Realisticmindxxx's Personal Name List

Abram 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: אַבְרָם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brəm(English)
Rating: 56% based on 25 votes
Means "high father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament God changed Abram's name to Abraham (see Genesis 17:5).
Adam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian) Αδάμ, Άνταμ(Greek) אָדָם(Hebrew) آدم(Arabic) ადამ(Georgian) Ἀδάμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AD-əm(English) A-DAHN(French) A-dam(German, Polish, Czech, Arabic) A-dahm(Dutch) AH-dam(Swedish) u-DAM(Russian) ah-DAHM(Ukrainian) ə-DHAM(Catalan)
Rating: 70% based on 26 votes
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) meaning "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

Addison
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-i-sən
Rating: 36% based on 24 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Adam". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
Adler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 30% based on 23 votes
Means "eagle" in German. It is not used as a given name in Germany itself.
Adner
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
Pronounced: AD-nər(English)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 23% based on 23 votes
Adrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан(Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən(English) a-dree-AN(Romanian) A-dryan(Polish) A-dree-an(German) u-dryi-AN(Russian)
Rating: 59% based on 29 votes
Form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
Adriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַדְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 34% based on 20 votes
Means "flock of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a man who married Saul's daughter Merab.
Alaric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 58% based on 26 votes
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
Alban
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-ban(German) AL-BAHN(French) AL-bən(English) AWL-bən(English)
Rating: 36% based on 19 votes
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
Alden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWL-dən
Rating: 56% based on 20 votes
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given name Ealdwine.
Aldric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AL-DREEK(French)
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, mighty". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
Alec
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ik
Rating: 51% based on 23 votes
Short form of Alexander.
Aleksan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Ալեքսան(Armenian)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 26% based on 19 votes
Armenian short form of Aleksandr.
Alexander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Rating: 65% based on 26 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

Alexandrew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: al-eg-ZAN-dru
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 21% based on 23 votes
Blend of Alexander and Andrew.
Alexavier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: Al-ex-av-er, Al-ex-a-vi-er
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 19% based on 23 votes
Blend of Alexander and Xavier.
Alistair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Rating: 67% based on 23 votes
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWL-tən
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
From an Old English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
Alvis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Latvian
Rating: 24% based on 19 votes
From the Old Norse Alvíss meaning "all wise". In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf who was to marry Thor's daughter Thrud. Thor was not pleased with this so he tricked Alvis by asking him questions until the sun rose, at which time the dwarf was turned into stone.
Amias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
Variant of Amyas.
Andrew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo(English)
Rating: 61% based on 23 votes
English form of the Greek name Ἀνδρέας (Andreas), which was derived from ἀνδρεῖος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

Arcadius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀρκάδιος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 29% based on 17 votes
Latinized form of Arkadios.
Aric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 28% based on 17 votes
Variant of Eric.
Aris 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Άρης(Greek)
Rating: 39% based on 14 votes
Modern Greek form of Ares. It is also used as a short form of Aristotelis.
Arlo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-lo
Rating: 44% based on 17 votes
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
Arthur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 21 votes
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius [1]). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth [2]. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

Athan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek (Anglicized, Rare)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 34% based on 16 votes
Azariah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲזַרְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: az-ə-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 17 votes
Means "Yahweh has helped" in Hebrew, derived from עָזַר ('azar) meaning "help" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of many Old Testament characters including of one of the three men the Babylonian king ordered cast into a fiery furnace. His Babylonian name was Abednego.
Azrael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 35% based on 17 votes
Variant of Azriel. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
Blake
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYK
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
Boris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German
Other Scripts: Борис(Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian, Macedonian) ბორის(Georgian)
Pronounced: bu-RYEES(Russian) BAWR-is(English) BO-rees(Croatian) BO-ris(Czech, German) BAW-rees(Slovak)
Rating: 23% based on 16 votes
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
Bram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BRAM(English) BRAHM(Dutch)
Rating: 47% based on 17 votes
Short form of Abraham. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote Dracula.
Brody
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRO-dee
Rating: 39% based on 19 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
Cade
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAYD
Rating: 32% based on 18 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
Cainan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קֵינָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-nən(English) kay-IE-nən(English)
Rating: 29% based on 18 votes
Variant of Kenan.
Caleb
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Rating: 64% based on 22 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

Cameron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
Rating: 56% based on 21 votes
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
Carter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-tər
Rating: 46% based on 18 votes
From an English surname that meant "one who uses a cart". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Jimmy Carter (1924-).
Cassius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-oos(Latin) KASH-əs(English) KAS-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 63% based on 18 votes
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
Chandler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAND-lər
Rating: 38% based on 20 votes
From an occupational surname that meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
Charlie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAHR-lee
Rating: 56% based on 19 votes
Diminutive or feminine form of Charles. A famous bearer was the British comic actor Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977). It is also borne by Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz.
Chase
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAYS
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
Christoph
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: KRIS-tawf
Rating: 42% based on 18 votes
German form of Christopher.
Cody
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KO-dee
Rating: 25% based on 17 votes
From the Irish surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of Cuidightheach". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Cole
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
Rating: 33% based on 19 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the Old English byname Cola.
Colin 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, English
Pronounced: KAHL-in(Scottish, Irish, English) KOL-in(English)
Rating: 58% based on 19 votes
Anglicized form of Cailean or Coilean.
Connor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Rating: 62% based on 19 votes
Variant of Conor.
Corey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-ee
Rating: 26% based on 17 votes
From a surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning. This name became popular in the 1960s due to the character Corey Baker on the television series Julia [1].
Dakota
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Rating: 36% based on 18 votes
From the name of the Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley, or from the two American states that were named for them: North and South Dakota (until 1889 unified as the Dakota Territory). The tribal name means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language.
Dallas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAL-əs
Rating: 33% based on 18 votes
From a surname that could either be of Old English origin meaning "valley house" or of Scottish Gaelic origin meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George M. Dallas (1792-1864).
Damian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Romanian, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən(English) DAN-myan(Polish)
Rating: 54% based on 20 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανός (Damianos), which was derived from Greek δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmas in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
Daniel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Finnish, Estonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) də-nee-EHL(Catalan) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Rating: 61% based on 23 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

Dante
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-teh
Rating: 57% based on 22 votes
Medieval short form of Durante. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the Divine Comedy.
Darian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ee-ən
Rating: 43% based on 18 votes
Probably an elaborated form of Darren.
Darren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ən
Rating: 41% based on 16 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be from a rare Irish surname or it could be an altered form of Darrell. It was first brought to public attention in the late 1950s by the American actor Darren McGavin (1922-2006). It was further popularized in the 1960s by the character Darrin Stephens from the television show Bewitched.
David
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) də-BEET(Catalan) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Rating: 60% based on 23 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

Davin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAV-in
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
Possibly a variant of Devin influenced by David.
Dean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
From a surname, see Dean 1 and Dean 2. The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
Delaney
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: di-LAYN-ee
Rating: 29% based on 17 votes
From a surname: either the English surname Delaney 1 or the Irish surname Delaney 2.
Demetrio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: deh-MEH-tryo
Rating: 25% based on 15 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Demetrius.
Desmond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEHZ-mənd(English)
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
Dominic
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHM-i-nik
Rating: 56% based on 19 votes
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
Donovan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə-vən(English)
Rating: 52% based on 19 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of Donndubhán".
Dorian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Romanian
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 56% based on 18 votes
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.
Douglas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUG-ləs
Rating: 51% based on 16 votes
Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). Douglas was originally a place name (for example, a tributary of the River Clyde), which then became a Scottish clan name borne by a powerful line of earls. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
Dylan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an(Welsh) DIL-ən(English)
Rating: 54% based on 17 votes
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series Beverly Hills 90210.

Eden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: עֵדֶן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-dən(English)
Rating: 26% based on 17 votes
Possibly from Hebrew עֵדֶן ('eden) meaning "pleasure, delight", or perhaps derived from Sumerian 𒂔 (edin) meaning "plain". According to the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
Edmund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

Edric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHD-rik
Rating: 21% based on 15 votes
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "ruler". After the Norman Conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
Edwin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 57% based on 17 votes
Means "rich friend", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
Eliah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: E-lyuh(Italian) Ay-lee-uh(Dutch)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 42% based on 16 votes
Italian and Dutch form of Elijah.
Elias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek) Ἠλίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Rating: 73% based on 22 votes
Form of Elijah used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
Elliot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 80% based on 20 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Elliott.
Elwin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-win
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Variant of Alvin.
Emerson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ər-sən
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Emery". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
Emil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
Other Scripts: Емил(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Эмиль(Russian)
Pronounced: EH-mil(Swedish, Czech) EH-meel(German, Slovak, Hungarian) eh-MEEL(Romanian) EHN-myeel(Polish) eh-MYEEL(Russian) ə-MEEL(English) EHM-il(English)
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
Eric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, German, Spanish
Pronounced: EHR-ik(English) EH-rik(Swedish, German) EH-reek(Spanish)
Rating: 49% based on 17 votes
Means "ever ruler", from the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler, mighty". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

This common Norse name was first brought to England by Danish settlers during the Anglo-Saxon period. It was not popular in England in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, in part due to the children's novel Eric, or Little by Little (1858) by Frederic William Farrar.

Ethan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən(English) EH-TAN(French)
Rating: 56% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

Eugene
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: YOO-jeen, yoo-JEEN
Rating: 29% based on 15 votes
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὐγένιος (Eugenios), which was derived from the Greek word εὐγενής (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and γενής (genes) meaning "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.

This name was not particularly common in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. It became more popular in part due to the fame of Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736), a French-born general who served the Austrian Empire. A notable bearer was the American playwright Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953).

Evan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EHV-ən(English)
Rating: 56% based on 17 votes
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of John.
Everett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Everard.
Fannar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 19% based on 16 votes
Possibly derived from Old Norse fǫnn meaning "snow drift".
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 64% based on 21 votes
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Finnick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: FIN-ik(Literature)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
Created by author Suzanne Collins for a character in her 'Hunger Games' series of books, where it belongs to a victor and rebel from District 4. She may have derived it from the slang word finicky meaning "demanding", or perhaps it was intended to be a diminutive of Finn (compare Finnegan).

Character in Disney's Zootopia.

Forest
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWR-ist
Rating: 54% based on 18 votes
Variant of Forrest, or else directly from the English word forest.
Francesco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fran-CHEHS-ko
Rating: 44% based on 17 votes
Italian form of Franciscus (see Francis). Francesco Laurana was an Italian Renaissance sculptor.
Francisco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fran-THEES-ko(European Spanish) fran-SEES-ko(Latin American Spanish) frun-SEESH-koo(Portuguese) frun-SEES-koo(Portuguese)
Rating: 38% based on 16 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Franciscus (see Francis). This is the Spanish name of Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). Other notable bearers include the Spanish painter and engraver Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) and the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco (1892-1975).
Gavin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in(English)
Rating: 58% based on 21 votes
Medieval form of Gawain. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
Giuseppe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-ZEHP-peh
Rating: 36% based on 18 votes
Italian form of Joseph. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) was a military leader who united Italy in the 19th century.
Griffin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Rating: 56% based on 17 votes
Latinized form of Gruffudd. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρύψ (gryps).
Gustav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German, Czech
Pronounced: GUYS-tav(Swedish) GUWS-taf(German) GOOS-taf(Czech)
Rating: 36% based on 18 votes
Possibly means "staff of the Geats", derived from the Old Norse elements gautr "Geat, Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name Gostislav. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
Henrik
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Հենրիկ(Armenian)
Pronounced: HEHN-rik(Swedish, Norwegian, German) HEHN-rag(Danish) HEHN-reek(Hungarian) hehn-REEK(Armenian)
Rating: 55% based on 20 votes
Form of Heinrich (see Henry) in several languages. A famous bearer was the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906).
Hezekiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: חִזְקִיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: hehz-ə-KIE-ə(English)
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew name חִזְקִיָהוּ (Chizqiyahu), which means "Yahweh strengthens", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strength" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This name was borne by a powerful king of Judah who reigned in the 8th and 7th centuries BC. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of an ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah.
Hunter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUN-tər
Rating: 49% based on 18 votes
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
Irek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tatar, Bashkir
Other Scripts: Ирек(Tatar, Bashkir)
Pronounced: ee-RIK(Bashkir)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 18% based on 16 votes
Means "freedom, liberty" in Tatar and Bashkir, of Turkic origin.
Isaac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English) ee-sa-AK(Spanish)
Rating: 66% based on 21 votes
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

Ivan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian
Other Scripts: Иван(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Іван(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: i-VAN(Russian) ee-VAHN(Ukrainian) EE-van(Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene) I-van(Czech) IE-vən(English) ee-VAN(Romanian)
Rating: 41% based on 16 votes
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see John). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
Jack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 63% based on 20 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of John [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name Jacques [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

Jackson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-sən
Rating: 54% based on 17 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Jack". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
Jafar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: جعفر(Arabic, Persian)
Pronounced: JA‘-far(Arabic) ja-FAR(Persian)
Rating: 17% based on 16 votes
Means "stream" in Arabic. Jafar ibn Abi Talib was a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad who was killed fighting against Byzantium in the 7th century. Another notable bearer was Jafar al-Sadiq, the sixth Shia imam.
Jameson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYM-ə-sən
Rating: 44% based on 18 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Jared
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יָרֶד, יֶרֶד(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAR-əd(English)
Rating: 46% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series The Big Valley [1].
Jeremiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִרְמְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jehr-i-MIE-ə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 19 votes
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "Yahweh will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.

In England, though the vernacular form Jeremy had been occasionally used since the 13th century, the form Jeremiah was not common until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jeremy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JEHR-ə-mee(English) JEHR-mee(English)
Rating: 55% based on 17 votes
English form of Jeremiah, originally a medieval vernacular form. This is the spelling used in some English versions of the New Testament.
Jesse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
Rating: 61% based on 19 votes
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
Jonah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jordan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 58% based on 16 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name Jordanes, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

Josh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHSH
Rating: 36% based on 16 votes
Short form of Joshua.
Kyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIEL
Rating: 26% based on 16 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
Kyler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-lər
Rating: 19% based on 16 votes
Probably a variant of Kyle, blending it with Tyler. It also coincides with the rare surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler, which is of uncertain meaning.
Lando
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Personal remark: Nickname Lanny
Rating: 15% based on 17 votes
Italian form of Lanzo (see Lance).
Lannon
Usage: Irish
Personal remark: Nickname Lanny
Rating: 25% based on 17 votes
Variant of Lennon.
Lars
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Pronounced: LAHSH(Swedish, Norwegian) LAHS(Danish) LAHRS(Finnish) LARS(German)
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
Scandinavian form of Laurence 1.
Lawrence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əns
Rating: 56% based on 18 votes
Variant of Laurence 1. This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.
Leland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 34% based on 16 votes
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
Leo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Rating: 71% based on 23 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of Leon. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
Leon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λέων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-ahn(English) LEH-awn(German, Polish, Slovene)
Rating: 52% based on 20 votes
Derived from Greek λέων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
Levi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: לֵוִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-vie(English) LEH:-vee(Dutch)
Rating: 67% based on 20 votes
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. This name also occurs in the New Testament, where it is another name for the apostle Matthew.

As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

Liam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Pronounced: LEE-əm(English) LYAM(French)
Rating: 64% based on 19 votes
Irish short form of William. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017.
Lian 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Rating: 24% based on 16 votes
Short form of Julian or Kilian.
Linwood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-wuwd
Rating: 26% based on 17 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
Logan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən(English)
Rating: 41% based on 16 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
Lorenzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: lo-REHN-tso(Italian) lo-REHN-tho(European Spanish) lo-REHN-so(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 52% based on 20 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1). Lorenzo de' Medici (1449-1492), known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.
Louis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE(French) LOO-is(English) LOO-ee(English) loo-EE(Dutch)
Rating: 62% based on 18 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Ludwig. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote Treasure Island and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

Loy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 18% based on 19 votes
Transferred use of the surname Loy.
Lucas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Rating: 60% based on 21 votes
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see Luke), as well as the form used in several other languages.
Lyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIEL
Rating: 25% based on 16 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French l'isle "island".
Lyric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Rating: 21% based on 16 votes
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικός (lyrikos).
Lyron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare), Hebrew (Rare)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 21% based on 18 votes
Variant transcription of Liron.
Marek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovak, Estonian
Pronounced: MA-rehk(Polish, Czech, Slovak)
Rating: 39% based on 18 votes
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Mark.
Marlowe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 33% based on 17 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
Marshall
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-shəl
Rating: 35% based on 16 votes
From a surname that originally denoted a person who was a marshal. The word marshal originally derives from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant".
Matthew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MATH-yoo(English)
Rating: 58% based on 20 votes
English form of Ματθαῖος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of Yahweh", from the roots מַתָּן (mattan) meaning "gift" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first gospel in the New Testament. He is considered a saint in many Christian traditions. The variant Matthias also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a separate apostle. The name appears in the Old Testament as Mattithiah.

As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was the American naval officer Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858), who led a delegation to Japan. A famous modern bearer is American actor Matthew McConaughey (1969-).

Miles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
Rating: 54% based on 18 votes
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used as an Anglicized form of Maoilios.

Miloš
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Милош(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MI-losh(Czech) MEE-lawsh(Slovak) MEE-losh(Serbian, Croatian)
Rating: 36% based on 17 votes
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
Misha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Миша(Russian)
Pronounced: MYEE-shə
Rating: 37% based on 17 votes
Russian diminutive of Mikhail.
Morgan 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən(English) MAWR-GAN(French)
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
Myron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Μύρων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-rən(English) MUY-RAWN(Classical Greek)
Rating: 29% based on 16 votes
Derived from Greek μύρον (myron) meaning "sweet oil, perfume". Myron was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek sculptor. Saints bearing this name include a 3rd-century bishop of Crete and a 4th-century martyr from Cyzicus who was killed by a mob. These saints are more widely revered in the Eastern Church, and the name has generally been more common among Eastern Christians. As an English name, it has been used since the 19th century.
Nathaniel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: נְתַנְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: nə-THAN-yəl(English)
Rating: 78% based on 21 votes
Variant of Nathanael. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of The Scarlet Letter, was a famous bearer of this name.
Niles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIELZ
Rating: 28% based on 15 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Neil.
Noah 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: נֹחַ, נוֹחַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-ə(English) NO-a(German)
Rating: 63% based on 19 votes
From the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, repose", derived from the root נוּחַ (nuach). According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the Great Flood. After the flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans. In the United States it quickly increased in popularity beginning in the 1990s, eventually becoming the most popular name for boys between 2013 and 2016.

A famous bearer was the American lexicographer Noah Webster (1758-1843).

Nolan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 19 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of Nuallán". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
Octavian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Romanian
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ən(English)
Rating: 34% based on 17 votes
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name Octavius. After Gaius Octavius (later the Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.
Octavius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ok-TA-wee-oos(Latin) ahk-TAY-vee-əs(English)
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
Roman family name derived from Latin octavus meaning "eighth". This was the original family name of the emperor Augustus (born Gaius Octavius). It was also rarely used as a Roman praenomen, or given name.
Odin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Pronounced: O-din(English)
Rating: 34% based on 17 votes
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe, though he is best known from Norse sources.

In Norse mythology Odin is the highest of the gods, presiding over war, wisdom and death. He is the husband of Frigg and resides in Valhalla, where warriors go after they are slain. He is usually depicted as a one-eyed older man, carrying two ravens on his shoulders who inform him of all the events of the world. At the time of Ragnarök, the final battle, it is told that he will be killed fighting the great wolf Fenrir.

Osiris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ὄσιρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-SIE-ris(English)
Rating: 38% based on 17 votes
Greek form of the Egyptian wsjr (reconstructed as Asar, Usir and other forms), which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to wsr "mighty" or jrt "eye". In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.
Oswin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AHZ-win
Rating: 27% based on 17 votes
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman Conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Parker
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHR-kər
Rating: 51% based on 19 votes
From an English occupational surname that meant "keeper of the park".
Porter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-tər
Rating: 26% based on 17 votes
From an occupational English surname meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
Raimi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: Ray-me
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 28% based on 16 votes
Ramani
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tamil
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 26% based on 16 votes
Ramiro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ra-MEE-ro(Spanish) ra-MEE-roo(European Portuguese) ha-MEE-roo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 40% based on 18 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and mari "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
Ravi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Odia, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Other Scripts: रवि(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) রবি(Bengali) ରବି(Odia) રવિ(Gujarati) రవి(Telugu) ரவி(Tamil) ರವಿ(Kannada)
Pronounced: RAH-vee(English) RAW-bee(Bengali)
Rating: 49% based on 17 votes
Means "sun" in Sanskrit. Ravi is a Hindu god of the sun, sometimes equated with Surya. A famous bearer was the musician Ravi Shankar (1920-2012).
Reid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 48% based on 21 votes
From a surname, a Scots variant of Reed.
Rémi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: REH-MEE
Rating: 44% based on 17 votes
Variant of Rémy.
Remiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 32% based on 17 votes
Variant of Jeremiel appearing in some versions of the Old Testament.
Ridge
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIJ
Rating: 18% based on 18 votes
From the English vocabulary word denoting a continous elevated mountain crest, or from the English surname derived from the word.
Robin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English) RAW-BEHN(French) RAW-bin(Dutch) RO-bin(Czech)
Rating: 63% based on 19 votes
Medieval English diminutive of Robert, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
Romain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RAW-MEHN
Rating: 15% based on 17 votes
French form of Romanus (see Roman).
Ronal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 19% based on 16 votes
Ronaldo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 21% based on 17 votes
Portuguese form of Ronald. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
Ronan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, Irish, French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-nən(English)
Rating: 61% based on 21 votes
Breton and Anglicized form of Rónán.
Ross
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWS(English)
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
From a Scottish and English surname that originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
Rylan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lən
Rating: 25% based on 16 votes
Possibly a variant of Ryland, though it could also be an invented name inspired by other names like Ryan or Riley.
Sage
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Rating: 37% based on 17 votes
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
Sal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAL
Rating: 21% based on 16 votes
Short form of Sally, Salvador and other names beginning with Sal.
Sam 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: SAM(English)
Rating: 56% based on 18 votes
Short form of Samuel, Samson, Samantha and other names beginning with Sam. In J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) this is a short form of Samwise.
Saul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: שָׁאוּל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAWL(English)
Rating: 36% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew name שָׁאוּל (Sha'ul) meaning "asked for, prayed for". This was the name of the first king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. Before the end of his reign he lost favour with God, and after a defeat by the Philistines he was succeeded by David as king. In the New Testament, Saul was the original Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
Sawyer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
Rating: 43% based on 18 votes
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).
Sebastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Rating: 62% based on 24 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστός (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

Sergio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SEHR-jo(Italian) SEHR-khyo(Spanish)
Rating: 32% based on 17 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Sergius.
Seth 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת(Ancient Hebrew) Σήθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH(English)
Rating: 55% based on 19 votes
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Shane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAYN
Rating: 42% based on 18 votes
Anglicized form of Seán. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
Shannon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAN-ən
Personal remark: Nickname Shan
Rating: 31% based on 18 votes
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient" [1]. As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
Shaun
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAWN
Rating: 29% based on 18 votes
Anglicized form of Seán.
Shawn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAWN
Rating: 40% based on 18 votes
Anglicized form of Seán.
Sid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID
Rating: 36% based on 19 votes
Short form of Sidney.
Silas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σίλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Rating: 57% based on 21 votes
Probably a short form of Silvanus. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name Saul (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

Simon 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон(Macedonian) სიმონ(Georgian) Σίμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən(English) SEE-MAWN(French) SEE-mawn(Danish, Dutch) ZEE-mawn(German) SHEE-mon(Hungarian)
Rating: 53% based on 21 votes
From Σίμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεών, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name Simon 2.

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became more rare after the Protestant Reformation.

Spencer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEHN-sər
Rating: 49% based on 18 votes
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
Stanley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAN-lee
Rating: 28% based on 17 votes
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa. As a given name, it was borne by American director Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), as well as the character Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947).
Stellan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
Sylus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 21% based on 19 votes
Variant of Silas.
Tafari
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African (Rare), Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ተፈሪ(Amharic)
Rating: 23% based on 18 votes
Possibly means "he who inspires awe" in Amharic. This name was borne by Lij Tafari Makonnen (1892-1975), also known as Haile Selassie, the last emperor of Ethiopia. Rastafarians (Ras Tafari meaning "king Tafari") revere him as the earthly incarnation of God.
Tanner
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAN-ər
Rating: 29% based on 17 votes
From an English surname meaning "one who tans hides".
Theo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: THEE-o(English) TEH-o(German) TEH-yo(Dutch)
Rating: 71% based on 20 votes
Short form of Theodore, Theobald and other names that begin with Theo.
Theodore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Rating: 73% based on 24 votes
From the Greek name Θεόδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

Thomas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Θωμάς(Greek) Θωμᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs(American English) TAWM-əs(British English) TAW-MA(French) TO-mas(German) TO-mahs(Dutch) tho-MAHS(Greek)
Rating: 67% based on 23 votes
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') meaning "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. It was reliably among the top five most common English names for boys from the 13th to the 19th century, and it has remained consistently popular to this day.

Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

Tiras
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּירָס(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIE-rəs(English)
Rating: 29% based on 17 votes
Possibly means "desire" in Hebrew. Tiras is a grandson of Noah in the Old Testament.
Toshirō
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 敏郎, 敏朗, 敏良, 俊郎, 利郎, 聡朗, 年郎, 寿郎, 戸四郎, etc.(Japanese Kanji) としろう(Japanese Hiragana) トシロウ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: TO-SHEE-RO
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
From Toshi combined with a kanji, like 郎 meaning "son," 朗 meaning "cheerful" or 良 meaning "good."

One famous bearer of this name was actor Toshirō Mifune (三船 敏郎) (1920-1997).

Travis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAV-is
Rating: 42% based on 18 votes
From the English surname Travis (a variant of Travers). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
Ulric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: UWL-rik
Rating: 42% based on 17 votes
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf ruler". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of Ulrich.
Van
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAN
Rating: 24% based on 17 votes
Short form of names containing van, such as Vance or Ivan.
Walter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: WAWL-tər(English) VAL-tu(German) VAL-tehr(Swedish, Italian)
Rating: 46% based on 21 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
Warren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWR-ən
Rating: 38% based on 17 votes
From an English surname that was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
Wes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS
Rating: 34% based on 17 votes
Short form of Wesley.
Xavian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ZAY-vee-ən, ZAY-vee-awn, ig-ZAY-vee-ən
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 38% based on 19 votes
Derived from the name Xavier.
Xavier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər(English) ig-ZAY-vyər(English) GZA-VYEH(French) shu-vee-EHR(European Portuguese) sha-vee-EHR(Brazilian Portuguese) shə-bee-EH(Catalan)
Rating: 63% based on 22 votes
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was born in a village by this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
Yorick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, English, Dutch
Pronounced: YAWR-ik(English) YAW-rik(Dutch) YO-rik(Dutch)
Rating: 34% based on 20 votes
Altered form of Jørg. Shakespeare used this name for a deceased court jester in his play Hamlet (1600).
Zach
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAK
Rating: 33% based on 20 votes
Short form of Zachary.
Zachariah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: zak-ə-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 19 votes
Variant of Zechariah. This spelling is used in the King James Version of the Old Testament to refer to one of the kings of Israel (called Zechariah in other versions).
Zaire
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: ZIE-eer
Personal remark: User-submitted
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a truncation of the Kongo phrase nzadi o nzere meaning "river swallowing rivers". It is the former name of the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Zev
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זְאֵב(Hebrew)
Rating: 37% based on 19 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew זְאֵב (see Zeev).
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