guasguendi's Personal Name List

Aarón
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Biblical Spanish
Pronounced: a-RON(Spanish)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Aaron.
Abigaíl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-bee-gha-EEL
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Abigail.
Acorán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: a-koh-RAHN(Canarian Spanish)
Accented form of Acoran, used in modern times.
Adán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-DHAN
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Adam.
Adrián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Hungarian, Slovak
Pronounced: a-DHRYAN(Spanish) AWD-ree-an(Hungarian) AD-ree-an(Slovak)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Hungarian and Slovak form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian).
Adriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, Bulgarian, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Адриана(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-dree-A-na(Italian, Dutch) a-DHRYA-na(Spanish) a-DRYA-na(Polish) ay-dree-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Adrian.
Ágatha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
Portuguese Brazilian form of Agatha.
Akane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) あかね(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: A-KA-NEH
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (akane) meaning "deep red, dye from the rubia plant". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
Alba 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: AL-ba(Italian, Spanish) AL-bə(Catalan)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
This name is derived from two distinct names, Alba 2 and Alba 3, with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
Aldara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Galician form of the Visigothic name Hildiwara, which was composed of the Germanic elements hild "battle" and war "vigilant, cautious". This was the name of the mother of Saint Rosendo (10th century).
Alea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include an adoption of an obsolete German diminutive of Eulalia and an elaboration of the obsolote East Frisian name Ale.
Álex
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Short form of Alejandro.
Alexandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξάνδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian) Ἀλεξάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) AW-lehk-sawn-draw(Hungarian) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Alexander. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
Alexia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE-A(French) ə-LEHK-see-ə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Alexis.
Alexis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Greek, Spanish, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλέξης(Greek) Ἄλεξις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE(French) ə-LEHK-sis(English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Ἄλεξις (Alexis) meaning "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Ἀλέξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
Alicia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Swedish
Pronounced: a-LEE-thya(European Spanish) a-LEE-sya(Latin American Spanish) ə-LEE-shə(English) ə-LEE-see-ə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Alice.
Alina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, German, Italian
Other Scripts: Алина(Russian) Аліна(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: a-LEE-na(Romanian, German, Italian) a-LYEE-na(Polish)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Short form of Adelina, Albina and names that end in alina.
Aline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Pronounced: A-LEEN(French) a-LEE-nee(Portuguese) ə-LEEN(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Medieval short form of Adeline. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of Eileen. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
Alizée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEE-ZEH
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
From French alizé meaning "trade wind".
Allison
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-i-sən
From the middle of the 20th century this has primarily been used as a variant of the feminine name Alison. However, prior to that it was used as an uncommon masculine name, derived from the English and Scottish surname Allison.
Alma 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Albanian, Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: AL-mə(English) AL-ma(Spanish)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
Almudena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: al-moo-DHEH-na
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Derived from Arabic المدينة (al-mudaynah) meaning "the citadel". It was in a building by this name that a concealed statue of the Virgin Mary was discovered during the Reconquista in Madrid. The Virgin of Almudena, that is Mary, is the patron saint of Madrid.
Alondra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: a-LON-dra
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
Alonso
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-LON-so
Spanish variant of Alfonso.
Altair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
Álvaro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: AL-ba-ro(Spanish)
Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps Alfher. Verdi used this name in his opera The Force of Destiny (1862).
Amalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Other Scripts: Αμαλία(Greek)
Pronounced: a-MA-lya(Spanish, German) ah-MAH-lee-ah(Dutch)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
Amanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ə-MAN-də(English) a-MAN-da(Spanish, Italian)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
In part this is a feminine form of Amandus. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play Love's Last Shift (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
Amara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Amaro.
Amarilis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: a-ma-REE-lees
Spanish form of Amaryllis.
Amaro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: a-MA-ro(Spanish)
Possibly from the Germanic name Adelmar, maybe influenced by Latin amarus "bitter". This was the name of a legendary saint who was said to have sailed across the Atlantic to a paradise. He is especially popular in Galicia and Asturias in Spain.
Ámbar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern)
Pronounced: AM-bar
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish cognate of Amber.
Amelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian) an-MEH-lya(Polish)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Variant of Amalia, though it is sometimes confused with Emilia, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

Amélie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-LEE
Rating: 76% based on 5 votes
French form of Amelia.
Amira 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أميرة(Arabic)
Pronounced: a-MEE-rah
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Alternate transcription of Arabic أميرة (see Amirah).
Amparo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: am-PA-ro
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "protection, shelter, refuge" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Amparo, meaning "Our Lady of Refuge".
Amra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Arabic عَمَرَ (ʿamara) meaning "to live long, to be long-lived".
Amy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
Ana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, Fijian, Tongan
Other Scripts: Ана(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) ანა(Georgian)
Pronounced: A-na(Spanish, Romanian) U-nu(Portuguese) AH-NAH(Georgian)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Form of Anna used in various languages.
Anabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-na-BEHL
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Annabel.
Anabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Annabel.
Anaïs
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES(French)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Occitan and Catalan form of Anna.
Ander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: AN-dehr
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Andreas (see Andrew).
Ángel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ANG-khehl
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Angelus (see Angel).
Ángela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ANG-kheh-la
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish feminine form of Angelus (see Angel).
Angélica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ang-KHEH-lee-ka(Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Angelica.
Ania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Asturian, Spanish
Pronounced: A-nya
Asturian form of Ana.
Annabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Annabel. It can also be taken as a combination of Anna and Belle.
Antía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: an-TEE-a
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Galician feminine form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Apolo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Brazilian
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Apollo.
Arabela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Spanish (Latin American), Filipino, Romanian, Polish (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian), German (Bessarabian)
Spanish and Romanian form and Polish variant of Arabella.
Arabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of Annabel. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable, yielding to prayer".
Araceli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
Ares
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: A-rəs
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Catalan Mare de Déu de les Ares ("Mother of God of the Ares"), which is the name of a sanctuary located on Coll d'Ares, a Catalan mountain pass in the Pyrenees. It is the site of a Marian devotion, which is why Catalan parents bestow this name upon their daughters.
Ariana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ar-ee-AN-ə(English) ar-ee-AHN-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Portuguese form of Ariadne.
Arianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: a-RYAN-na(Italian) ar-ee-AN-ə(English) ar-ee-AHN-ə(English)
Italian form of Ariadne.
Arlette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AR-LEHT
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French form of Herleva.
Arlo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-lo
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
Arminda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Filipino, Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Ermanno.

As a Canarian Spanish name, this may also be taken as a Spanish alteration of Guayarmina.

Astor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tər
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
Astra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
Astrid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Modern form of Ástríðr. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
Atenea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Asturian
Pronounced: ah-te-NAY-ah(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Athena.
Atteneri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Guanche name meaning "here is the beautiful young woman", derived from the Guanche demonstrative *hata and *teneriht "gazelle", used here to mean "beautiful girl". This was recorded as the name of a 10-year-old Guanche girl from the island of Tenerife (present-day Canary Islands, Spain) who was sold at the slave market in Valencia in 1495. In the modern era this name has been (rarely) used in the Canary Islands since the 1970s.
Audrey
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AWD-ree(English) O-DREH(French)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Medieval diminutive of Æðelþryð. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
Aurora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
Avril
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: A-VREEL(French) AV-ril(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
French form of April.
Axel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German, French, English
Pronounced: A-ksehl(Swedish) A-ksəl(German) A-KSEHL(French) AK-səl(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Medieval Danish form of Absalom.
Ayumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 亜由美, 歩, etc.(Japanese Kanji) あゆみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: A-YOO-MEE
From Japanese (ayumi) meaning "walk, step". It can also be from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (yu) meaning "reason, cause" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Otherwise it can be written with different combinations of kanji, or with the hiragana writing system.
Azalea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the name of the flower (shrubs of the genus Rhododendron), ultimately derived from Greek ἀζαλέος (azaleos) meaning "dry".
Azazel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲזָאזֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "scapegoat" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this is the name of the recipient of a sacrificial goat. The identity of Azazel is not clear; it may in fact be the name of the place where the goat is to be sacrificed, or it may be the name of some sort of evil desert demon.
Azucena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-thoo-THEH-na(European Spanish) a-soo-SEH-na(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
Beatriz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: beh-a-TREETH(European Spanish) beh-a-TREES(Latin American Spanish, Portuguese) beh-a-TREESH(Portuguese)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Beatrix.
Begoña
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Basque
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Begoña, meaning "Our Lady of Begoña", the patron saint of Biscay, Spain. Begoña is a district and basilica in the city of Bilbao.
Bianca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka(Italian) BYAN-ka(Romanian)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Italian cognate of Blanche. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in Taming of the Shrew (1593) and Othello (1603).
Blanche
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BLAHNSH(French) BLANCH(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
Borja
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: BOR-kha
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a Spanish surname, used as a given name in honour of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Borja (1510-1572). The surname, also spelled Borgia, is derived from the name of a Spanish town, ultimately from Arabic بُرْج (burj) meaning "tower".
Bosco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: BOH-sko
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Bosco borne by the catholic saint John Bosco (also known as Don Bosco).
Brais
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: BRIES
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Galician form of Blaise.
Brandon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-dən
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of Brendan.
Brayan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Modern)
Pronounced: BRA-yan
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Brian.
Brendan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, Breton
Pronounced: BREHN-dən(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
Brianda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Jewish, Medieval Catalan, Judeo-Catalan (Archaic), Medieval Italian, Spanish (Mexican), Spanish (Caribbean), Dutch (Rare), Galician
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Not available.
Brigitte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: bree-GI-tə(German) BREE-ZHEET(French)
German and French form of Bridget.
Byron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIE-rən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of Don Juan and many other works.
Camelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: ka-MEH-lee-a
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see Camellia).
Camila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ka-MEE-la(Spanish)
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Camilla.
Candela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kan-DEH-la
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Short form of Candelaria.
Candelaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kan-deh-LA-rya
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
Carla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: KAR-la(Italian, Spanish, German) KAHR-lə(English) KAHR-lah(Dutch)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Carlo, Carlos or Carl.
Carlota
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kar-LO-ta(Spanish)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Charlotte.
Carmen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Medieval Spanish form of Carmel influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
Carolina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Latinate feminine form of Carolus. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
Casandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Romanian
Pronounced: ka-SAN-dra(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Romanian form of Cassandra.
Catalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Corsican
Pronounced: ka-ta-LEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Corsican form of Katherine.
Caterina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: ka-teh-REE-na(Italian) kə-tə-REE-nə(Catalan)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Italian and Catalan form of Katherine.
Cathaysa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Allegedly means "beautiful (big) daisy" in the Guanche language. Recorded as the name of a 7-year-old Guanche girl who was sold as a slave in Valencia in 1494. Cathaysa is also the title of a song recorded by singer Pedro Guerra in the 1980s.
Catrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Filipino
Pronounced: ka-TREE-na(Latin American Spanish, Filipino)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Either a Spanish form of Katrina or taken from the Spanish word catrina "elegant".
Cayetana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kie-eh-TA-na
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Spanish feminine form of Caietanus (see Gaetano).
Cédric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-DREEK
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
French form of Cedric.
Celeste
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Italian feminine and masculine form of Caelestis. It is also the English feminine form.
Christian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS-chən(English) KRISH-chən(English) KREES-TYAHN(French) KRIS-tyan(German) KRIS-ti-an(Swedish, Norwegian) KREHS-dyan(Danish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see Christos 1). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as The Ugly Duckling and The Emperor's New Clothes.
Claire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French form of Clara.
Clara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
Clarisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kla-REE-sa
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Clarissa.
Claudia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Latin)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Claudius. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
Cora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κόρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Kore. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of Cordula, Corinna and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Coral
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: KAWR-əl(English) ko-RAL(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοράλλιον (korallion).
Cristal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: krees-TAL
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Crystal.
Dácil
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
The name of a Guanche princess of Tenerife who lived during the 15th century. She is best known for her marriage to a Spanish conqueror of the island. According to the scholar Ignacio Reyes García, the name means "footprint, step" in the Guanche language.
Daida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Guanche *dăyda meaning "newborn lamb that is still being suckled by its mother". This name was listed in a baptismal register from Seville dating to the 15th century; the sex and age of the bearer were not recorded. Since the 1970s it has been (rarely) used as a feminine name in the Canary Islands.
Dakota
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the name of the Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley, or from the two American states that were named for them: North and South Dakota (until 1889 unified as the Dakota Territory). The tribal name means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language.
Dalia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Arabic
Other Scripts: داليا(Arabic)
Pronounced: DA-lya(Spanish) DA-lee-ya(Arabic)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Arabic form of Dahlia. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
Dámaris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Damaris.
Dana 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew
Other Scripts: דָּנָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: DA-na(Czech, Slovak, German)
Feminine form of Daniel or Dan 1.
Dara 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer
Other Scripts: ដរា(Khmer)
Pronounced: dah-RAH
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "star" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
Darío
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: da-REE-o
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Darius.
Déborah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEH-BAW-RA
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French variant form of Deborah.
Delilah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
Derek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of Theodoric. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.
Desirée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German, Afrikaans, South African
Pronounced: day-si-RAY(Dutch) de-si-REE(Swedish) de-si-REH(Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German) dye-si-REE(Afrikaans, South African)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Désirée / Desiree.
Deva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Asturian, Galician, Spanish (Modern), Celtic Mythology
Pronounced: DEH-va(Asturian, Galician, Spanish) DEE-va(Celtic Mythology)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the name of a river that flows through Asturias. It was named after Deva, the Celtic goddess of waters. Her name is derived from Celtic deva "goddess" or "divine", itself derived from Proto-Celtic *dēwā “goddess”.
Diandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English, Various
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
A blend of the name Diana with Alexandra or Sandra. A well-known bearer of this name is Diandra Luker, the ex-wife of actor Michael Douglas.
Diego
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: DYEH-gho
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Possibly a shortened form of Santiago. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχή (didache) meaning "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).
Dina 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Latvian, Russian, Dutch, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Дина(Russian) Δίνα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DYEE-nə(Russian) DEE-nah(Dutch)
Variant of Dinah, and also the form used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Dorian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Romanian
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.
Duarte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: doo-AR-ti(European Portuguese) doo-ART(European Portuguese) doo-AKH-chee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Portuguese form of Edward. This name was borne by a 15th-century king of Portugal, who was named after his maternal ancestor Edward III of England.
Dulce
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: DOOL-theh(European Spanish) DOOL-seh(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "sweet" or "candy" in Spanish.
Dulcia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Judeo-Catalan (Latinized), Gascon
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Dulcie, used particularly in Iberian countries. As a Jewish name, Dulcia was occasionally used as a translation of Naomi in former times.
Dunia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Spanish, Galician
Other Scripts: دُنْيا(Arabic)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from Arabic dunya "world; life".
Dylan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an(Welsh) DIL-ən(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series Beverly Hills 90210.

Echedey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Guanche ⵂⴻⴷⴻⵢ ‎(ehedey), from *ezădăy meaning either "to unite, join, reconcile" or "to know, recognize". Echedey or Ehedey was a mid-15th century mencey (aboriginal leader) of the kingdom of Tihuya on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain).
Edgar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, German
Pronounced: EHD-gər(English) EHD-GAR(French)
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton [1]. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
Edurne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: eh-DHOOR-neh
Means "snow" in Basque, from edur, a variant of elur "snow". It is a Basque equivalent of Nieves.
Electra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἠλέκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEHK-trə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Greek Ἠλέκτρα (Elektra), derived from ἤλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
Elia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Elio.
Eliana 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English (Modern)
Pronounced: eh-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Éliane.
Elías
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Icelandic
Pronounced: eh-LEE-as(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Spanish and Icelandic form of Elijah.
Elisabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), French (Rare), Medieval Provençal
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Old Provençal form of Elisabeth (see also Elyzabel).
Elizabeth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

Eloísa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-lo-EE-sa
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Spanish form of Eloise.
Emma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish) EHM-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's 1709 poem Henry and Emma [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

Enzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHN-tso
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of Heinz, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name Anzo. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as Vincenzo or Lorenzo.
Eric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, German, Spanish
Pronounced: EHR-ik(English) EH-rik(Swedish, German) EH-reek(Spanish)
Means "ever ruler", from the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler, mighty". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

This common Norse name was first brought to England by Danish settlers during the Anglo-Saxon period. It was not popular in England in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, in part due to the children's novel Eric, or Little by Little (1858) by Frederic William Farrar.

Erick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHR-ik
Variant of Eric.
Érika
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Portuguese form of Erica.
Esmeralda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
Esperanza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-peh-RAN-tha(European Spanish) ehs-peh-RAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
Estefanía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-teh-fa-NEE-a
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Spanish feminine form of Stephen.
Estela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-TEH-la(Spanish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Portuguese and Spanish form of Estelle.
Estelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL(English) EHS-TEHL(French)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From an Old French name meaning "star", ultimately derived from Latin stella. It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
Esther
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Ἐσθήρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess Ishtar. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

Estrella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-TREH-ya
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Stella 1, coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
Eva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Romanian, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εύα(Greek) Ева(Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic) ევა(Georgian)
Pronounced: EH-ba(Spanish) EH-va(Italian, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Icelandic, Greek) EE-və(English) EH-fa(German) EH-vah(Danish) YEH-və(Russian) EH-VAH(Georgian) EH-wa(Latin)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Form of Eve used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

This is also an alternate transcription of Russian Ева (see Yeva).

Evelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-BEH-lya
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of Eva.
Evelyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Aveline. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
Fabián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: fa-BYAN
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Fabianus (see Fabian).
Fabio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: FA-byo
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian and Spanish form of Fabius.
Fara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Galician (Rare)
Other Scripts: فرح(Arabic)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant transcription of Farah.
Fátima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: FA-tee-mu(European Portuguese) FA-chee-mu(Brazilian Portuguese) FA-tee-ma(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the name of a town in Portugal, which was derived from the Arabic feminine name Fatimah, apparently after a Moorish princess who converted to Christianity during the Reconquista. The town became an important Christian pilgrimage center after 1917 when three local children reported witnessing repeated apparitions of the Virgin Mary.
Fayna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Guanche *fāh-inaɣ meaning "our light". According to Juan de Abréu Galindo's Historia de la conquista de las siete islas Canarias (published 1632), this was the name of the wife of Zonzamas, a Guanche king on the island of Lanzarote. She was the mother of Princess Ico by a Biscayan privateer named Martín Ruíz de Avendaño, who took shelter on Lanzarote in 1377 and slept with the queen during his stay (supposedly a customary act of hospitality in local Guanche culture).
Fedra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian, Italian, Sicilian, Portuguese, Spanish, Croatian (Rare), Galician
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Bosnian, Croatian, Italian, Galician, Portuguese and Spanish form of Phaedra.
Félix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: FEH-LEEKS(French) FEH-leeks(Spanish, Portuguese)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of Felix.
Ferrer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
From a surname that meant "blacksmith" in Catalan. This name is often given in honour of Saint Vicente Ferrer, a 14th-century missionary who is the patron saint of builders.
Fiama
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: FYA-ma(Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Fiamma.
Fleur
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR(French, Dutch) FLUR(English)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
Flora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, French, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(Spanish, German) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
Francelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Caribbean), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: fran-SEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Likely an elaboration of Frances influenced by Celia.
Francesca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: fran-CHEHS-ka(Italian) frən-SEHS-kə(Catalan)
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see Francis).
Frida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FREE-dah(Swedish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
Froilán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Galician
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish derivative of Froila, a Visigothic name probably derived from Germanic *frau "lord" (Gothic frauja "lord"; compare Freyr) and the Gothic name suffix *ila. This was the name of a 9th-century saint.
Gabriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

Gael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, English (Modern), Spanish (Modern)
Pronounced: GAYL(English)
Probably from the ethno-linguistic term Gael, which refers to speakers of Gaelic languages.
Gala 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: GA-la
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Spanish feminine form of Gallus.
Gara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: GAH-ra(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from Guanche *gar "height", and taken from place name Garajonay. According to an unattested local legend, Gara and Jonay were a pair of young Guanche lovers who died together in a joint suicide at Garajonay peak.
Gazmira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: gaz-MI-ra(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From Guanche *gazmir, meaning "reed".
Gema
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: KHEH-ma
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Gemma.
Génesis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern)
Pronounced: KHEH-neh-sees
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Genesis.
Genoveva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kheh-no-BEH-ba(Spanish) zhə-noo-VEH-və(Portuguese)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Geneviève.
Georgina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Hungarian
Pronounced: jawr-JEE-nə(English) kheh-or-KHEE-na(Spanish) GEH-or-gee-naw(Hungarian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of George.
Giada
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Italian form of Jade.
Gina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: JEE-na(Italian) JEE-nə(English)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Short form of Georgina, Regina, Luigina and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of Virginia or Eugenia. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
Giovani
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Archaic), English, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Archaic Italian and English variant of Giovanni as well as the Spanish and Portuguese form of Giovanni.

Known bearers of this name include the American football player Giovani Bernard (b. 1991), the Mexican soccer player Giovani "Gio" dos Santos (b. 1989), the Argentine soccer player Giovani Lo Celso (b. 1996) and the Brazilian soccer player Giovani Rosa (b. 1992).

Giovany
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Hispanic, Modern), Spanish (Latin American, Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare), French (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Giovanni.
Giselle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEHL(French) ji-ZEHL(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
Gladys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GLAD-is(English)
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad meaning "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of Claudia. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel Puck (1870).
Gonzalo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: gon-THA-lo(European Spanish) gon-SA-lo(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the medieval name Gundisalvus, which was the Latin form of a Germanic name composed of gund meaning "war" and a second element of unknown meaning (with the spelling influenced by Latin salvus "safe"). Saint Gonzalo was an 11th-century bishop of Mondoñedo in Galicia, Spain.
Goretti
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the surname of Maria Goretti, a 20th-century Italian saint who forgave her murderer on her deathbed. Her surname was derived from the given name Gregorio.
Greta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: GREH-ta(German, Italian, Swedish, Polish) GREHT-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Short form of Margareta. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
Grimanesa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Medieval Portuguese, Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Borne by an illegitimate granddaughter of Bartolomé Herrero, the first colonial alcalde of the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife on the island of Tenerife (who had been appointed to the position in 1501 by the conquistador Alonso Fernández de Lugo), in whose case it possibly meant "forced" from Guanche *gərma-ənsa, literally "forced to spend the night". This name was also borne by a sister of the 16th-century Spanish inquisitor and saint Turibius of Mogrovejo. It occurs in the novel Amadis of Gaul (published in 1508; written in the 14th century by an unknown author, and edited and expanded by Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo) belonging to the lover of the prince Apolidon.
Guacimara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
This name may come from Guanche masculine agent noun *wazimar meaning "strong, sturdy, powerful, able."

Canarian historian, doctor and poet Antonio de Viana (1578-1650?) used this name in his poet epic, Antigüedades de las Islas Afortunadas (published in 1604), referring to the daughter of the king (mencey) of Anaga (on the island of Tenerife) who was assumed to go by this name.

Gwen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEHN
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of Gwendolen, Gwenllian and other names beginning with Gwen.
Gwendoline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), French
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English) GWEHN-DAW-LEEN(French)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant of Gwendolen.
Haizea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ie-SEH-a
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "wind" in Basque.
Haydée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, French (Rare)
Pronounced: ie-DEH(Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Spanish and French form of Haidee, from Lord Byron's Don Juan (1819). It was later used by Alexander Dumas for a character in The Count of Monte Cristo (1844).
Héctor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: EHK-tor
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Hector.
Henar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-NAHR
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "hayfield" in Spanish. It is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de El Henar, meaning "Our Lady of the Hayfield".
Hiurma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
This name was listed in a baptismal register from Seville dating to the 15th century. It is said to derive from Guanche yurma meaning "white pupil (leukocoria)", literally "moon of the pupil" from *hăyyūr "moon" and *əmma "pupil".
Hugo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-goo(Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Hugh. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame and Les Misérables.
Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Scottish form of John.
Ibai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-BIE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "river" in Basque.
Ida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Slovak, Slovene, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: IE-də(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Dutch, Italian, Polish) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish) EE-daw(Hungarian)
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

Idaira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern), Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
This was allegedly the name of a Guanche princess from the Canarian island of La Palma. It has perhaps been popularized in the Spanish-speaking world by the Canarian-born Spanish singer simply known as Idaira (1985-).
Idalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1], Greek Mythology, Polish (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ἰδαλία(Ancient Greek)
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element idal, an extended form of id meaning "work, labour" [1]. Unrelated, this was also an epithet of the Greek goddess Aphrodite, given because the city of Idalion on Cyprus was a center of her cult.

This name was borne by the heroine of Polish writer Juliusz Słowacki's play Fantazy (1841, published 1866).

Idoya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-DHOI-a
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant of Idoia.
Igor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovak, Czech, Italian, Portuguese
Other Scripts: Игорь(Russian) Игор(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: EE-gər(Russian) EE-gawr(Polish, Slovak) EE-gor(Croatian, Serbian, Italian) I-gor(Czech)
Russian form of Yngvarr (see Ingvar). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two grand princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is The Rite of Spring, and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.
Iker
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-KEHR
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "visitation" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Visitación.
Ilana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אִילָנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Ilan.
Ilona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, German, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Pronounced: EE-lo-naw(Hungarian) ee-LO-na(German) EE-lo-nah(Finnish) ee-LAW-na(Polish) I-lo-na(Czech)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of Helen. In Finland it is associated with the word ilona, a derivative of ilo "joy".
Imelda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ee-MEHL-da
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian and Spanish form of Irmhild. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
Imogen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
The name of a princess in the play Cymbeline (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden". As a given name it is chiefly British and Australian.
Indira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा(Sanskrit) इन्दिरा, इंदिरा(Hindi) इंदिरा(Marathi) ಇಂದಿರಾ(Kannada) இந்திரா(Tamil)
Pronounced: IN-di-ra(Hindi)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).
Inés
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ee-NEHS
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Agnes.
Ingrid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
Ion 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque, Romanian
Pronounced: YON(Basque) ee-ON(Romanian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Basque and Romanian form of John.
Irati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-RA-tee
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Means "fern field" in Basque.
Irene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εἰρήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-REEN(English) ie-REE-nee(English) ee-REH-neh(Italian, Spanish) EE-reh-neh(Finnish) ee-REH-nə(German, Dutch)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From Greek Εἰρήνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the Ὥραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.

This name has traditionally been more popular among Eastern Christians. In the English-speaking world it was not regularly used until the 19th century.

Iria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Galician
Pronounced: EE-ryu(Galician)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Possibly a Portuguese and Galician form of Irene. This was the name of a 7th-century saint (also known as Irene) from Tomar in Portugal. This is also the name of an ancient town in Galicia (now a district of Padrón).
Iris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 88% based on 5 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
Irma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian, Slovene, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: ირმა(Georgian)
Pronounced: IR-ma(German) UR-mə(English) EER-mah(Finnish) EER-ma(Spanish) EER-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to Emma. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
Isaac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English) ee-sa-AK(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

Isabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL(Spanish) ee-zu-BEHL(European Portuguese) ee-za-BEW(Brazilian Portuguese) IZ-ə-behl(English) EE-ZA-BEHL(French) ee-za-BEHL(German, Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Medieval Occitan form of Elizabeth. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

Iselda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian variant of Isolda.
Isidro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ee-SEE-dhro
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish variant of Isidore.
Israel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, English, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: יִשְׂרָאֵל(Hebrew) Ἰσραήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IZ-ray-əl(English) IZ-ree-əl(English) eez-ra-EHL(Spanish)
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contends", from the roots שָׂרָה (sarah) meaning "to contend, to fight" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament, Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
Ithaysa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: i-TIE-sa(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ithaisa.
Itzel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mayan
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Mayan itz meaning "dew, nectar, fluid". Otherwise, it might be a variant of Ixchel.
Iván
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Hungarian
Pronounced: ee-BAN(Spanish) EE-van(Hungarian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Hungarian form of Ivan.
Ivor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
Pronounced: IE-vawr(English) EE-vawr(English)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
Ixchel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology, Indigenous American, Mayan
Pronounced: eesh-CHEHL(Mayan)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. Ixchel was the Maya goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
Jacobo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-KO-bo
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Iacobus, the New Testament Latin form of James. The apostles are also commonly denoted Santiago in Spanish.
Jaime 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: KHIE-meh(Spanish) ZHIE-mi(European Portuguese) ZHIEM(European Portuguese) ZHIE-mee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Iacomus (see James).
Jana 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan, Estonian, Latvian
Pronounced: YA-na(Czech, Slovak, German) YAH-nah(Dutch) ZHA-nə(Catalan)
Feminine form of Jan 1.
Jara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Directly taken from Spanish jara "rockrose".
Javier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-BYEHR
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Spanish form of Xavier.
Jazmín
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khaz-MEEN
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Jasmine.
Jennifer
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-i-fər(English) JEH-ni-fu(German)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see Guinevere). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma (1906). It barely ranked in the United until the late 1930s, when it began steadily growing in popularity, accelerating into the early 1970s. It was the most popular name for girls in America between 1970 and 1984, though it was not as common in the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include actress Jennifer Aniston (1969-) and singer/actress Jennifer Lopez (1969-).

Jessica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHS-i-kə(English) ZHEH-SEE-KA(French) YEH-see-ka(German, Dutch) YEHS-si-ka(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name Iscah, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. It reached its peak of popularity in the United States in 1987, and was the top ranked name for girls between 1985 and 1995, excepting 1991 and 1992 (when it was unseated by Ashley). Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
Jimena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-MEH-na
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Variant of Ximena.
Jocelyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAHS-lin(English) JAHS-ə-lin(English) ZHO-SEH-LEHN(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Geats or Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
Joel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "Yahweh is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
Johana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: YO-ha-na(Czech)
Czech form of Iohanna (see Joanna). This form is also used in Spanish-speaking Latin America.
Jonay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian), Folklore
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Taken from Garajonay, a Canarian place name of Guanche origin. According to a local legend, Gara and Jonay were a pair of young Guanche lovers who died together in a joint suicide at Garajonay peak, the highest mountain on the Canarian island of La Gomera. The tale of Gara and Jonay was first recorded in 1924, and its authenticity has been called into question.
Jordan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name Jordanes, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

Jovany
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: Joh-VAHN-Ee(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Giovanni, primarily used by English and Spanish speakers.
Judith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-dith(English) YOO-dit(German) khoo-DHEET(Spanish) ZHUY-DEET(French)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.

As an English name it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, despite a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages. It was however used earlier on the European continent, being borne by several European royals, such as the 9th-century Judith of Bavaria.

Juliet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Anglicized form of Juliette or Giulietta. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Kahina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Northern African, Berber
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Arabic الكاهِنة (al-Kahinah) meaning "the diviner, the fortuneteller". This was a title applied to the 7th-century Berber queen Dihya, who resisted the Arab expansion into North Africa.
Kala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAH-la
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Calla.
Kaori
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 香, 香織, etc.(Japanese Kanji) かおり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KA-O-REE
From Japanese (kaori) meaning "fragrance". It can also come from an alternate reading of (ka) combined with (ori) meaning "weaving". Other kanji combinations are possible. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Karen 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, English, German
Pronounced: KAH-rehn(Danish) KAR-ən(English) KEHR-ən(English) KA-rən(German)
Danish short form of Katherine. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
Karina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Polish, German, Russian, English, Latvian
Other Scripts: Карина(Russian)
Pronounced: ka-REE-na(Swedish, German) ka-RYEE-na(Polish) ku-RYEE-nə(Russian) kə-REE-nə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of Karin.
Karla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian
Pronounced: KAR-la(German, Czech)
German, Scandinavian, Czech and Croatian feminine form of Charles.
Katalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Medieval Galician, Medieval Occitan, Greek (Cypriot, Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant and cognate of Catalina as well as a Hungarian elaboration of Katalin.
Katia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Катя(Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: KA-tya(Italian) KA-tyə(Russian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian diminutive of Caterina, as well as an alternate transcription of Cyrillic Катя (see Katya).
Keila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lə
Variant of Kayla.
Kenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-yə, KEN-ee-ə, KEEN-ee-ə, KEEN-yə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Either a variant of Kenya or a contracted form of Kenina.
Kenzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese, French (Modern)
Other Scripts: 謙三, 健三, 賢三(Japanese Kanji) けんぞう(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KEWN-ZO(Japanese)
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 謙三 or 健三 or 賢三 (see Kenzō). Use of the name in France can probably be attributed to the fashion brand Kenzo, founded in 1970 by the Japanese-French designer Kenzō Takada (1939-).
Kevin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Pronounced: KEHV-in(English) KEH-VEEN(French) KEH-vin(German)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "handsome birth", derived from the older Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: kee-AHR-ə
Variant of Ciara 1 or Chiara. This name was brought to public attention in 1988 after the singing duo Kiara released their song This Time. It was further popularized by a character in the animated movie The Lion King II (1998).
Killian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Anglicized variant of Cillian, also used in France.
Kira 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Кира(Russian) Кіра(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: KYEE-rə(Russian)
Russian feminine form of Cyrus.
Kyara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese
Pronounced: Ky-Are-a(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Kiara.
Lara 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Лара(Russian)
Pronounced: LAHR-ə(English) LA-ra(German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch) LA-RA(French) LA-ru(Portuguese) LAW-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Russian short form of Larisa. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
Laura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch) LOW-ru(Portuguese) LOW-rə(Catalan) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the Little House on the Prairie series of novels.

Lázaro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LA-tha-ro(European Spanish) LA-sa-ro(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Lazarus.
Leila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Arabic, Kurdish, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: لیلا(Persian) ليلى(Arabic) لەیلا(Kurdish Sorani) ლეილა(Georgian)
Pronounced: lay-LAW(Persian) LIE-la(Arabic) LAY-lə(English) LEE-lə(English) LIE-lə(English)
Variant of Layla, and the usual Persian transcription.

This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in The Giaour (1813) and Don Juan (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

Lena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена(Russian) Λένα(Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-na(Swedish, German, Polish, Italian) LYEH-nə(Russian) LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Short form of names ending in lena, such as Helena, Magdalena or Yelena.
Leo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of Leon. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
León
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: leh-ON
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Leon. This is also the name of a city and province in Spain (see León), though the etymology is unrelated.
Leona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(Czech)
Feminine form of Leon.
Leonor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: leh-o-NOR(Spanish) leh-oo-NOR(European Portuguese) leh-o-NOKH(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Eleanor. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married King Alfonso VIII of Castile.
Lía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: LEE-a
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Galician form of Leah.
Liam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Pronounced: LEE-əm(English) LYAM(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Irish short form of William. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017.
Lidia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian
Pronounced: LYEE-dya(Polish) LEE-dya(Italian) LEE-dhya(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Polish, Italian, Spanish and Romanian form of Lydia.
Lilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LEE-lya(Spanish) LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Italian form of Lily, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see Liliya).
Liliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Latinate form of Lillian.
Lilith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Lina 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, French, Lithuanian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Slovene
Pronounced: LEE-nə(English) LEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of names ending in lina.
Linda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də(English) LIN-da(German, Dutch, Czech) LEEN-da(Italian) LEEN-DA(French) LEEN-dah(Finnish) LEEN-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
Liora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Strictly feminine form of Lior.
Lluvia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern), Spanish (Mexican), American (Hispanic)
Pronounced: LYOO-bya(European Spanish) JYOO-bya(Latin American Spanish) YOO-bya(Latin American Spanish)
From Spanish lluvia meaning "rain."
Lola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: LO-la(Spanish) LO-lə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of Dolores.
Lorelei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
Lorena 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Pronounced: lo-REH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of Lorraine.
Lorenzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: lo-REHN-tso(Italian) lo-REHN-tho(European Spanish) lo-REHN-so(Latin American Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1). Lorenzo de' Medici (1449-1492), known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.
Lorién
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Aragonese
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Lorient.
Lorna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-nə
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Created by the author R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel Lorna Doone (1869), set in southern England, which describes the dangerous love between John Ridd and Lorna Doone. Blackmore may have based the name on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title Marquis of Lorne (see Lorne).
Lucas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see Luke), as well as the form used in several other languages.
Lucía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: loo-THEE-a(European Spanish) loo-SEE-a(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Lucia. This is the most popular name for girls in Spain beginning in 2003.
Lucrecia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Galician
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Galician form of Lucretia.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lylia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern), English (British)
Pronounced: LEEL-YAH(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Lilia that is used in France in modern times.
Mabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Medieval feminine form of Amabilis. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's 1854 novel The Heir of Redclyffe [1], which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).
Madaya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Archaic), Hausa (Archaic), Berber (Archaic)
Pronounced: ma-DAH-ya(Canarian Spanish, Hausa, Berber)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Guanche *madăyya, meaning "beautiful thing to see". Besides the Canary Islands, this name was also used in Northern Africa.
Maeva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
Magalí
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Provençal, Gascon, Catalan
Pronounced: ma-ga-LEE(Provençal, Gascon)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Provençal, Gascon and Catalan form of Magali.
Magdalena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian, Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, English
Other Scripts: Магдалена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: mag-da-LEH-na(Polish) mak-da-LEH-na(German) magh-dha-LEH-na(Spanish) məg-də-LEH-nə(Catalan) MAG-da-leh-na(Czech) mag-də-LAY-nə(English)
Latinate form of Magdalene.
Maite 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: MIE-teh
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "lovable" in Basque.
Malena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: ma-LEH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Swedish and Spanish short form of Magdalena.
Malina 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish
Other Scripts: Малина(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: ma-LYEE-na(Polish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "raspberry" in several Slavic languages.
Mar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: MAR
Means "sea" in Spanish and Catalan. It is from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Mar.
Mara 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָרָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAHR-ə(English) MAR-ə(English) MEHR-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).
Marco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MAR-ko(Italian, Spanish, German) MAR-koo(European Portuguese) MAKH-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) MAHR-ko(Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Italian form of Marcus (see Mark). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
Margaret
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

Margot
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French short form of Margaret.
María
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Galician, Icelandic
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Spanish) MA-ree-ya(Icelandic)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Galician and Icelandic form of Maria.

In Spain this has been the most consistently popular name for girls since the 13th century. Over the last 100 years it has remained very popular, frequently ranked first and never out of the top 20. It is often part of a double name, sometimes referencing an aspect of the Virgin Mary, such as María Carmen or María Dolores. It is occasionally used as a masculine middle name (or as the second part of a masculine double name, such as José María).

Mariah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-RIE-ə
Variant of Maria. It is usually pronounced in a way that reflects an older English pronunciation of Maria. The name was popularized in the early 1990s by the American singer Mariah Carey (1970-).
Marian 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-ee-ən, MAR-ee-ən
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Marion 1. This name was borne in English legend by Maid Marian, Robin Hood's love. It is sometimes considered a combination of Mary and Ann.
Marina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρίνα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Marko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish, Estonian, Basque
Other Scripts: Марко(Ukrainian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-ko(Finnish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Form of Mark in several languages.
Marlena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, English
Pronounced: mar-LEH-na(Polish) mahr-LEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of Marlene.
Marta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian, Swedish, Icelandic, Latvian, Estonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Марта(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian) მართა(Georgian)
Pronounced: MAR-ta(Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German) MAR-tu(European Portuguese) MAKH-tu(Brazilian Portuguese) MAR-tə(Catalan) MAHR-TAH(Georgian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Form of Martha used in various languages.
Mateo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Croatian
Pronounced: ma-TEH-o(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Matthew. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form Matteo.
Mati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Archaic)
Pronounced: MAH-ti(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From Guanche *măttəy, meaning "wanders". This was recorded as the name of a 7-year-old Guanche girl from Tenerife who was sold at the slave market in Valencia in 1495.
Max
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Czech, Russian, Catalan
Other Scripts: Макс(Russian)
Pronounced: MAKS(German, English, Czech, Russian, Catalan) MAHKS(Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Short form of Maximilian (or sometimes of Maxwell in English). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Макс (see Maks).
Melania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: meh-LA-nya(Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish, Polish and Romanian form of Melanie.
Melanie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-nee(English) MEH-la-nee(German) meh-la-NEE(German)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μέλαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

Melina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Μελίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: mə-LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as Melissa or from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
Melissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Ancient Greek [1], Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μέλισσα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: mə-LIS-ə(English) MEH-LEES-SA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "bee" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a daughter of Procles, as well as an epithet of various Greek nymphs and priestesses. According to the early Christian writer Lactantius [2] this was the name of the sister of the nymph Amalthea, with whom she cared for the young Zeus. Later it appears in Ludovico Ariosto's 1516 poem Orlando Furioso [3] belonging to the fairy who helps Ruggiero escape from the witch Alcina. As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
Mencía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Galician name of debated origin and meaning (compare Mencia).
Meritxell
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: mə-ree-CHEHL
From the name of a village in Andorra where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The name of the village may derive from Latin meridies meaning "midday".
Mía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Mia.
Michael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Μιχαήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-kəl(English) MI-kha-ehl(German, Czech) MEE-kal(Danish) MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish) MEE-kah-ehl(Norwegian) mee-KA-ehl(Latin)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel).

In the United States, this name rapidly gained popularity beginning in the 1930s, eventually becoming the most popular male name from 1954 to 1998. However, it was not as overwhelmingly common in the United Kingdom, where it never reached the top spot.

Famous bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

Mimi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEE-mee
Diminutive of Maria and other names beginning with M.
Miranda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: mi-RAN-də(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play The Tempest (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
Mireya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Variant of Mireia.
Miriam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) mee-RYAM(Spanish) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Hebrew form of Mary. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
Mirian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Judeo-Spanish, Judeo-Anglo-Norman
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Judeo-Spanish and Judeo-Anglo-Norman variant of Miriam.
Misael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Spanish
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Variant of Mishael.
Missael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: mi-sa-EHL(Latin American Spanish)
Variant of Misael.
Moneiba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare), Guanche Mythology
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Guanche *mənəy-ibba meaning literally "smoky glow". This was the name of a goddess worshipped by women on the island of Hierro (present-day Canary Islands, Spain), which was inhabited by a people known as the Bimbache.
Mónica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese (European)
Pronounced: MO-nee-ka(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Monica.
Morgan 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən(English) MAWR-GAN(French)
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
Morgana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Morgan 1.
Muriel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Irish
Pronounced: MYUWR-ee-əl(English) MUY-RYEHL(French)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Medieval English form of a Breton name that was probably related to the Irish name Muirgel. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel John Halifax, Gentleman (1856).
Nadia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Nadya 1 used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
Nahuel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Pronounced: nə-WEHL(Mapudungun) na-WEHL(Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "jaguar" in Mapuche.
Naiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: nie-A-ra
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.
Naira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Recorded ca. 1484 by Pedro Gómez Escudero as the name of a Guanche (male) warrior from Telde. According to the scholar Ignacio Reyes García, the name means "front" or "to guide" in the Guanche language.
Naira was revived in the Canary Islands in the 1970s as a feminine name.
Naomie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern, Rare), English, Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant of Naomi.
Natalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλία(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian, Bulgarian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Nauzet
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Guanche *(a)nuhazzeṭ meaning "the most elegant". According to Antonio de Viana's epic poem Antigüedades de las Islas Afortunadas de la Gran Canaria (1604), Nauzet or Nuhazet was a Guanche warrior who fought in the battle of Acentejo in the army of the mencey Bencomo.
Náyade
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: NAH-yah-dheh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Spanish word náyade meaning "Naiad", which is a river nymph in Greek and Roman mythology; it derives from Greek Ναιάς (Naias) (plural Ναϊάδες (Naiades)), itself a derivative of the verb νάω (nao) "to flow".
Nayara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Naiara.
Nayeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec, Spanish (Mexican)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
Nayra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Variant of Naira.
Nazaret
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Armenian
Other Scripts: Նազարեթ(Armenian)
Pronounced: na-tha-REHT(European Spanish) na-sa-REHT(Latin American Spanish) nah-zah-REHT(Armenian)
From Nazareth, the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Armenian.
Nélida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Spanish
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel Nélida (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name Daniel.
Nelly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, French, German
Pronounced: NEHL-ee(English) NEH-luy(Swedish) NEH-LEE(French)
Diminutive of Nell and other names containing nel.
Némesis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Hispanicized), Spanish
Pronounced: NEH-meh-sees(Spanish)
Spanish form of Nemesis.
Nerea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Sicilian, Galician
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Nereo.
Nerys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Perhaps an elaboration of Welsh ner "lord", with the intended meaning of "lady".
Nicole
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: NEE-KAWL(French) ni-KOL(English) nee-KOL(Dutch) nee-KAWL(German)
French feminine form of Nicholas, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
Nieves
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NYEH-behs
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
Noa 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: נוֹעָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-a(Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Modern Hebrew form of Noah 2, the daughter of Zelophehad in the Bible. It is also the form used in several other languages, as well as the spelling used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
Nour
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نور(Arabic)
Pronounced: NOOR
Alternate transcription of Arabic نور (see Nur).
Nuno
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Medieval Portuguese
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Medieval Portuguese and Spanish name, possibly from Latin nonus "ninth" or nunnus "grandfather". Saint Nuno was a 14th-century Portuguese general who defeated a Castilian invasion.
Nuria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NOO-rya
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Núria.
Nyala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the name of a type of African antelope, ultimately derived from the Bantu word nyálà.
Octavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ə(English) ok-TA-bya(Spanish) ok-TA-wee-a(Latin)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Octavius. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
Odelia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Form of Odilia.
Olaya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Asturian, Galician (Hispanicized)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Variant of Olalla, most often used in Asturias.
Olga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gaw(Hungarian) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Russian form of Helga. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
Oliva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "olive". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Brescia.
Oliver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

Olivia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) AW-LEE-VYA(French) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

Ona 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: O-nə
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Short form of Mariona. It also coincides with a Catalan word meaning "wave".
Orchena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare)
Pronounced: or-CHEH-na(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Guanche *oršena, meaning "young woman". This was the name of Tenesoya's maid.
Oriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-RYA-na
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
Oriol
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: oo-ree-AWL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a Catalan surname meaning "golden". It has been used in honour of Joseph Oriol, a 17th-century saint.
Óscar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: OS-kar(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Spanish and Portuguese form of Oscar.
Paola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: PA-o-la
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Italian feminine form of Paul.
Pastora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pas-TO-ra
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Pastor.
Patricia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Pronounced: pə-TRISH-ə(English) pa-TREE-thya(European Spanish) pa-TREE-sya(Latin American Spanish) pa-TREE-tsya(German)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Patricius (see Patrick). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland [1].
Paula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: POW-la(German, Spanish, Polish, Croatian) PAWL-ə(English) POW-lah(Finnish) POW-lu(Portuguese) PAW-oo-law(Hungarian)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Paulus (see Paul). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
Pelayo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: peh-LA-yo
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Pelagius.
Perla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: PEHR-la
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish cognate of Pearl.
Petra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Петра(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: PEH-tra(German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak) PEH-traw(Hungarian) PEHT-rah(Finnish) PEHT-rə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Peter. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
Portia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name Porcius, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearean character.
Queralt
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: kə-RAL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of a Spanish sanctuary (in Catalonia) that is devoted to the Virgin Mary.
Raisa 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Раиса(Russian) Раїса(Ukrainian) Раіса(Belarusian)
Pronounced: ru-EES-ə(Russian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly from the Greek name Herais. This was the name of a saint and martyr killed in Alexandria during the early 4th-century persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
Ramagua
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Archaic)
Pronounced: ra-MAH-gwa(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Guanche *ramag, meaning "thunder".
Raquel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English
Pronounced: ra-KEHL(Spanish) rə-KEHL(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Rachel.
Rayan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Variant of Ryan.
Rayco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from the Guanche word *răyyək, referring to a member of the Irăyyăkăn, a noble tribe of the Adrar des Ifoghas area of Mali. According to Antonio de Viana's epic poem Antigüedades de las Islas Afortunadas de la Gran Canaria (1604), this was the name of a late 15th-century Guanche captain and ambassador who served under Beneharo, the king of Anaga on the island of Tenerife (present-day Canary Islands, Spain), at the time of the Spanish conquest of the island.
Reina 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: RAY-na
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "queen" in Spanish.
Rocío
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-THEE-o(European Spanish) ro-SEE-o(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "dew" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Rocío meaning "Mary of the Dew".
Rodrigo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Galician
Pronounced: ro-DHREE-gho(Spanish) roo-DREE-goo(European Portuguese) ho-DREE-goo(Brazilian Portuguese) ro-DREE-go(Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Roderick. A notable bearer was Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, also known as El Cid, an 11th-century Spanish military commander.
Roma 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the name of the Italian city, commonly called Rome in English.
Rosalía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Galician
Pronounced: ro-sa-LEE-a(Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Galician form of Rosalia.
Roxana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ῥωξάνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Latin form of Ῥωξάνη (Rhoxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
Rubén
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: roo-BEHN
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Reuben.
Ruth 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רוּת(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOTH(English) ROOT(German, Spanish)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.

As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

Sabela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: sa-BEHL-a
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Galician form of Isabel.
Sabrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
Sahara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Other Scripts: صَحَارَى(Arabic)
Pronounced: sə-HAHR-ə, sə-HAR-ə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the name of the world's largest hot desert, which is derived from Arabic صَحَارَى‎ (ṣaḥārā) meaning "deserts".
Salvador
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan
Pronounced: sal-ba-DHOR(Spanish) səl-bə-DHO(Catalan)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan form of the Late Latin name Salvator, which meant "saviour", referring to Jesus. A famous bearer of this name was the Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1989).
Samael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Other Scripts: סַמָּאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "severity of God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an archangel in Jewish tradition, described as a destructive angel of death.
Samara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the city of Samarra (in Iraq) or Samara (in Russia). The former appears in the title of the novel Appointment in Samarra (1934) by John O'Hara, which refers to an ancient Babylonian legend about a man trying to evade death. Alternatively, this name could be derived from the word for the winged seeds that grow on trees such as maples and elms.

The name received a boost in popularity after it was borne by the antagonist in the horror movie The Ring (2002).

Samuel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: שְׁמוּאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAM-yoo-əl(English) SAM-yəl(English) SA-MWEHL(French) ZA-mwehl(German) sa-MWEHL(Spanish) san-MOO-ehl(Polish) SA-moo-ehl(Czech, Slovak, Swedish) SAH-moo-ehl(Finnish)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el), which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.

As a Christian name, Samuel came into common use after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include American inventor Samuel Morse (1791-1872), Irish writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), and American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain.

Sara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, German, French, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish, English, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, Bosnian, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σάρα(Greek) Сара(Serbian, Macedonian) שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic) سارا(Persian)
Pronounced: SA-ra(Spanish, Italian, Danish, Icelandic, Polish) SAH-rah(Finnish, Dutch) ZA-ra(German) SA-RA(French) SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-rah(Arabic)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Form of Sarah used in various languages.
Sarah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-RA(French) ZA-ra(German) SA-rah(Arabic)
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was consistently popular in the 20th century throughout the English-speaking world, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1970s and 80s.

Notable bearers include Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne, and the French actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923).

Saray
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: שָׂרָי(Ancient Hebrew) שרי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: sah-RIE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of Sarai. In Spain, this is the more common spelling of the name.
Selena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Селена(Russian) Σελήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: seh-LEH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Selene. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
Selene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σελήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek) si-LEE-nee(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, a Titan. She was sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
Serena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə(English) seh-REH-na(Italian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a Late Latin name that was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Sergio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SEHR-jo(Italian) SEHR-khyo(Spanish)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Sergius.
Sheila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHEE-lə
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Síle.
Sibisse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Guanche *sibissəy meaning "armhole (in clothing); cleavage, neckline; theft". This was recorded as the name of a 16-year-old Guanche girl from Tenerife who was sold at the slave market in Valencia in 1495.
Sira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan (Modern, Rare), German (Swiss, Rare), Russian (Archaic), Italian (Swiss), Italian (Rare), Galician
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Italian and Galician Siro, Catalan Sir and Russian Sir.
Skadi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Variant of Skaði.
Sofía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: so-FEE-a
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Sophia.
Sofie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech
Pronounced: zo-FEE(German) so-FEE-ə(Danish) suw-FEE(Swedish) so-FEE(Dutch) SO-fi-yeh(Czech)
Form of Sophie in several languages.
Soraya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Spanish, French, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: ثریا(Persian)
Pronounced: so-ray-YAW(Persian) so-RA-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Persian form of Thurayya. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya (1932-2001), wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.
Sumire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 菫, 澄玲, etc.(Japanese Kanji) すみれ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SOO-MEE-ṘEH
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Japanese 菫 (sumire) meaning "violet". It can also come from 澄 (sumi) meaning "clear" combined with 玲 (re) meaning "tinkling of jade". Other kanji conbinations can form this name as well. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Talía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Spanish, Galician
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Icelandic, Spanish and Galician form of Thalia.
Tamara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Lithuanian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Тамара(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Macedonian) თამარა(Georgian)
Pronounced: tu-MA-rə(Russian) TA-ma-ra(Czech, Slovak) tan-MA-ra(Polish) TAW-maw-raw(Hungarian) tə-MAR-ə(English) tə-MAHR-ə(English) TAM-ə-rə(English) ta-MA-ra(Spanish, Italian) tu-mu-RU(Lithuanian)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Russian form of Tamar. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
Tara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian), Guanche Mythology
Pronounced: TAH-ra(Canarian Spanish, Guanche Mythology)
From Guanche taṛa, meaning "love". This was the name of a goddess of fertility in Guanche mythology. Alternatively, it may be derived from Guanche tara, meaning "tree", and referring to a pre-Hispanic village ubicated in Telde, Gran Canaria.
Tatiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, French, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιάνα(Greek) ტატიანა(Georgian) Татьяна(Russian) Татяна(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish, German) TAH-tee-ah-nah(Finnish) ta-TYAHN-ə(English) tu-TYA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name Tatius. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
Teo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Croatian, Slovene, Georgian
Other Scripts: თეო(Georgian)
Pronounced: TEH-o(Spanish, Italian, Croatian)
Short form of Teodoro and other names that begin with Teo. In Georgian this is a feminine name, a short form of Teona.
Teresa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan, Polish, Lithuanian, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: teh-REH-sa(Spanish, Polish) teh-REH-za(Italian, German) tə-REH-zə(Catalan) tyeh-ryeh-SU(Lithuanian) TEH-reh-sah(Finnish) tə-REE-sə(English) tə-REE-zə(English)
Form of Theresa used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the Albanian missionary Saint Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), better known as Mother Teresa, who worked with the poor in India. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
Thaïs
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θαΐς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Possibly means "bandage" in Greek. This was the name of a companion of Alexander the Great. It was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Alexandria, a wealthy socialite who became a Christian convert, though in her case the name may have had a distinct Coptic origin. She has been a popular subject of art and literature, including an 1891 novel by Anatole France and an 1894 opera by Jules Massenet.
Thalía
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Talía.
Tiffany
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIF-ə-nee
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Medieval form of Theophania. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.
Triana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Modern)
Pronounced: TRYA-na
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the name of a neighbourhood in the city of Seville, of uncertain meaning.
Uriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: אוּרִיאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: YUWR-ee-əl(English)
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיאֵל ('Uri'el) meaning "God is my light", from אוּר ('ur) meaning "light, flame" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Uriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition. He is mentioned only in the Apocrypha, for example in the Book of Enoch where he warns Noah of the coming flood.
Vaitiare
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Tahitian vai "water" and tiare "flower".
Valentino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Italian form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1).
Vanessa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: və-NEHS-ə(English) VA-NEH-SA(French) va-NEH-sa(German)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his 1726 poem Cadenus and Vanessa [1]. He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
Vega
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
The name of a star in the constellation Lyra. Its name is from Arabic الواقع (al-Waqi') meaning "the swooping (eagle)".
Velvela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: װעלװעלע(Yiddish)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Velvel.
Venus
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: WEH-noos(Latin) VEE-nəs(English)
Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love and sex. Her character was assimilated with that of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. As the mother of Aeneas she was considered an ancestor of the Roman people. The second planet from the sun is named after her.
Vera 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Belarusian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Verónica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: beh-RO-nee-ka
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Veronica.
Víctor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: BEEK-tor
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Catalan form of Victor.
Victoria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of Victorius. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

Vidina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: vi-DI-na(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Mídeno.
Violeta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian, Lithuanian
Other Scripts: Виолета(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: byo-LEH-ta(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Form of Violet in several languages.
Vivia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Ancient Roman name Vivius.
Viviana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: vee-VYA-na(Italian) bee-BYA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Vivianus (see Vivian). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.
Vivienne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEHN
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French form of Viviana.
Walid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: وليد(Arabic)
Pronounced: wa-LEED
Means "newborn", derived from Arabic ولد (walada) meaning "to give birth". This was the name of the Umayyad caliph who conquered Spain in the 8th century.
Wiam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, French, Arabic (Maghrebi), Muslim
Other Scripts: ويام(Maghrebi Arabic, Arabic)
Pronounced: WI-ahm(Spanish) I-AHM(French) wi-AM(Maghrebi Arabic, Muslim)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "harmony" in Arabic.
Xana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Asturian
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From xana, the name of fairy or nymph in Asturian mythology. It may derive from the Roman mythological name Diana.
Xantal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: shən-TAL
Catalan variant of Chantal.
Xantena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian, Rare), Guanche Mythology
Pronounced: ksan-TEH-na(Canarian Spanish, Guanche Mythology) san-TEH-na(Canarian Spanish, Guanche Mythology)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Guanche *šan-əḍănay, meaning "twin recipient". In Guanche mythology, she was the mother of all humans.
Xavier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər(English) ig-ZAY-vyər(English) GZA-VYEH(French) shu-vee-EHR(European Portuguese) sha-vee-EHR(Brazilian Portuguese) shə-bee-EH(Catalan)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was born in a village by this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
Xeila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician (Modern)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Galician borrowing of Sheila.
Xenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξένια(Greek) Ξενία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξένος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.
Xerach
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Derived from Guanche *šərak, a masculine plural noun meaning "bad omens". This was recorded as the name of a 17-year-old Guanche girl from Tenerife who was sold at the slave market in Valencia in 1497. It is used as a masculine name in modern times.
Ximena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-MEH-na
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Ximeno. This was the name of the wife of El Cid.
Xiomara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: syo-MA-ra
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Possibly a Spanish form of Guiomar.
Xyla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare), Filipino
Pronounced: ZIE-lə(American English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly an invented name, perhaps based on Greek ξύλον (xylon) meaning "wood", a word used in the New Testament to mean "the Cross".
Xylia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ZIE-lee-ə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From xylo, a Greek root meaning "wood".
Xynthia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: KSUYN-tee-ah
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Modern variant of Cynthia.

Xynthia is the name of a notable cyclone in 2010 in Western Europe.

Yadiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish variant of Jehudiel.
Yadira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Pronounced: jya-DHEE-ra(Spanish) ya-DHEE-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from an Arabic name. It has been used in Mexico since at least the 1940s [1], perhaps inspired by the Colombian actress Yadira Jiménez (1928-?), who performed in Mexican films beginning in 1946.
Yair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew, Spanish (Latin American)
Other Scripts: יָאִיר(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Hebrew form of Jair, as well as a Spanish variant.
Yaiza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: JYIE-tha(European Spanish) YIE-tha(European Spanish) JYIE-sa(Latin American Spanish) YIE-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the name of a town in the Canary Islands, Spain. It was used by the novelist Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa for the main character in his Ocean trilogy of books (beginning 1984).
Yamilet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Variant of Yamila.
Yanira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: yah-NEE-rah(Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Janira.
Yara 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant of Iara.
Yasmina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, French, Spanish
Other Scripts: ياسمينة(Arabic)
Pronounced: yas-MEE-nah(Arabic) YAS-MEE-NA(French)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Yasmin.
Yenifer
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish variant of Jennifer.
Yeray
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: jyeh-RIE(Canarian Spanish)
This name has been used in the Canary Islands since the 1970s. It was apparently lifted from a Canarian place name, which is derived from a Guanche word meaning "big, grand". Perhaps coincidentally, the name of the Guanche god Xerax has also been incorrectly recorded as Yeray.
Yerussa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Judeo-Spanish
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Of uncertain origin and meaning. One theory considers this name a variant of Jerusha.
Yesenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: jyeh-SEH-nya, yeh-SEH-nya
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From Jessenia, the genus name of a variety of palm trees found in South America. As a given name, it was popularized by the writer Yolanda Vargas Dulché in the 1970 Mexican telenovela Yesenia and the 1971 film adaptation [1].
Yésica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: JYEH-see-ka, YEH-see-ka
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Jessica.
Yéssica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: JYEH-see-ka, YEH-see-ka
Spanish form of Jessica.
Yetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish, Jewish
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly a diminutive of Yehudit or Esther, or a variant of Etta.
Ylenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Ilenia.
Ylva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
Yohana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Amharic, Portuguese (Brazilian), English (American, Rare), French (Modern, Rare), Various
Other Scripts: ዮሐና(Amharic)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Form of Johanna in various languages. In Indonesia for instance, this is the feminine form of Yohanes or for Amharic, this is a variant transcription of Yohanna.
Yolanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: yo-LAN-da(Spanish) yo-LAHN-də(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the medieval French name Yolande, which was probably a form of the name Violante, which was itself a derivative of Latin viola "violet". Alternatively it could be of Germanic origin.

This name was borne by a 12th-century empress of the Latin Empire in Constantinople, who was originally from Flanders. It was also used by her descendants in the royal families of Hungary (spelled Jolánta) and Spain (sometimes spelled Violante). The Blessed Yolanda of Poland was a daughter of Béla IV of Hungary who married a Polish duke. It was also borne by Yolanda of Vianden, a 13th-century countess from Luxembourg who joined a convent against her parents' wishes, later becoming the subject of medieval legend. Another notable bearer was a 15th-century duchess of Lorraine, the subject of the opera Iolanta (1892) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Yomara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic, Rare)
Pronounced: yo-MAH-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of Xiomara.
Yona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Alternate transcription of Hebrew יוֹנָה (see Yonah).
Yoselin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of Jocelyn.
Yulissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: zhoo-LEE-sah(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Variant of Julissa.
Yume
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 夢, 裕芽, etc.(Japanese Kanji) ゆめ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: YOO-MEH
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (yume) meaning "dream, vision". It can also come from (yu) meaning "abundant, rich, plentiful" and (me) meaning "bud, sprout", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.
Yurena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: yoo-RE-nah(Canarian Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Canarian Spanish name of recent origin, in use since at least the 1970s. It is based on the Guanche word yruene meaning "demon, evil spirit" - which was first recorded incorrectly as yurena by the French naturalist and military officer Jean-Baptiste Bory de Saint-Vincent in his Essai sur les Îles Fortunées (1803). A known bearer of this name is Canarian-born Spanish beauty queen Patricia Yurena Rodríguez (1990-).
Yvette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: EE-VEHT(French) ee-VEHT(English) i-VEHT(English)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of Yves.
Yvonne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EE-VAWN(French) i-VAHN(English) ee-VAWN(German) ee-VAW-nə(Dutch)
French feminine form of Yvon. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Zadkiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Judeo-Christian Legend
Other Scripts: צדקיאל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZAD-kee-el
Means "righteousness of God" in Hebrew. Rabbinic tradition considers him to be the Angel of Mercy and some believe him to be the Angel of the Lord that prevented Abraham from killing his son Isaac.
Zafira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic (Rare), Judeo-Arabic
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant transcription of Sapphira.
Zahara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זָהֳרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Zohar.
Zaira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: DZIE-ra(Italian) THIE-ra(European Spanish) SIE-ra(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Zaïre. It was used by Vincenzo Bellini for the heroine of his opera Zaira (1829), which was based on Voltaire's 1732 play Zaïre.
Zelda 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זעלדאַ(Yiddish)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Possibly a feminine form of Zelig.
Zelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Basque (Rare), Portuguese
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
English variant and Basque form of Celia.

In the case of the asteroid 169 Zelia, discovered in 1876, it was allegedly a feminine form of Zelos.

It may also be the Latinate form of Zélie.

Zella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, possibly an invented name. It arose in the 19th century.
Zenaida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηναΐδα(Ancient Greek)
Apparently a Greek derivative of Ζηναΐς (Zenais), which was derived from the name of the Greek god Zeus. This was the name of a 1st-century saint who was a doctor with her sister Philonella.
Zev
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זְאֵב(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew זְאֵב (see Zeev).
Zia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ضياء(Arabic)
Pronounced: dee-YA
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic ضياء (see Ziya).
Zion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: צִיוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIE-ən(English)
From the name of a citadel that was in the center of Jerusalem. Zion is also used to refer to a Jewish homeland and to heaven.
Zita 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Latvian
Pronounced: DZEE-ta(Italian) TSEE-ta(German) ZI-ta(Czech) ZEE-ta(Slovak) zyi-TU(Lithuanian)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
Zoe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Czech, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English) DZO-eh(Italian)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of Eve. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century.

As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).

Zoraida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: tho-RIE-dha(European Spanish) so-RIE-dha(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Perhaps means "enchanting" or "dawn" in Arabic. This was the name of a minor 12th-century Spanish saint, a convert from Islam. The name was used by Cervantes for a character in his novel Don Quixote (1606), in which Zoraida is a beautiful Moorish woman of Algiers who converts to Christianity and elopes with a Spanish officer.
Zynthia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, American (Rare), Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
Pronounced: TSUYN-tee-a(German) ZIN-thee-ə(American)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Germanised spelling of Cynthia.

As a given name mostly used in the Americas.

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