ms.felice's Personal Name List

Adelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Other Scripts: Аделина(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-deh-LEE-na(Italian) a-dheh-LEE-na(Spanish)
From a Latinized Germanic name that was derived from the element adal meaning "noble".
Adeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: A-DU-LEEN(French) AD-ə-lien(English)
French and English form of Adelina.
Aiko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛子, etc.(Japanese Kanji) あいこ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: A-EE-KO
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other character combinations.
Aldo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AL-do(Italian)
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ald "old", and possibly also with adal "noble".
Alvise
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: al-VEE-zeh
Venetian form of Louis.
Amelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian) an-MEH-lya(Polish)
Variant of Amalia, though it is sometimes confused with Emilia, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

Angelo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ANG-jeh-lo
Italian form of Angelus (see Angel).
Annunziata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: an-noon-TSYA-ta
Means "announced" in Italian, referring to the event in the New Testament in which the angel Gabriel tells the Virgin Mary of the imminent birth of Jesus.
Apollonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Italian
Other Scripts: Ἀπολλωνία(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of Apollonios. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
Arcangelo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Means "archangel" in Italian.
Aura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
Aurelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Feminine form of Aurelius.
Aureliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aurelianus.
Aureliano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ow-reh-LYA-no(Spanish)
Spanish and Italian form of Aurelianus.
Aurelio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lyo
Italian and Spanish form of Aurelius.
Azzurra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ad-DZOOR-ra
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
Beckett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BEHK-it
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
Bradley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAD-lee
From a surname that originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
Callisto 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: kal-LEE-sto
Italian form of Callistus.
Catia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian diminutive of Caterina.
Celestina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: theh-lehs-TEE-na(European Spanish) seh-lehs-TEE-na(Latin American Spanish) cheh-leh-STEE-na(Italian)
Latinate feminine form of Caelestinus.
Chiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KYA-ra
Italian form of Clara. Saint Chiara (commonly called Saint Clare in English) was a follower of Saint Francis of Assisi.
Claudia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Latin)
Feminine form of Claudius. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
Claudio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: KLOW-dyo(Italian) KLOW-dhyo(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Claudius.
Coraline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, French
Pronounced: KAWR-ə-lien(English) KAW-RA-LEEN(French)
Created by the French composer Adolphe Adam for one of the main characters in his opera Le toréador (1849). He probably based it on the name Coralie. It was also used by the author Neil Gaiman for the young heroine in his novel Coraline (2002). Gaiman has stated that in this case the name began as a typo of Caroline.
Damiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-na
Italian feminine form of Damian.
Damiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-no
Italian form of Damian.
Dashiell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
Desideria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: deh-see-DHEH-rya(Spanish)
Feminine form of Desiderio. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
Diletta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: dee-LEHT-ta
Means "beloved" in Italian, from Latin dilectus.
Edgar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, German
Pronounced: EHD-gər(English) EHD-GAR(French)
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton [1]. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
Edgardo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: edh-GHAR-dho(Spanish) ehd-GAR-do(Italian)
Spanish and Italian form of Edgar.
Efisio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-FEE-zyo
From the Latin byname Ephesius, which originally belonged to a person who was from the city of Ephesus in Ionia. This was the name of a saint martyred on Sardinia in the 4th century.
Eliana 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English (Modern)
Pronounced: eh-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Éliane.
Ettore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHT-to-reh
Italian form of Hector.
Eufemia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ew-FEH-mya(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Euphemia.
Euphemia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
Fausta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Faustus.
Felice
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: feh-LEE-cheh
Italian form of Felix.
Felicia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Pronounced: fə-LEE-shə(English) feh-LEE-cha(Italian) feh-LEE-thya(European Spanish) feh-LEE-sya(Latin American Spanish) feh-LEE-chee-a(Romanian) feh-LEE-see-ah(Dutch, Swedish)
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of Felix. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
Feliciana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: feh-lee-THYA-na(European Spanish) feh-lee-SYA-na(Latin American Spanish) feh-lee-CHA-na(Italian)
Feminine form of Felicianus (see Feliciano).
Feliciano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: feh-lee-THYA-no(European Spanish) feh-lee-SYA-no(Latin American Spanish) feh-lee-CHA-no(Italian)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of the Roman name Felicianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name Felix. It was borne by a number of early saints, including a 3rd-century bishop of Foligno.
Fiammetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Fiore
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: FYO-reh
Means "flower" in Italian. It can also be considered an Italian form of the Latin names Flora and Florus.
Flavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya(Italian) FLA-bya(Spanish)
Feminine form of Flavius.
Flavio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: FLA-vyo(Italian) FLA-byo(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Flavius.
Flora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, French, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(Spanish, German) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
Fortunata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: for-too-NA-ta(Italian, Spanish)
Feminine form of Fortunato.
Fortunato
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: for-too-NA-to(Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Fortunatus meaning "fortunate, blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
Fulgenzio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: fool-JEHN-tsyo
Italian form of Fulgentius (see Fulgencio).
Gelsomina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jehl-so-MEE-na
Italian form of Jasmine.
Gioacchino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-ak-KEE-no
Italian form of Joachim.
Gioachino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-a-KEE-no
Italian form of Joachim. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).
Giotto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: JAWT-to
Possibly from Ambrogiotto, a diminutive of Ambrogio, or Angiolotto, a diminutive of Angiolo. This name was borne by Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), an Italian painter and architect.
Guerino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Warin.
Hector
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Other Scripts: Ἕκτωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-tər(English) EHK-TAWR(French)
Latinized form of Greek Ἕκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ἕκτωρ (hektor) meaning "holding fast", ultimately from ἔχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends where it belongs to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It has been historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

Horatio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho
Variant of Horatius. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
Ilaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian feminine form of Hilarius.
Ileana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-LYA-na(Romanian)
Possibly a Romanian variant of Elena. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
Inara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Popular Culture
The name of a leading female character from the TV show Firefly and Serenity movie created by Joss Whedon.

It is sometimes claimed to be a feminine form of the Basque masculine name Inar, with the meaning "ray of light", or a feminine name of Arabic origin with the meaning "heaven sent". Both of these origins, however, seem suspicious at best.

Iolanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian
Pronounced: yo-LAN-da(Italian, Romanian) yoo-LAN-də(Catalan)
Italian, Portuguese, Catalan and Romanian form of Yolanda.
Isacco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZAK-ko
Italian form of Isaac.
Isidora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Serbian, Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Исидора(Serbian) Ἰσιδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ra(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ra(Italian) iz-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Feminine form of Isidore. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
Isidoro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ro(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ro(Italian)
Spanish and Italian form of Isidore.
Ismaele
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Ishmael.
Itala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian feminine form of Italus.
James
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ(English)
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see Jacob). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

This name has been used in England since the 13th century, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. In American name statistics (recorded since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it arguably the era's most consistently popular name. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States from 1940 to 1952.

Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

Juniper
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
Katiuscia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ka-TYOOSH-sha
Italian form of Katyusha.
Keith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: KEETH(English)
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
Laurence 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əns
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

Leoluca
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Combination of Leone 1 and Luca 1. This was the name of a 9th-century Sicilian saint.
Livia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LEE-vya(Italian)
Feminine form of Livius. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
Llewyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Probably from the Welsh word llew meaning "lion", though it is not used as a name in Wales. It was used in the 2013 film 'Inside Llewyn Davis'.
Luca 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see Luke). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
Luce
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, French
Pronounced: LOO-cheh(Italian) LUYS(French)
Italian and French variant of Lucia. This also means "light" in Italian.
Luciana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHA-na(Italian) loo-THYA-na(European Spanish) loo-SYA-na(Latin American Spanish)
Feminine form of Lucianus.
Luciano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: loo-CHA-no(Italian) loo-THYA-no(European Spanish) loo-SYA-no(Latin American Spanish)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Lucianus.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Maddalena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mad-da-LEH-na
Italian form of Magdalene.
Marcellina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Marcellinus.
Marcellino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mar-chehl-LEE-no
Italian form of Marcellinus.
Marcello
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mar-CHEHL-lo
Italian form of Marcellus.
Marco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MAR-ko(Italian, Spanish, German) MAR-koo(European Portuguese) MAKH-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) MAHR-ko(Dutch)
Italian form of Marcus (see Mark). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
Margherita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mar-geh-REE-ta
Italian form of Margaret. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margot
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
French short form of Margaret.
Mariantonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Combination of Mary and Antonia.
Marilena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: ma-ree-LEH-na(Italian)
Combination of Maria and Elena.
Marina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρίνα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Marinella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Diminutive of Marina.
Maristella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Maristela.
Marlena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, English
Pronounced: mar-LEH-na(Polish) mahr-LEEN-ə(English)
Latinate form of Marlene.
Marzio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: MAR-tsyo
Italian form of Marcius.
Massimiliano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mas-see-mee-LYA-no
Italian form of Maximilian.
Mattea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TEH-a
Italian feminine form of Matthew.
Matteo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TEH-o
Italian form of Matthew.
Melchiorre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mehl-KYAWR-reh
Italian form of Melchior.
Mercurio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Mercury.
Michelangela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: mee-keh-LAN-jeh-la
Feminine form of Michelangelo.
Michelangelo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-keh-LAN-jeh-lo(Italian) mie-kə-LAN-jə-lo(English)
Combination of Michael and Angelo, referring to the archangel Michael. The Renaissance painter and sculptor Michelangelo Buonarroti, from Florence, was the man who created such great works of art as the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This name was also borne by the Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi, better known as Caravaggio.
Milena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Italian
Other Scripts: Милена(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Russian)
Pronounced: MI-leh-na(Czech) myee-LEH-na(Polish) myi-LYEH-nə(Russian) MEE-leh-na(Slovak) mee-LEH-na(Italian)
Feminine form of Milan. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of Maria and Elena.
Mirabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Latinate form of Mirabelle.
Miriam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) mee-RYAM(Spanish) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Hebrew form of Mary. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
Misbah
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Indonesian
Other Scripts: مصباح(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: mees-BAH(Arabic)
Means "lamp, light, luminary" in Arabic.
Movses
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Մովսես(Armenian)
Armenian form of Moses.
Myriam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RYAM
French form of Miriam.
Nadia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Variant of Nadya 1 used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
Natalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλία(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian, Bulgarian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Latinate form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Natalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Diminutive of Natalia (Italian) or Natália (Portuguese).
Natalino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Diminutive of Natale.
Nero 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEH-ro
Short form of Raniero.
Niccolò
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: neek-ko-LAW
Italian form of Nicholas. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.
Nico
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Italian, Dutch, Spanish)
Short form of Nicholas (or sometimes Nicodemus).
Nicolò
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: nee-ko-LAW
Italian variant form (particularly Sicilian) of Nicholas.
Nicomede
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: nee-ko-MEH-deh
Italian form of Nikomedes.
Nicostrato
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: nee-ko-STRA-to
Italian form of Nikostratos.
Oliver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

Orpheus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὀρφεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: OR-PEWS(Classical Greek) AWR-fee-əs(English)
Perhaps related to Greek ὄρφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
Ottaviano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Octavianus (see Octavian).
Petronia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Petronius.
Raffaello
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Raphael.
Raniero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ra-NYEH-ro
Italian form of Rayner.
Renata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Polish, Czech, Lithuanian, Croatian, Slovene, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: reh-NA-ta(Italian, Spanish, German, Polish) REH-na-ta(Czech)
Feminine form of Renatus.
Rosangela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-zan-JEH-la
Combination of Rosa 1 and Angela.
Salvatrice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
From Salvatrix, the feminine form of Salvator (see Salvador).
Sam 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: SAM(English)
Short form of Samuel, Samson, Samantha and other names beginning with Sam. In J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) this is a short form of Samwise.
Saturnina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-na(Spanish)
Feminine form of Saturninus. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
Saturnino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-no(Spanish, Italian)
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Saturninus.
Savio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: SA-vyo
Means "clever, bright" in Italian.
Sebastiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Sebastianus (see Sebastian).
Sebastiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Sebastianus (see Sebastian).
Selvaggia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: sehl-VAD-ja
Means "wild" in Italian.
Serafina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: seh-ra-FEE-na(Spanish, Polish)
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Polish form of Seraphina.
Serafino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Seraphinus (see Seraphina).
Silver
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
Silvestra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Feminine form of Silvester.
Siria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: SEE-rya
Possibly a feminine form of Cyrus. It also coincides with the Italian name for the country of Syria.
Sloane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLON
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name Sluaghadhán.
Sofia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Finnish, Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Σοφία(Greek) София(Russian, Bulgarian) Софія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: saw-FEE-a(Greek) so-FEE-a(Italian) soo-FEE-u(European Portuguese) so-FEE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) soo-FEE-ə(Catalan) suw-FEE-a(Swedish) zo-FEE-a(German) SO-fee-ah(Finnish)
Form of Sophia used in various languages.
Sparrow
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SPAR-o, SPEHR-o
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
Sveva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Possibly from the name of the Germanic tribe of the Suebi (svevo in Italian).
Sylver
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
Variant of Silver, perhaps intended to be a feminine form. It could also be used as a short form of Sylvester.
Teresa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan, Polish, Lithuanian, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: teh-REH-sa(Spanish, Polish) teh-REH-za(Italian, German) tə-REH-zə(Catalan) tyeh-ryeh-SU(Lithuanian) TEH-reh-sah(Finnish) tə-REE-sə(English) tə-REE-zə(English)
Form of Theresa used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the Albanian missionary Saint Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), better known as Mother Teresa, who worked with the poor in India. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
Valenta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Archaic)
Valentina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Lithuanian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) Βαλεντίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-na(Italian) və-lyin-TYEE-nə(Russian) vu-lyehn-tyi-NU(Lithuanian) ba-lehn-TEE-na(Spanish)
Feminine form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
Valentino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Italian form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1).
Vauquelin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval French
Old French form of the Germanic name Walchelin, derived from the element walha meaning "foreign".
Velia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: VEH-lya
From the Roman family name Velius, which possibly means "concealed" in Latin.
Venera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sicilian, Russian, Bulgarian, Albanian
Other Scripts: Венера(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: vyi-NYEH-rə(Russian)
Form of Venus, from the genitive form Veneris. This name was borne by a 2nd-century saint who was martyred in Rome or Sicily.
Vespasiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Vespasianus (see Vespasian).
Vianne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a combination of Vi and Anne 1 or a short form of Vivianne.
Vincente
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: veen-CHEHN-teh
Italian variant form of Vincent.
Violante
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-teh(Italian)
Latin form of Yolanda.
Virna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
As an Italian name it owes its usage primarily to the actress Virna Lisi (1936-2014). Her name was invented by her father.
Vitaliano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Vitalianus.
Vito
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: VEE-to(Italian) BEE-to(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Vitus.
Vittorino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Victorinus.
Ylenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Variant of Ilenia.
Zaira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: DZIE-ra(Italian) THIE-ra(European Spanish) SIE-ra(Latin American Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Zaïre. It was used by Vincenzo Bellini for the heroine of his opera Zaira (1829), which was based on Voltaire's 1732 play Zaïre.
Zita 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Latvian
Pronounced: DZEE-ta(Italian) TSEE-ta(German) ZI-ta(Czech) ZEE-ta(Slovak) zyi-TU(Lithuanian)
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
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