RoseTintsMyWorld's Personal Name List

AARON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן(Hebrew) Ἀαρών(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ən(English) AR-ən(English)
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon), which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.

As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by the American politician Aaron Burr (1756-1836), notable for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel.

ABENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Means "we asked for her, and behold, we got her" in Yoruba.
ABIGAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀβιγαία(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of ABIGAIL.
ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-gayl(English)
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigail refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play The Scornful Lady (1616), which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ABISAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Latin
Biblical Latin form of ABISHAI.
ABSALOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְשָׁלוֹם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-sə-ləm(English)
From the Hebrew name אַבְשָׁלוֹם ('Avshalom) meaning "my father is peace", derived from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". In the Old Testament he is a son of King David. He avenged his sister Tamar by arranging the murder of her rapist, their half-brother Amnon. He later led a revolt against his father. While fleeing on the back of a mule he got his head caught in a tree and was killed by Joab.
ACANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἄκανθα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-KAN-thə(English)
Latinized form of Greek Ἄκανθα (Akantha), which meant "thorn, prickle". In Greek legend she was a nymph loved by Apollo.
ADARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַדָרָה(Hebrew)
Means "noble" in Hebrew.
ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADHARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.
ADRASTEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀδράστεια(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of ADRASTOS. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.
ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан(Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən(English) a-dree-AN(Romanian) A-dryan(Polish) A-dree-an(German) u-dryi-AN(Russian)
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ADRIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: A-DREE-YEHN(French)
French feminine form of ADRIAN.
AERON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived either from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of the River Aeron in Wales.
AETHRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αιθρα, Αἴθρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-thrə
Latinized form of Greek Αιθρη (Aithre) meaning "bright, purer air; the sky" in Greek (from aithein "to burn, shine"). This was the name of several characters in Greek myth including the mother of THESEUS, a captive of Troy, at the service of HELEN until the city was besieged.
AIDAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Айдай(Kazakh)
Means "moon child" in Kazakh.
AIKATERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αἰκατερίνη(Ancient Greek)
Ancient Greek form of KATHERINE.
AINA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛菜, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-NA
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
AINDRÉAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AHN-dray-as
Irish form of ANDREW.
AIOLOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αἴολος(Ancient Greek)
Means "quick-moving, nimble" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of the winds.
AIRELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare), Literature
Derived from airelle, the French name for the plant genus Vaccinium. The French derived the name from Portuguese airella, which in turn was derived from Latin atra "dark, black, gloomy".
AIRI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛莉, 愛梨, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-REE
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AISLING
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish Gaelic. This name was created in the 20th century.
AKAMORI
Usage: Japanese (Rare)
Other Scripts: 赤森(Japanese Kanji) あかもり(Japanese Hiragana) アカモリ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: A-KA-MO-RYEE
From 赤 (aka) meaning "red" combined with 森 (mori) meaning "forest."

This surname is rarely used.

AKANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KA-NEH
From Japanese (akane) meaning "deep red, dye from the rubia plant". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
AKIRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 昭, 明, 亮, 晶, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KYEE-RA
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
ALARIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
ALASTRÍONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: al-as-TREE-na
Feminine form of ALASTAR.
ALAZNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: a-LAS-neh
Means "miracle" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Milagros.
ALBUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
ALDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AL-DREEK(French)
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, mighty". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
ALEC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ik
Short form of ALEXANDER.
ALECTO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀληκτώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-LEHK-to(English)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀληκτώ (Alekto), which was derived from ἄληκτος (alektos) meaning "unceasing". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology.
ALEJANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-leh-KHAN-dro
Spanish form of ALEXANDER. This was the most popular name for boys in Spain from the 1990s until 2006 (and again in 2011).
ALESSANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-lehs-SAN-dro
Italian form of ALEXANDER. A famous bearer was Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), the Italian physicist who invented the battery.
ALFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-frəd(English) AL-FREHD(French) AL-freht(German, Polish) AHL-frət(Dutch)
Means "elf counsel", derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.

Famous bearers include the British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892), the Swedish inventor and Nobel Prize founder Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), and the British-American film director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980).

ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) a-LEE-sə(German) A-li-tseh(Czech)
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

ALIZARIN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ə-LIZ-ə-rin
From alizarin crimson, the English name of a shade of red. The color is named after a red dye originally obtained from the root of the madder plant, ultimately from Arabic al-usara meaning "the juice". This was used for a male character in the romance novel 'Pandora' by Jilly Cooper.
ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
ALOUETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Popular Culture
Pronounced: ah-loo-ET(English)
From the French word for skylark, a small bird. It is also the name of a popular French Canadian children's song about plucking the feathers off a skylark.
ALTAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
ALVAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
AMAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Means "the end" in Basque. This is the name of a character in the historical novel Amaya, or the Basques in the 8th century (1879) by Francisco Navarro-Villoslada (Amaya in the Spanish original; Amaia in the Basque translation).
AMANI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أماني(Arabic)
Pronounced: a-MA-nee
Means "wishes" in Arabic.
AMARANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
AMARANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Ἀμάραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
AMARYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: am-ə-RIL-is(English)
Derived from Greek ἀμαρύσσω (amarysso) meaning "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem Eclogues [1]. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
AMATERASU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese Mythology
Other Scripts: 天照(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-MA-TEH-RA-SOO(Japanese)
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. She was born when Izanagi washed his left eye after returning from the underworld. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀμβρόσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMBROSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: am-BRO-zeen
Feminine form of AMBROSE.
AMICHAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַמִיחַי(Hebrew)
Means "my people are alive" in Hebrew.
ANAHERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Means "angel" in Maori.
ANDRASTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἀνδράστη(Ancient Greek)
Possibly means "invincible" in Celtic. According to the Greco-Roman historian Cassius Dio [1], this was the name of a Briton goddess of victory who was invoked by Boudicca before her revolt.
ANDROMACHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομάχη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MA-KEH(Classical Greek)
Derived from the Greek elements ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle". In Greek legend she was the wife of the Trojan hero Hector. After the fall of Troy Neoptolemus killed her son Astyanax and took her as a concubine.
ANDROMEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομέδα, Ἀνδρομέδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ANG-jeh-lo
Italian form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANGERONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: an-geh-RO-na(Latin) an-jə-RO-nə(English)
Possibly from Latin angor "strangulation, torment" or angustus "narrow, constricted". Angerona was the Roman goddess of the winter solstice, death, and silence.
ANJALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Nepali
Other Scripts: अञ्जली, अंजली(Hindi) अंजली(Marathi, Nepali) அஞ்சலி(Tamil) అంజలి(Telugu) അഞ്ജലി(Malayalam)
Means "salutation" in Sanskrit.
ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee(American English) AN-tə-nee(British English)
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ANTONIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: an-TO-nyo(Spanish, Italian)
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). This has been a common name in Italy since the 14th century. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys in the 1950s and 60s.

A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in The Merchant of Venice (1596) by William Shakespeare.

ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable, yielding to prayer".
ARACELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARACHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀράχνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-RA-KNEH(Classical Greek) ə-RAK-nee(English)
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
ARAMIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
The surname of one of the musketeers in The Three Musketeers (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on the 17th-century Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits (itself from Basque aran meaning "valley").
ARCANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Means "archangel" in Italian.
ARELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: אראלה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ar-EL-ə(English)
ARI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲרִי(Hebrew)
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀριάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" and ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: ə-RIS-tə(English)
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
ARISTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρίστων(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "the best".
ARKADI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ARTEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἄρτεμις(Ancient Greek) Άρτεμις(Greek)
Pronounced: AR-TEH-MEES(Classical Greek) AHR-tə-mis(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
ARTHUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius [1]). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth [2]. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ARUZHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Аружан(Kazakh)
Means "beautiful soul" in Kazakh.
ASHA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Other Scripts: आशा(Hindi, Marathi) ಆಶಾ(Kannada) ആശാ(Malayalam)
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
ASHERAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of a Semitic mother goddess. She was worshipped by the Israelites before the advent of monotheism.
ASHTORETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: עַשְׁתֹרֶת(Ancient Hebrew)
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess ISHTAR.
ASIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: a-SEE-ehr
Means "the beginning", from Basque hasi.
ASLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Other Scripts: Аслан(Kazakh, Chechen, Ossetian) Аслъан(Western Circassian) Аслъэн(Eastern Circassian)
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
ASTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: as-TOR-ee-a(American English)
Feminine form of ASTOR.
ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀστραία(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀστραία (Astraia), derived from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
ASTROPHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star" and φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella.
ATARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲטָרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AT-ə-rə(English)
Means "crown" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Atarah is a minor character, the wife of Jerahmeel.
ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ἀθηνᾶ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
AUDRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Means "storm" in Lithuanian.
AURORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RAWR
French form of AURORA.
AUŠRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Means "dawn" in Lithuanian.
AUSTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian, Baltic Mythology
Derived from Latvian austra "aurora", this is the name of the Latvian personification (sometimes goddess) of the dawn and light who acts as a messenger of the sun.
AVANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Other Scripts: अवनी(Marathi) અવની(Gujarati)
Means "earth" in Sanskrit.
AVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century [1].
AYELET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיֶלֶת(Hebrew)
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
AZAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: آذر(Persian)
Means "fire" in Persian.
AZRAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Variant of AZRIEL. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
AZUCENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-thoo-THEH-na(European Spanish) a-soo-SEH-na(Latin American Spanish)
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
AZULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, Spanish (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ah-ZOO-luh
Fictional name meant to be derived from Portuguese, Galician, and Spanish azul meaning "blue" (of Persian origin). This is the name of a main antagonist in the television series 'Avatar: The Last Airbender'.
AZURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-ZHUWR-ə, AZH-rə
Elaboration of AZURE.
BARNABAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare), English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Βαρναβᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: BAR-na-bas(German) BAHR-nə-bəs(English)
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic form is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement".

As an English name, Barnabas came into occasional use after the 12th century. It is now rare, though the variant Barnaby is still moderately common in Britain.

BASTET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology
Pronounced: BAHS-teht(English)
From Egyptian bꜣstjt, a variant of BAST. This form of the name, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
BELLADONNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Medieval Italian
From Italian bella "beautiful, fair" and donna "lady". This is the name of an extremely poisonous plant (Atropa belladonna; also bears the popular name of deadly nightshade). The author J. R. R. Tolkien used it as a hobbit name in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954), where it belongs to the mother of Bilbo Baggins.
BELLATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
BEOWULF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Pronounced: BAY-ə-wuwlf(English)
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BERENICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Βερενίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: bər-NEES(English) behr-ə-NIE-see(English) behr-ə-NEE-see(English) beh-reh-NEE-cheh(Italian)
Latinized form of Βερενίκη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενίκη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φέρω (phero) meaning "to bring" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty that was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BEREZI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: beh-REH-see
Means "special" in Basque.
BEVERLY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHV-ər-lee
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark [1].
BITHIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּתְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: bi-THIE-ə(English)
Means "daughter of YAHWEH" in Hebrew, from the roots בַּת (bat) meaning "daughter" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of a daughter of Pharaoh. She is traditionally equated with the pharaoh's daughter who drew Moses from the Nile.
BLÁINN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
From Old Norse blár meaning "blue, dark, black".
BLANCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BLAHNSH(French) BLANCH(English)
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BRAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN(Irish)
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRENNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREHN-ən(English)
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Yiddish (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: ברײַנא(Yiddish)
Pronounced: brin-ah(English) bry-na(Yiddish)
Yiddish ברײַנא from German Bräune "brown(ness)".
CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KEHR-ə, KAR-ə
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: KAHR-is
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.
CASPIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən(English)
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
CATHAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KA-hir
Possibly means "battle man" from Irish cath "battle" and fer "man".
CATO (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.
CATRIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: ka-TREE-na, ka-TREE-o-na
Gaelic form of KATHERINE.
CATTLEYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern)
Pronounced: kat-LEE-ə(American English) KAT-lee-ə(American English)
From the name of a tropical American orchid (genus Cattleya) with purple, pink or white flowers, which was named after William CATTLEY (1788-1835).
CHANTREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer
Other Scripts: ចន្ទ្រា(Khmer)
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
CHARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ(English) SHARL(French)
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as Great Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities, French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the Peanuts comic strip.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

CHARNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: טשאַרנאַ(Yiddish)
From a Slavic word meaning "black".
CHARON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χάρων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KEHR-ən(English)
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
CHRYSANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χρυσάνθη(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CITRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: sit-REEN(English) SIT-reen(English) SIT-REEN(French)
From the English word for a pale yellow variety of quartz that resembles topaz. From Old French citrin, ultimately from Latin citrus, "citron tree". It is one of the birthstones for November.
CLEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλέων(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Κλέων (Kleon), a Greek name derived from κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory".
COLUMBIA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian
Pronounced: cə-LUM-bee-ə(Spanish, Italian) Col-LUM-bee-ah(English)
The name Colombia comes from the name of Christopher Columbus (Spanish: Cristóbal Colón). It was conceived by the revolutionary Francisco de Miranda as a reference to all the New World, but especially to those territories and colonies under Spanish and Portuguese rule. The name was later adopted by the Republic of Colombia of 1819, formed out of the territories of the old Viceroyalty of New Granada (modern day Colombia, Panama, Venezuela and Ecuador).
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Name of character from The Rocky Horror Picture Show
CONOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Conchobar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONSUELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kon-SWEH-la
Variant of CONSUELO.
CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κόρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton (Gallicized), French
Feminine form of CORENTIN.
CORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
French form of QUIRINUS.
COSMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Italian variant of COSIMO. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
CRESCENS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin name that was derived from crescere "to grow". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament.
CRESCENTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of CRESCENTIUS. Saint Crescentia was a 4th-century companion of Saint Vitus. This is also the name of the eponymous heroine of a 12th-century German romance.
CYAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIE-an
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κύανος (kyanos).
CYBELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology (Latinized)
Pronounced: SIB-ə-lee(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
CYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Meaning unknown. Saint Cyra was a 5th-century Syrian hermit who was martyred with her companion Marana.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAVETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Cornish form of DAVID.
DELANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-ə-no
From a surname, recorded as de la Noye in French, indicating that the bearer was from a place called La Noue (ultimately Gaulish meaning "wetland, swamp"). It has been used in honour of American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), whose middle name came from his mother's maiden name.
DEMETRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English
Other Scripts: Δημητρία(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of DEMETRIUS.
DESDEMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: dehz-də-MO-nə(English)
Derived from Greek δυσδαίμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated". This was the name of the murdered wife of Othello in Shakespeare's play Othello (1603).
DESPOINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Δέσποινα(Greek)
Pronounced: DHEH-spee-na(Greek)
Means "mistress, lady" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of the daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. She was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at Eleusis near Athens.
DEVORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: דְּבוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of DEBORAH.
DEVRİM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "revolution" in Turkish.
DIAMANTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Διαμαντίνα(Greek)
Variant of DIAMANTO.
DRAGOMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Драгомир(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
EBENEZER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֶבֶן הָעָזֶר(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: eh-bə-NEE-zər(English)
Means "stone of help" in Hebrew. This was the name of a monument erected by Samuel in the Old Testament. Charles Dickens used it for the miserly character Ebenezer Scrooge in his novel A Christmas Carol (1843).
EDGAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, German
Pronounced: EHD-gər(English) EHD-GAR(French)
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton [1]. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EFFIE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHF-ee
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
EHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Means "dusk" in Estonian.
EINION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
EIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "snow" in Welsh.
EIRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֵירָן(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of ERAN.
EIRIAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
EIRLYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: AYR-lis
Means "snowdrop (flower)" in Welsh.
EITHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: EH-nyə
Means "kernel, grain" in Irish. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint, sister of Saint Fidelma and follower of Saint Patrick.
ELAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-LAYN(English) ee-LAYN(English)
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation Le Morte d'Arthur Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic Idylls of the King (1859).
ELANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
ELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of HILDA.
ELEONORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Swedish, Latvian, Dutch, Polish, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Greek
Other Scripts: Елеонора(Bulgarian, Ukrainian) Элеонора(Russian) Ελεονώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-leh-o-NAW-ra(Italian) eh-leh-o-NO-ra(German) eh-leh-aw-NAW-ra(Polish) eh-lyi-u-NO-rə(Russian)
Form of ELEANOR in several languages.
ELESTREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish (Modern, Rare)
Derived from Cornish elester meaning "iris flower". This is a recently coined Cornish name.
ELIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELIOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹר(Hebrew)
Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.
ELISEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: eh-lee-ZEH-o(Italian) eh-lee-SEH-o(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of ELISHA.
ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶלְקָן(Hebrew)
Variant of ELKANAH.
ELLEN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ən
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 19th century, when the form Helen also became common.
ELRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Pronounced: EHL-rik(English)
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC. Both were rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ELROND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Means "star dome" in Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Elrond was the elven ruler of Rivendell.
ELSPETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: EHLS-peth
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
ÉMERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHM-REEK
French form of EMMERICH.
ÉMILIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MEE-LYEHN
French feminine form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Bosnian form of AMIRAH.
EMMARETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: em-ə-RED-ə
Perhaps intended to be a derivative of either Italian amoretto "little love", a diminutive of amore "love" (see AMY), or Amaretto, which refers to an almond-flavored liqueur (the original brand, Amaretto di Saronno, dates to 1851), from the Italian word for "almond" (see also AMARO), with the spelling influenced by the name EMMA. This is the name of a song by the English rock band Deep Purple, recorded in 1969, named for Emmaretta Marks (1945-), a cast member of the musical 'Hair' whom singer Rod Evans (1947-) was trying to seduce.
EMPERATRIZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehm-peh-ra-TREETH(European Spanish) ehm-peh-ra-TREES(Latin American Spanish)
Means "empress" in Spanish.
ENGEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Originally this was a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element angil, referring to the Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles. Since the Middle Ages it has been firmly associated with the German word engel meaning "angel".
ENOCH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: חֲנוֹך(Ancient Hebrew) Ἐνώχ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-nək(English)
From the Hebrew name חֲנוֹך (Chanokh) meaning "dedicated". In Genesis in the Old Testament this is the name of the son of Cain. It is also the name of a son of Jared and the father of Methuselah, who was the supposed author of the apocryphal Books of Enoch.
ENSIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EHN-see-o
Derived from Finnish ensi meaning "first".
ENYO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἐνυώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-NIE-o(English)
Meaning unknown. She was a bloodthirsty Greek war goddess and a companion of Ares.
EOS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἠώς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-AWS(Classical Greek) EE-ahs(English)
Means "dawn" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the dawn.
ÉOWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win(English)
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
ERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Derived from Albanian erë meaning "wind".
EREBUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἔρεβος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ə-bəs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἔρεβος (Erebos), which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
EREZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶרֶז(Hebrew)
Means "cedar" in Hebrew.
ERIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἔρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-is(English)
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
ESMERAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Derived from Turkish esmer "dark" and ay "moon".
ESTEFANÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-teh-fa-NEE-a
Spanish feminine form of STEPHEN.
ESTRELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-TREH-ya
Spanish form of STELLA (1), coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
EUROPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐρώπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yuw-RO-pə(English)
Latinized form of Greek Εὐρώπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.
EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐάδνη(Ancient Greek)
From Greek Εὐάδνη (Euadne), from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὔανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὔανδρος (Euandros) meaning "good of man", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Means "good news" from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1847 epic poem Evangeline [1][2]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVARISTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐάριστος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐάριστος (Euaristos) meaning "well pleasing" from the Greek word εὐάρεστος (euarestos), derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" and ἀρεστός (arestos) meaning "pleasing". This was the name of the fifth pope, supposedly martyred under Emperor Hadrian.
EVERARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
EVREN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish. In Turkic mythology the Evren is a gigantic snake-like dragon.
FALK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FALK
Means "falcon" in German.
FELICITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: fə-LIS-i-tee
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series Felicity.
FIACHRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: FEE-akh-ra(Irish)
Derived from Irish fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: fee-EH-ra
Means "proud" in Esperanto.
FILOMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: fee-lo-MEH-na(Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of PHILOMENA.
FIORELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyo-REHL-la
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GABRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) gab-ree-EHL(English)
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GALADRIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: gə-LAD-ree-əl(English)
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GENEVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-veev
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GEOFFREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JEHF-ree(English) ZHAW-FREH(French)
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.

The Normans introduced this name to England where it became common among the nobility. Famous medieval literary bearers include the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth and the 14th-century poet Geoffrey Chaucer, writer of The Canterbury Tales. By the end of the Middle Ages it had become uncommon, but it was revived in the 20th century, often in the spelling Jeffrey.

GIDEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən(English)
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GINEVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEH-vra
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GIOVANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-na
Italian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of GIOVANNI.
GIOVANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-nee
Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This name has been very common in Italy since the late Middle Ages, as with other equivalents of John in Europe. The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of the name.
GODRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Pronounced: GAHD-rik(English)
Means "god's ruler", derived from Old English god combined with ric "ruler, mighty". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman Conquest.
GOLIATH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גָּלְיָת(Ancient Hebrew) Γολιάθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: gə-LIE-əth(English)
From Hebrew גָּלְיָת (Golyat), possibly derived from גָּלָה (galah) meaning "uncover, reveal". This is the name of the giant Philistine who is slain by David in the Old Testament.
GRAY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAY
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GRISELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: gri-ZEHL-də(English) gree-SEHL-da(Spanish)
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GWYNEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: gwi-NAY-ra
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow".
HALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: هالة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HA-lah
Means "halo around the moon" in Arabic. This was the name of a sister-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad.
HARMONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἁρμονία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HAR-MO-NEE-A(Classical Greek) hahr-MO-nee-ə(English)
Means "harmony, agreement" in Greek. She was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, given by Zeus to Cadmus to be his wife.
HARRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-is, HEHR-is
From a surname that was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 晴菜, 遥菜, 春菜, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HA-ROO-NA
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "spring" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HATHOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἅθωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HATH-awr(English)
Greek form of Egyptian ḥwt-ḥrw (reconstructed as Hut-Heru) meaning "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian ḥwt "house" combined with the god HORUS. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
HECATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑκάτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-ə-tee(English)
From the Greek Ἑκάτη (Hekate), possibly derived from ἑκάς (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LAYN-ə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Latinate form of HELEN.
HELIODOROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἡλιόδωρος(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of HELIODORO.
HENRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHN-ree
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was usually rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the later Middle Ages it was fairly popular, and was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947), and American actor Henry Fonda (1905-1982).

HERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἥρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-RA(Classical Greek) HEHR-ə(English) HEE-rə(English)
Uncertain meaning, possibly from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior"; ὥρα (hora) meaning "period of time"; or αἱρέω (haireo) meaning "to be chosen". In Greek mythology Hera was the queen of the gods, the sister and wife of Zeus. She presided over marriage and childbirth.
HERMIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑρμιόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-MEE-O-NEH(Classical Greek) hər-MIE-ə-nee(English)
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HERO (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἡρώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIR-o(English)
Derived from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing (1599).
HERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἥρων(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HESPEROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἕσπερος(Ancient Greek)
Means "evening" in Greek. This was the name of the personification of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) in Greek mythology.
HESTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑστία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHS-TEE-A(Classical Greek) HEHS-tee-ə(English)
Derived from Greek ἑστία (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HIKARI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) ひかり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KHEE-KA-REE
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
HILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIL-də(English) HIL-da(German) HIL-dah(Dutch) EEL-da(Spanish)
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEGARD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIL-də-gart(German)
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HIRUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-ROO-neh
Variant of IRUNE.
HUGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-goo(Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
IAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Galician, Portuguese
Pronounced: ee-A-gaw(Welsh) ee-AH-go(English) YA-ghuw(Galician)
Welsh and Galician form of Iacobus (see JAMES). This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy Othello (1603).
IDRIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Means "sparkle brilliance" in Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
ILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ηλιάνα(Greek) Илиана(Bulgarian)
Feminine form of ILIAS (Greek) or ILIYA (Bulgarian).
ILITHYIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εἰλείθυια(Ancient Greek)
From the Greek Εἰλείθυια (Eileithyia), which was derived from εἰλήθυια (eilethyia) meaning "the readycomer". This was the name of the Greek goddess of childbirth and midwifery.
IMANI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means "faith" in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
The name of a princess in the play Cymbeline (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".
INANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sumerian Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒈹(Sumerian Cuneiform)
Pronounced: i-NAH-nə(English)
Possibly derived from Sumerian nin-an-a(k) meaning "lady of the heavens", from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒀭 (an) meaning "heaven, sky". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.

Inanna was later conflated with the Semitic (Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian) deity Ishtar.

INDIGO
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon) meaning "Indic, from India".
INDRANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: इन्द्राणी(Sanskrit) ইন্দ্রানী(Bengali) इन्द्राणी, इंद्राणी(Hindi)
Means "queen of INDRA" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess of jealousy and beauty, a wife of Indra.
IO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-AW(Classical Greek) IE-o(English)
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
IONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: ie-O-nə(English)
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
IONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ἰόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-O-nee(English)
From Ancient Greek ἴον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.
IOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Ἰωσήφ(Ancient Greek)
Form of JOSEPH used in the Greek and Latin Bible.
IOSES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἰωσῆς(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of JOSES.
IRA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עִירָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-rə(English)
Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.
IRATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-RA-tee
Means "fern field" in Basque.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עִירִית(Hebrew)
Means "asphodel flower" in Hebrew.
ISABELLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
A shade of white and also a combination of ISABELL and with the added suffix line
ISIDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Serbian, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Исидора(Serbian, Russian) Ἰσιδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ra(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ra(Italian) iz-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
ISIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἶσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis(English)
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
ISKRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Искра(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
From a South Slavic word meaning "spark".
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

ISRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: إسراء(Arabic)
Pronounced: ees-RA
Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) meaning "to travel at night".
IUSTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Latin form of JUSTUS.
IVAYLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ивайло(Bulgarian)
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
IVORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: IE-və-ree(English) IEV-ree(English)
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance that comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.
IZAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-SAR
Means "star" in Basque.
JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAVED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Urdu
Other Scripts: جاود(Persian) جاوید(Urdu)
Means "eternal" in Persian.
JETHRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִתְרוֹ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JETH-ro(English)
From the Hebrew name יִתְרוֹ (Yitro), which was derived from the Hebrew word יֶתֶר (yeter) meaning "abundance". According to the Old Testament, Jethro was a Midianite priest who sheltered Moses when he fled Egypt. He was the father of Zipporah, who became Moses's wife. A famous bearer of the name was Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English inventor and agriculturist.
JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century. It again became quite popular in the first half of the 20th century, entering the top ten names for both the United States and the United Kingdom, though it has since faded.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

Other notable bearers include the actress Joan Crawford (1904-1977) and the comedian Joan Rivers (1933-2014), both Americans.

JOVE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOV(English)
From Latin Iovis, derived from the stem of Iuppiter (see JUPITER). This was another name of the Roman god Jupiter.
JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JUDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-dith(English) YOO-dit(German) khoo-DHEET(Spanish) ZHUY-DEET(French)
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.

As an English name it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, despite a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages. It was however used earlier on the European continent, being borne by several European royals, such as the 9th-century Judith of Bavaria.

JUNO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: YOO-no(Latin) JOO-no(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
JUSTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: YUWS-tuws(German) JUS-təs(English)
Latin name meaning "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KEHR-ə, KAR-ə
Variant of CARA.
KARI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Norwegian short form of KATARINA.
KATARINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-nə
German variant form of KATHERINE.
KERENSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Means "love" in Cornish.
KORAY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "ember moon" in Turkish.
KREINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: קריינע(Yiddish)
From Yiddish קרוין (kroin) meaning "crown".
LAMIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لامعة(Arabic)
Pronounced: LA-mee-‘ah
Means "shining, radiant" in Arabic.
LAN (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Chinese, Vietnamese
Other Scripts: 兰, 岚, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: LAHN(Chinese) LAN(Vietnamese) LANG(Vietnamese)
From Chinese (lán) meaning "orchid, elegant" (which is usually only feminine) or (lán) meaning "mountain mist". Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. As a Vietnamese name, it is derived from Sino-Vietnamese meaning "orchid".
LAVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene
Slovene form of LAURA.
LAZARUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Λάζαρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAZ-ə-rəs(English)
Latinized form of Λάζαρος (Lazaros), a Greek form of ELEAZAR used in the New Testament. Lazarus was a man from Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha, who was restored to life by Jesus.
LEANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λέανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λέανδρος (Leandros), derived from λέων (leon) meaning "lion" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
LEANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dra(Spanish)
Feminine form of LEANDER.
LEGOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Means "green leaves" in Sindarin, from laeg "green" combined with go-lass "collection of leaves". In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Legolas is the son of the elf lord Thranduil and a member of the Fellowship of the Ring.
LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEOCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LEOFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "ruler, mighty".
LERATO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Sotho
Means "love" in Sotho.
LESTARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: lehs-TAH-ree
Means "eternal, abiding" in Indonesian.
LETO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Λητώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-TAW(Classical Greek) LEE-to(English)
Possibly from Lycian lada meaning "wife". Other theories connect it to Greek λήθω (letho) meaning "hidden, forgotten". In Greek mythology she was the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus.
LEVON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Լեւոն(Armenian)
Pronounced: leh-VAWN
Armenian form of LEON. This was the name of several kings of Cilician Armenia, including the first king Levon I the Magnificent.
LEWELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of LLEWELLA.
LEWIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-is
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the Chronicles of Narnia.
LÍADAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-din
Means "grey lady" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend she was a poetess who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief.
LIBITINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown. Libitina was the Roman goddess of funerals, corpses and death.
LIÊN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Vietnamese
Pronounced: LEEN, LEENG
From Sino-Vietnamese (liên) meaning "lotus, water lily".
LILACH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִילָךּ(Hebrew)
Means "lilac" in Hebrew.
LILAVATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Rare), Hindi (Rare)
Other Scripts: लीलावती(Hindi)
Means "amusing, charming, graceful" in Sanskrit. The 12th-century mathematician Bhaskara named one of his systems of mathematics after his daughter Lilavati. This was also the name of a 13th-century queen of Sri Lanka.
LILIAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən(English) LEE-LYAHN(French)
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LINCOLN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LING-kən
From a surname that was originally from the name of a city in England, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
LINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də(English) LIN-da(German, Dutch, Czech) LEEN-da(Italian) LEEN-DA(French) LEEN-dah(Finnish) LEEN-daw(Hungarian)
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
LIOR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר(Hebrew)
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
LOCHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लोचन(Hindi)
Means "the eye" in Sanskrit.
LORCÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LOR-kan
Means "little fierce one", derived from Irish Gaelic lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
LORENZO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: lo-REHN-tso(Italian) lo-REHN-tho(European Spanish) lo-REHN-so(Latin American Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)). Lorenzo de' Medici (1449-1492), known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.
LUCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
LUCASTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called Lucasta (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
LUCIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEHN
Feminine form of LUCIEN.
LUCIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: LOO-cho(Italian) LOO-thyo(European Spanish) LOO-syo(Latin American Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of LUCIUS.
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUDOVIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-DAW-VEEK
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
LUMINIȚA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: loo-mee-NEE-tsa
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.
LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LUSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Լուսինե(Armenian)
Pronounced: loo-see-NEH
From Armenian լուսին (lusin) meaning "moon".
LYCUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύκος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
LYSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λυσάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of Lysandros (see LYSANDER).
LYSISTRATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λυσιστράτη(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of LYSISTRATE.
MAGENTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Theatre
Pronounced: mə-JEN-tə
Named for the mauvish-crimson colour. The dye to make the colour was discovered and named shortly after the Battle of Magenta in 1859 (the town is situated in northern Italy). The colour may have been inspired by the colour of the uniforms worn by the French troops, or by the colour of the land soaked in blood after the battle.

Magenta was a character in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” musical play and movie. She was a domestic maid played by Patricia Quinn.

MAGNUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: MANG-nuys(Swedish) MAHNG-noos(Norwegian) MOW-noos(Danish) MAG-nəs(English)
Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by a 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin (however there was also a Norse name Magni). The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.
MALACHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie(English)
From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhi) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
MALVOLIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Means "ill will" in Italian. This name was invented by Shakespeare for a character in his play Twelfth Night (1602).
MARIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρία(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian, Basque) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARISTELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
From the title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea" in Latin. It can also be a combination of MARÍA and ESTELA.
MELANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mə-LAN-thə
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the suffix antha (from Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play Marriage a la Mode (1672).
MELCHIOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: MEHL-khee-awr(Dutch) MEHL-kee-awr(English)
Possibly from the Hebrew roots מֶלֶכְ (melekh) meaning "king" and אוֹר ('or) meaning "light". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. According to medieval tradition he was a king of Persia.
MELUSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.
MINALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: मीनाली(Hindi)
Means "fish catcher" in Sanskrit.
MORANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slavic Mythology, Croatian
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague" [1]. In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.
MORCANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Welsh
Old Welsh form of MORGAN (1).
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORRIGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
NADRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نضرة(Arabic)
Pronounced: NAD-rah
Means "radiance" in Arabic.
NAGENDRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Other Scripts: नागेन्द्र, नागेंद्र(Sanskrit) ನಾಗೇಂದ್ರ(Kannada) నాగేంద్ర(Telugu)
Means "lord of snakes" from Sanskrit नाग (naga) meaning "snake" (also "elephant") combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for Vasuki, the king of snakes, in Hindu mythology.
NAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: nie-A-ra
From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.
NAIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Aymara
Means "eye" in Aymara.
NĀLANI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: na-LA-nee
Means "the heavens" or "the chiefs" from Hawaiian , a definite article, and lani "heaven, sky, chief".
NASRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Bengali
Other Scripts: نسرین(Persian) নাসরীন(Bengali)
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
NATSUKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 菜月, 夏希, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: NA-TSOO-KYEE
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NEFERTARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TAHR-ee(English)
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ə(English) ok-TA-bya(Spanish) ok-TA-wee-a(Latin)
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
ODAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OHR
Means "dark, grey-brown" in Irish.
ODESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Derived from Greek ὄφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὠρίων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
OTIENO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African, Luo
Means "born at night" in Luo.
OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in(English)
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PHILOMEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FIL-ə-mehl(English)
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
RAFAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) ha-fa-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) RA-fa-ehl(German) RAW-faw-ehl(Hungarian)
Form of RAPHAEL in various languages.
RAJA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رجاء(Arabic)
Pronounced: ra-JA
Means "hope" in Arabic.
RAJANI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: रजनी(Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali) రజని(Telugu) ರಜನಿ(Kannada)
Means "the dark one" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Kali or Durga.
RAMESES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
Pronounced: RAM-ə-seez(English)
From Ῥαμέσσης (Rhamesses), the Greek form of Egyptian rꜥ-ms-sw meaning "born of Ra", composed of the name of the supreme god RA combined with the root msj "be born". Rameses was the name of eleven Egyptian kings of the New Kingdom. The most important of these were Rameses II the Great who campaigned against the Hittites and also built several great monuments, and Rameses III who defended Egypt from the Libyans and Sea Peoples.
RAZIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: רָזִיאֵלָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of RAZIEL.
REESE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Anglicized form of RHYS, also used as a feminine form.
REILLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
From an Irish surname that was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ῥέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: REH-A(Classical Greek) REE-ə(English)
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ῥέω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ἔρα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RÓISÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ro-SHEEN
Diminutive of Irish rós meaning "rose" (a cognate of ROSE).
ROSAIRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RO-ZEHR
Means "rosary" French.
ROSALBA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian name meaning "white rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and alba "white". A famous bearer was the Venetian painter Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757).
ROSALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zə-leen, RAHZ-ə-lin, RAHZ-ə-lien
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost (1594) and Romeo and Juliet (1596).
ROSARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZA-rya
Italian feminine form of ROSARIO.
ROSARIO
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ro-SA-ryo(Spanish) ro-ZA-ryo(Italian)
Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.
ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROYCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROIS
From a surname that was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.
RUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: ROO-na
Feminine form of RUNE.
RUTH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רוּת(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOTH(English) ROOT(German, Spanish)
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.

As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

RYUU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 竜, 龍, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: RYOO
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji or (see RYŪ).
SABAH
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish
Other Scripts: صباح(Arabic)
Pronounced: sa-BAH(Arabic)
Means "morning" in Arabic and Turkish.
SABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-BEHL-ə
Short form of ISABELLA.
SABRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SACNITE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mayan
Variant of SACNICTE.
SAFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: sa-FEE-ra
From Esperanto safiro meaning "sapphire".
SAGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
Pronounced: SAH-gah(Swedish) SA-gha(Icelandic)
Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".
SALACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.
SALATHIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σαλαθιήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-LAH-thee-əl(English)
Greek form of SHEALTIEL. This form is also used in some English versions of the Bible.
SALVADOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: sal-ba-DHOR
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Salvator, which meant "saviour". A famous bearer of this name was the Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1989).
SALVATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
From Salvatrix, the feminine form of Salvator (see SALVADOR).
SALVATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Feminine form of SALVATOR.
SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
SARAI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SEHR-ie(English)
Means "my princess" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this was Sarah's name before God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).
SARANGEREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Сарангэрэл(Mongolian Cyrillic)
Pronounced: sah-RAHN-geh-rehl
Means "moonlight" in Mongolian.
SARIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mormon
Possibly from an alternate reading of Hebrew שׂריה (see SERAIAH). In the Book of Mormon this is the name of Lehi's wife.
SASITHORN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Thai
Other Scripts: ศศิธร(Thai)
Pronounced: sa-see-TAWN
Means "the moon" in Thai (a poetic word).
SAVAŞ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "war" in Turkish.
SAVITRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: सावित्री(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi)
Means "relating to the sun" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hymn dedicated to Savitr, a Hindu sun god, and it is also the name of his daughter. It is borne by several other characters in Hindu epics, including a wife of Brahma, a wife of Shiva, and a daughter of Daksha. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata it is borne by King Satyavan's wife, who successfully pleas with Yama, the god of death, to restore her husband to life.
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SEIRYŪ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese, Far Eastern Mythology
Other Scripts: 青龍, 青竜, 青流, 清龍, 清竜, 清流, 聖龍, 聖竜, 聖流(Japanese Kanji) せいりゅう(Japanese Hiragana) セイリュウ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: SE:-ṘYUU:(Japanese) se:-ṙyuu:(Far Eastern Mythology)
This name combines 青 (shou, sei, ao, ao-, ao.i) meaning "blue, green," 清 (shou, shin, sei, kiyo.i, kiyo.maru, kiyo.meru) meaning "cleanse, exorcise, pure, purify, Manchu dynasty" or 聖 (shou, sei, hijiri) meaning "holy, master, priest, sage, saint" with 龍 (ryuu, ryou, rou, tatsu) meaning "dragon, imperial," 竜 (ryuu, ryou, rou, ise, tatsu) meaning "dragon, imperial" or 流 (ryuu, ru, naga.su, -naga.su, naga.re, naga.reru) meaning "a sink, current, flow, forfeit."

This name coincides with the Blue/Azure Dragon (青竜/青龍) which is a god said to rule the eastern heavens and an auspicious creature in Chinese mythology. It also coincides with the word of the same name (清流) meaning "clear stream."

SERAFEIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σεραφείμ(Greek)
Alternate transcription of Greek Σεραφείμ (see SERAFIM).
SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: sehr-ə-FEEN-ə(English) zeh-ra-FEE-na(German)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each.

This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SEREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SEH-rehn
Means "star" in Welsh.
SERKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "leader, chief" from Turkish ser "head, top" and kan "blood".
SETH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת(Ancient Hebrew) Σήθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH(English)
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SETHUNYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Means "bloom, flower" in Tswana.
SEVERUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "stern" in Latin. This name was borne by several early saints.
SHACHAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שַׁחַר(Hebrew)
Means "dawn" in Hebrew.
SHANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAYN
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
SHARON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAR-ən, SHEHR-ən
From an Old Testament place name, in Hebrew שָׁרוֹן (Sharon), which means "plain", referring to the fertile plain near the coast of Israel. This is also the name of a type of flowering shrub, the rose of Sharon. It has been in use as a given name since the 1920s, possibly inspired by the heroine in the serial novel The Skyrocket (1925) by Adela Rogers St. Johns [1].
SHERAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שֶׁאֱרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHEE-rə(English)
Means "kinswoman" in Hebrew. This is the name of a daughter of Ephraim in the Old Testament.
SHILOH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo(English)
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt gave it to their daughter in 2006.
SHIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 汐音, 汐寧, 潮音, 潮寧, 詩央音, 詩緒音, 紫穂音(Japanese Kanji) しおね(Japanese Hiragana) シオネ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: SHEE-O-NE
This name combines 汐 (seki, ushio, shio, sei) meaning "eventide, opportunity, salt water, tide" or 潮 (chou, ushio, shio) meaning "opportunity, salt water, tide" with 音 (in, on, -non, oto, ne) meaning "noise, sound" or 寧 (nei, mushi.ro) meaning "preferably, rather."
Rare examples of Shione with 3 kanji include 詩央音, 詩緒音 and 紫穂音 with 詩 (shi, uta) meaning "poem, poetry", 央 (ou, o) meaning "centre, middle", 緒 (sho, cho, itoguchi, o) meaning "beginning, cord, end, inception, strap, thong", 紫 (shi, murasaki) meaning "purple, violet" and 穂 (sui, ho, o) meaning "crest (of wave), ear, ear (of grain), head."

One bearer of this name is actress Shione Sawada (澤田 汐音) (1998-).

SHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שִׁירָה(Hebrew)
Means "singing" in Hebrew.
SHIRYŪ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 志龍, 志竜, 子龍, 子竜, 史龍, 史竜, 紫龍, 紫竜(Japanese Kanji) しりゅう(Japanese Hiragana) シリュウ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: SHEE-ṘYUU:
This name combines 志 (shi, kokorozashi, kokoroza.su, shiringu) meaning "aspire, hopes, intention, motive, plan, resolve, shilling," 子 (shi, su, tsu, ko, -ko, -ne) meaning "child, sign of the rat (1st sign of the Chinese zodiac)," 史 (shi) meaning "chronicle, history" or 紫 (shi, murasaki) meaning "purple, violet" with 龍 (ryuu, ryou, rou, tatsu) meaning "dragon, imperial" or 竜 (ryuu, ryou, rou, ise, tatsu) meaning "dragon, imperial."
SIAVASH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: سیاوش(Persian)
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 10th-century Persian epic the Shahnameh.
SILVESTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Slovene
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Feminine form of SILVESTER.
SIMON (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон(Macedonian) სიმონ(Georgian) Σίμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən(English) SEE-MAWN(French) SEE-mawn(Danish, Dutch) ZEE-mawn(German) SHEE-mon(Hungarian)
From Σίμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεών, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became more rare after the Protestant Reformation.

SIOBHÁN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: shi-VAWN, SHI-wan
Irish form of Jehanne, a Norman French variant of JEANNE.
SIOFRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEE-frə
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.
SIRIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: SIR-ee-əs(English)
The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σείριος (seirios) meaning "burning".
SITARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: ستارہ(Urdu)
Means "star" in Urdu, ultimately from Persian.
SLADE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLAYD
From a surname that meant "valley" in Old English.
SLOANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLON
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SORA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 空, 昊, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SO-RA
From Japanese (sora) or (sora) both meaning "sky". Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also form this name.
SORCHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: SAWR-ə-khə(Irish) SAWR-khə(Irish)
Means "radiant" in Gaelic. It is sometimes used as an Irish form of Sarah.
SORELL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SOR-el
English surname derived from the Old French nickname Sorel, meaning "chestnut", and given to those with red-brown hair. A famous namesake is biologist Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, the brother of Aldous Huxley.
SORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Possibly derived from Romanian soare meaning "sun".
SOTIRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σωτήρης(Greek)
Derived from Greek σωτηρία (soteria) meaning "salvation".
SPENCER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEHN-sər
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
STEFANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: STEH-fa-no
Italian form of STEPHEN.
STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
STELLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
STERRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: STEHR-rə
Derived from Dutch ster meaning "star".
SUNNIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
SUZANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: SUY-ZAN(French) soo-ZAN(English) suy-ZAH-nə(Dutch)
French form of SUSANNA.
SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə(Russian)
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
SWANHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
TABBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAB-ee
Diminutive of TABITHA.
TAFARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African (Rare), Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ተፈሪ(Amharic)
Possibly means "he who inspires awe" in Amharic. This name was borne by Lij Tafari Makonnen (1892-1975), also known as Haile Selassie, the last emperor of Ethiopia. Rastafarians (Ras Tafari meaning "king Tafari") revere him as the earthly incarnation of God.
TAIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: TAH-ee-kah
Means "magic, spell" in Finnish.
TAISTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TIES-to
Means "battle" in Finnish.
TAKARA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TA-KA-RA
From Japanese (takara) meaning "treasure, jewel", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TARAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Тарас(Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: tu-RAS(Russian)
Ukrainian and Russian form of the Greek name Ταράσιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
TEMPERANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
TERATAI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Malay
Derived from Malay teratai meaning "waterlily".
TESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TEHS-ə(English)
Diminutive of THERESA.
THADDEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Θαδδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs(English) tha-DEE-əs(English)
From Θαδδαῖος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεόδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
THANATOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Θάνατος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TA-NA-TOS(Classical Greek) THAN-ə-tahs(English)
Means "death" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of death who resided with Hades in the underworld.
THEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Θέμις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-MEES(Classical Greek) THEE-mis(English)
Means "law of nature, divine law, that which is laid down" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan who presided over custom and natural law. She was often depicted blindfolded and holding a pair of scales. By Zeus she was the mother of many deities, including the three Μοῖραι (Moirai) and the three Ὥραι (Horai).
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Θήρων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-RAWN(Classical Greek) THEHR-ən(English)
Derived from Greek θηράω (therao) meaning "to hunt".
THORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
TINUVIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Means "nightingale" in Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tinuviel was the daughter of Thingol the elf king and the beloved of Beren, who with her help retrieved one of the Silmarils from the iron crown of Morgoth.
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TISIPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τισιφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ti-SIF-ə-nee(English)
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τίσις (tisis) meaning "vengeance" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
TONDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: TON-dra
Means "thunderous", from Esperanto tondro meaning "thunder".
TORSTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, German
Pronounced: TOSH-tehn(Swedish) TAWRS-tən(German)
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
ÚNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OO-nə
Possibly derived from Irish uan meaning "lamb".
URSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Feminine form of URSUS. This is the name of two constellations in the northern sky: Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.
USAGI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: OO-SA-GYEE(Japanese)
Means "rabbit" in Japanese. This name was used on the Japanese television show Sailor Moon, which first aired in the 1990s.
UTARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Javanese
Pronounced: oo-TAH-ree
Javanese form of UTTARA.
VALDÍS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1], Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse valr "the dead" and dís "goddess".
VALENCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ba-LEHN-sya(Latin American Spanish) ba-LEHN-thya(European Spanish) və-LEHN-see-ə(English)
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".
VALENTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Italian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree(English) VA-lə-ree(German)
English and German form of VALERIA, as well as a Czech variant of VALÉRIE.
VALKYRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: VAL-ki-ree(English)
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.
VASHTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: וַשְׁתִּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: VASH-tee(English)
Possibly means "thread" in Hebrew, but it is most likely of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of the first wife of King Ahasuerus of Persia before he marries Esther.
VELASCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish
Pronounced: beh-LAS-ko(Spanish)
Medieval Spanish form of VASCO.
VÉRÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
French form of VERENA.
VESNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Весна(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VEHS-na(Croatian, Serbian)
Means "spring" in many Slavic languages. This was the name of a Slavic spirit associated with the springtime. It has been used as a given name only since the 20th century.
VESPERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: vehs-PEH-ra
Means "of the evening", derived from Esperanto vespero "evening", ultimately from Latin vesper.
VIATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Earlier form of BEATRIX.
VIORICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Derived from Romanian viorea (see VIOREL).
VIRGINIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEER-ZHEE-NEE
French form of VIRGINIA.
VIRIDIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Archaic), Medieval Italian
Pronounced: VI-ri-diss
Derived from the Latin color word viridis "green".
As a given name, Viridis was intended to refer to the colour of growing foliage and thus acquired the transferred meaning of "young; youthful; fresh; lively; blooming".

A known bearer is Viridis della Scala (died 1394), daughter of Mastino II della Scala, lord of Verona, and wife of Niccolò II d'Este, lord of Ferrara, Modena and Parma.
Her niece Viridis Visconti later went on to marry Duke Leopold III of Austria.

VLADIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владимир(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: vlu-DYEE-myir(Russian) VLA-dee-meer(Serbian, Croatian)
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VULCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: VUL-kən(English)
From the Latin Vulcanus, possibly related to fulgere meaning "to flash", but more likely of pre-Latin origin. In Roman mythology Vulcan was the god of fire. He was later equated with the Greek god Hephaestus.
WILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang(German) WUWLF-gang(English)
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WOLFRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VAWL-fram
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
WULFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Old English form of ULRIC.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Derived from Greek ξανθός (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə(English)
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
XOLANI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu
Means "peace" in Zulu.
YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Юрий(Russian) Юрій(Ukrainian) Юрый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian Юрий, Ukrainian Юрій or Belarusian Юрый (see YURIY).
YUUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 優菜, 優奈, 柚菜, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-NA
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 優菜 or 優奈 or 柚菜 (see YŪNA).
YUUTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 優斗, 悠斗, 悠人, 悠翔, 優翔, 柚翔, 祐翔, 勇人, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-TO
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 優斗 or 悠斗 or 悠人 or 悠翔 or 優翔 or 柚翔 or 祐翔 or 勇人 (see YŪTO).
ZIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of ZIV.
ZORAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: tho-RIE-dha(European Spanish) so-RIE-dha(Latin American Spanish)
Perhaps means "enchanting" or "dawn" in Arabic. This was the name of a minor 12th-century Spanish saint, a convert from Islam. The name was used by Cervantes for a character in his novel Don Quixote (1606), in which Zoraida is a beautiful Moorish woman of Algiers who converts to Christianity and elopes with a Spanish officer.
ZORNITSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Зорница(Bulgarian)
Means "morning star" in Bulgarian.
ŽYDRŪNĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Pronounced: zheed-ROO-nyeh
Feminine form of ŽYDRŪNAS.
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