREES-TAHN(French)
Popularity: the United States: #123 (down 2)
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Popularity: the United States: #357 (up 20)
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VICTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Popularity: the United States: #21 (down 2)
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-yo-la(Czech)
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Popularity: the United States: #43 (up 4)
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIVIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən(English)
Popularity: the United States: #95 (up 2)
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
WALKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWK-ər
Popularity: the United States: #266 (up 48)
From an English surname that referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it. The word ultimately derives from Old English wealcan "to walk".
WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS-lee, WEHZ-lee
Popularity: the United States: #105 (up 6)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: REHN
Popularity: the United States: #468 (down 3)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
WYATT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
Popularity: the United States: #26 (down 1)
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
ZACHARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree(English)
Popularity: the United States: #109 (down 6)
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English) DZO-eh(Italian)
Popularity: the United States: #40 (up 1)
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
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