LMS's Personal Name List

Ada
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AW-daw(Hungarian) AH-dah(Finnish)
Rating: 61% based on 43 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as Adelaide or Adelina that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
Adabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: A-duu-bel, AY-duu-bel
Rating: 48% based on 23 votes
Combination of Ada and the popular name suffix bel.
Adalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
Rating: 78% based on 14 votes
Variant of Adelina.
Adaline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-ə-lien
Rating: 84% based on 11 votes
Variant of Adelina.
Adamae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 47% based on 21 votes
Combination of Ada and Mae.
Adamira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 82% based on 5 votes
Combination of Ada and the popular suffix -mira.
Adela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: ə-DEHL-ə(English) a-DHEH-la(Spanish) a-DEH-la(Polish) A-deh-la(Slovak)
Rating: 81% based on 14 votes
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
Adelaide
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
Adelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Other Scripts: Аделина(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-deh-LEE-na(Italian) a-dheh-LEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 91% based on 12 votes
From a Latinized Germanic name that was derived from the element adal meaning "noble".
Adeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: A-DU-LEEN(French) AD-ə-lien(English)
Rating: 88% based on 8 votes
French and English form of Adelina.
Adilena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
Variant of Adelina.
Alice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Czech, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) a-LEE-sə(German) A-li-tseh(Czech)
Rating: 82% based on 26 votes
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see Adelaide). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

Amelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian) an-MEH-lya(Polish)
Rating: 82% based on 13 votes
Variant of Amalia, though it is sometimes confused with Emilia, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

Ameliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
Variant of Emiliana.
Amelie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: a-meh-LEE
Rating: 81% based on 10 votes
German variant of Amelia.
Amelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Personal remark: mn bc nn Lina
Rating: 65% based on 14 votes
Old Germanic form of Emmeline.
Ameline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 77% based on 9 votes
French form of Amelina.
Ames
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Transferred use of the surname Ames.
Amy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
Personal remark: Honoring
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
Anabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-na-BEHL
Rating: 86% based on 9 votes
Spanish form of Annabel.
Anabela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 83% based on 9 votes
Portuguese form of Annabel.
Antonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνία(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 76% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Asher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ASH-ər(English)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
Atticus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 72% based on 17 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
August
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
Rating: 78% based on 9 votes
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of Augustus. This was the name of three Polish kings.

As an English name it can also derive from the month of August, which was named for the Roman emperor Augustus.

Augusta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-ta(Italian) ə-GUS-tə(English) ow-GUWS-ta(German)
Rating: 73% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Augustus. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
Augustina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal remark: mn bc nn Tina
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Avaline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Rating: 63% based on 21 votes
Variant of Aveline.
Avamae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino (Rare, Expatriate), English (Rare)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Combination of Ava and Mae.
Avelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Rating: 92% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of Avila.
Aveline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Rating: 78% based on 12 votes
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of Avila. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century [1].
Avera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Jewish (Rare, ?)
Rating: 93% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of Avraham.
Aviana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sicilian
Rating: 80% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Avianus.
Axel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German, French, English
Pronounced: A-ksehl(Swedish) A-ksəl(German) A-KSEHL(French) AK-səl(English)
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
Medieval Danish form of Absalom.
Balsam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic (Rare)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Basil 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAZ-əl
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
Bastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: BAS-tyan
Personal remark: nn Bash, mn bc "bastard"
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Short form of Sebastian.
Beatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-triks(German) BEH-a-triks(German) BEH-aw-treeks(Hungarian) BEH-ya-triks(Dutch) BEE-ə-triks(English) BEE-triks(English)
Personal remark: nn Bea, Trixie
Rating: 72% based on 27 votes
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.

In England the name became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, more commonly in the spelling Beatrice. Famous bearers include the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit, and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (1938-).

Bellatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 76% based on 16 votes
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
Benjamin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEHN-jə-min(English) BEHN-ZHA-MEHN(French) BEHN-ya-meen(German)
Personal remark: nn Ben
Rating: 53% based on 16 votes
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

Birch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BURCH
Rating: 62% based on 12 votes
From the English word for the birch tree. Famous bearers include Birch Evans Bayh III, senator from Indiana, who assumed office in 1999. Birch Evans Bayh II was a senator from Indiana 1963-1981.
Blythe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLIEDH
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
Cainan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קֵינָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-nən(English) kay-IE-nən(English)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Variant of Kenan.
Caius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: GA-ee-oos(Latin) KIE-əs(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Roman variant of Gaius.
Callen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Variant of Callan.
Callum
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-əm
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Variant of Calum.
Carolina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
Latinate feminine form of Carolus. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
Caroline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Rating: 73% based on 19 votes
French feminine form of Carolus.
Caspian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
Cassian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
Pronounced: KASH-ən(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from Cassius. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
Cassius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-oos(Latin) KASH-əs(English) KAS-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
Charlotta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: sha-LO-ta
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Swedish variant of Charlotte.
Cian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KYEE-ən(Irish)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "ancient" in Irish. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
Cianán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Cian. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
Ciarán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KYEE-ran, KEE-rawn
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Ciar. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
Ciarnan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 33% based on 11 votes
Variant of Kiernan.
Cillian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Probably from Gaelic ceall meaning "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
Clara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Personal remark: mn bc nn Clare
Rating: 79% based on 26 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
Conan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. It was borne as a middle name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. It is also the name of the hero of the Conan the Barbarian series of books, comics and movies, debuting 1932.
Cora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κόρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Personal remark: dislike nn Cory
Rating: 64% based on 36 votes
Latinized form of Kore. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of Cordula, Corinna and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Corabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 17 votes
Combination of Cora and the popular name suffix -bel (see Belle).
Coralina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare), French (Rare), Italian
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
Variant of Coraline.
Coralise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), French (Swiss)
Rating: 58% based on 13 votes
Elaboration of Coralie.
Corastella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 57% based on 13 votes
Combination of Cora and Stella.
Cuán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from the Irish element meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Cuthbert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KUTH-bərt
Rating: 12% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
Damhán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Declan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: DEHK-lən(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.
Dinah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דִּינָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: DIE-nə(English)
Personal remark: b/c of "Dina" pronunciation confusion
Rating: 52% based on 19 votes
Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English given name since after the Protestant Reformation.
Dorian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Romanian
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.
Dorothy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
Usual English form of Dorothea. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character, Dorothy Gale, in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and several of its sequels.
Eachan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Eames
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Transferred use of the surname Eames. Popularized after the surname of the artist, Eames.
Eamon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EH-mən
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Éamonn.
Eamonn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Éamonn.
Ean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Manx form of John.
Éanán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Eanmund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean. All are descended from (or otherwise etymologically related to) the Proto-Germanic verb *aunōną meaning "to lamb, to yean". With that said, the second element of this name is derived from Old English mund meaning "protection".

This name was borne by a little-known 8th-century king of Kent.

Earnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Irish form of Ernest.
Eastmund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Old English form of Esmond.
Edith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-dith(English) EH-dit(German, Swedish)
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
Edmund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

Egan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ee - gan
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Transferred use of the surname Egan.
Elabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Combination of Ella and the common suffix -bel.
Eleanor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Personal remark: nn Lenore, Nola, Nell
Rating: 80% based on 12 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienòr. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other Aenor" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

Eleanora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehl-ə-NAWR-ə
Rating: 79% based on 12 votes
Latinate form of Eleanor.
Eleonora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Swedish, Latvian, Dutch, Polish, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Greek
Other Scripts: Елеонора(Bulgarian, Ukrainian) Элеонора(Russian) Ελεονώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-leh-o-NAW-ra(Italian) eh-leh-o-NO-ra(German) eh-leh-aw-NAW-ra(Polish) eh-lyi-u-NO-rə(Russian)
Rating: 75% based on 11 votes
Form of Eleanor in several languages.
Elianora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 75% based on 11 votes
Variant of Alianora.
Elianora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sardinian, History
Rating: 69% based on 11 votes
Sardinian form of Eleonora.
Elianora de Bas (1347–1404) - known as Eleanor of Arborea in English - was the iuyghissa ("female judge" or Queen in Sardinian language) of Arborea from 1383 to her death. She was one of the last, most powerful and significant Sardinian judges, as well as the island's most renowned heroine.
Elijah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is Yahweh", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

Eliora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Personal remark: mn bc nn Ora
Rating: 86% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Elior.
Eliot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Elliott. A famous bearer of the surname was T. S. Eliot (1888-1965), an Anglo-American poet and dramatist, the writer of The Waste Land. As a given name, it was borne by the American mob-buster Eliot Ness (1903-1957).
Elisha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִישַׁע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-shə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". According to the Old Testament, Elisha was a prophet and miracle worker. He was the attendant of Elijah and succeeded him after his ascension to heaven.
Elliott
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name Elias.
Ellis 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-is
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Elijah.
Ellis 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: EHL-is
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Elisedd.
Elm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan, English
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Catalan form of Elmo, as well as a short form of Elmer. The name may also be taken directly from the English word elm, a type of tree.
Elmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: EHL-mo
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection". It is also a derivative of Erasmus, via the old Italian diminutive Ermo. Saint Elmo, also known as Saint Erasmus, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron of sailors. Saint Elmo's fire is said to be a sign of his protection.
Elnora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
Contracted form of Eleanora.
Élodie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LAW-DEE
Rating: 85% based on 13 votes
French form of Alodia.
Eloisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lo-EE-za
Rating: 90% based on 7 votes
Italian form of Eloise.
Eloise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Rating: 78% based on 13 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which was probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne by the 12th-century French scholar and philosopher Héloïse. Secretly marrying the theologian Peter Abelard at a young age, she became a nun (and eventually an abbess) after Abelard was violently castrated by order of her uncle Fulbert.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

Elsa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Icelandic, Finnish, Italian
Pronounced: EHL-sə(English) EHL-za(German) EHL-sah(Finnish)
Rating: 58% based on 14 votes
Short form of Elisabeth.
Elsinora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Obscure
Rating: 80% based on 8 votes
Possibly a variant of Elsinore or combination of Elsie and Nora.
Elsinore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, English
Pronounced: EL-si-nawr(Literature)
Rating: 67% based on 11 votes
The name of Hamlet's castle, which is an anglicized form of Helsingør, a Danish place name meaning "neck, narrow strait". Any modern use of this as a feminine name is due to its similarity to Eleanor and Elsa.
Elspeth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: EHLS-peth
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Scottish form of Elizabeth.
Emelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-meh-LEE-na
Rating: 90% based on 6 votes
Spanish form of Amelina (see Emmeline).
Emilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: ehn-MYEE-lyan(Polish)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Romanian and Polish form of Aemilianus (see Emiliano).
Emiliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: eh-mee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Emiliano.
Émilien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MEE-LYEHN
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
French form of Aemilianus (see Emiliano).
Emma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish) EHM-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's 1709 poem Henry and Emma [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

Emmalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 82% based on 6 votes
Variant of Emmeline.
Emmaline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
Variant of Emmeline.
Emmaus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare), Biblical
Pronounced: i-MAY-əs(American English, Biblical English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From the name of a biblical town, Ἐμμαούς (Emmaous) in Greek, which is probably from Aramaic hammat meaning "hot spring". In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus appears to two of his disciples on the road to Emmaus after his death, burial and resurrection.
Emmeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 78% based on 12 votes
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
Enver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Bosnian
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Turkish and Bosnian form of Anwar.
Eoghan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: O-in(Irish, Scottish) YO-in(Irish, Scottish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "born from the yew tree" in Irish, though it is possibly derived from Eugene. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages.
Eoin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: O-in
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Gaelic form of John.
Ephraim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶפְרָיִם(Hebrew) Ἐφραίμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EEF-ree-əm(English) EEF-rəm(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) meaning "fruitful". In the Old Testament Ephraim is a son of Joseph and Asenath and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.
Ephram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EE-frəm, E-frəm
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Variant of Ephraim.
Ephrem
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Variant of Ephraim. A known bearer of this name was Ephrem the Syrian, a 4th-century Syrian deacon who was also a prolific Syriac language hymn writer and theologian. He is venerated by Christians throughout the world, and especially among Syriac Orthodox Christians, as a saint.
Ettaline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: eh-tuh-LEEN
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
Euan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: YOO-ən
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Eoghan.
Eun
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: (Korean Hangul) 恩, 銀, etc.(Korean Hanja)
Pronounced: UN
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" or (eun) meaning "silver, money", as well as other hanja characters that are pronounced in the same way. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
Eunan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variation of Adomnán used to refer to St. Eunan.
Eva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Romanian, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εύα(Greek) Ева(Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic) ევა(Georgian)
Pronounced: EH-ba(Spanish) EH-va(Italian, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Icelandic, Greek) EE-və(English) EH-fa(German) EH-vah(Danish) YEH-və(Russian) EH-VAH(Georgian) EH-wa(Latin)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Form of Eve used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

This is also an alternate transcription of Russian Ева (see Yeva).

Evabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Combination of Eva and Bella.
Evalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 67% based on 10 votes
Combination of Eva and Lina or a variant of Evelina.
Evaline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
Variant of Evelyn.
Evamae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Combination of Eva and Mae.
Evander 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὔανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Personal remark: nn Van?
Rating: 62% based on 9 votes
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὔανδρος (Euandros) meaning "good of man", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
Evanora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English
Personal remark: Nn Evie, Nova
Rating: 68% based on 9 votes
The name of a witch in the movie Oz the Great and Powerful. Could be a female form of Evan, a combination of Eva and Nora or an altered form of Eleanora
Evanore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Variant of Evanora.
Evelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Greek, Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Εβελίνα(Greek) Эвелина(Russian) Евелина(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ehv-ə-LEE-nə(English) eh-veh-LEE-na(Italian, Swedish)
Rating: 77% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of Aveline. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel Evelina (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name Evelyn or an elaboration of Eve.
Eveline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: EHV-ə-leen(English) EHV-ə-lien(English) EHV-LEEN(French) eh-və-LEE-nə(Dutch) eh-və-LEEN(Dutch)
Rating: 78% based on 10 votes
Variant of Evelina.
Evelyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Aveline. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
Evenor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Rating: 60% based on 7 votes
Latinized form of Euenor. This name was borne by a Greek painter from the 5th century BC.

In Greek mythology, this is the name of several characters, one of which is the ancestor of the kings that ruled the legendary island of Atlantis.

Everina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Meaning uncertain, perhaps a feminine form of Everard. This was borne by Clara Everina Wollstonecraft (1765-1841), a younger sister of English philosopher Mary Wollstonecraft.
Everine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
Evernora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 70% based on 6 votes
Evren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish. In Turkic mythology the Evren is a gigantic snake-like dragon.
Ewan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: YOO-ən
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Eoghan.
Ewen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ewan.
Ezra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Personal remark: mn bc feminine sounding to some
Rating: 70% based on 8 votes
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
Ezrah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Ezrah is the father of Jether, Mered, Epher and Jalon, grandfather (through Mered) of Miriam, Shammai and Ishbah, and great-grandfather (through Ishbah) of Eshtemoa.
Ezrom
Gender: Masculine
Usage: South African
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
Likely a variant of Hezron.
Fallon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 26% based on 8 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera Dynasty.
Fenn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: FEN(British English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Originates from the names Fen. A Fen is a type of wetland.
Fennix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Fielder
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Fielder.
Finch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Pronounced: FINCH(English)
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Transferred use of the surname Finch.
Finian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FIN-ee-an, FIN-yan
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Finnian.
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Finnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Older form of Fionnán.
Finnén
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Older form of Finnian.
Finnian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
Finnick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: FIN-ik(Literature)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Created by author Suzanne Collins for a character in her 'Hunger Games' series of books, where it belongs to a victor and rebel from District 4. She may have derived it from the slang word finicky meaning "demanding", or perhaps it was intended to be a diminutive of Finn (compare Finnegan).

Character in Disney's Zootopia.

Finnix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Fionán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: fyun-awn
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Fionnán.
Fionnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FYI-nan
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Fionn. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
Forde
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: Ford
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
Variant of Ford or transferred use of the surname Forde.
Gavin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Medieval form of Gawain. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
Gideon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
Gilbert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: GIL-bərt(English) ZHEEL-BEHR(French) KHIL-bərt(Dutch) GIL-behrt(German)
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century English saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
Graham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm(English) GRAM(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham [1]. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
Grey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
Variant of Gray.
Grover
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRO-vər
From a surname meaning "grove of trees" from Old English graf. A famous bearer was the American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), who popularized the name in the United States at the end of the 19th century. The name is now associated with a muppet character from the children's television program Sesame Street.
Hadrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: HAY-dree-ən(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was the name of two Roman settlements. The first (modern Adria) is in northern Italy and was an important Etruscan port town. The second (modern Atri) is in central Italy and was named after the northern town. The Adriatic Sea is also named after the northern town.

A famous bearer of the name was Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, a 2nd-century Roman emperor who built a wall across northern Britain. His family came from the town of Atri in central Italy.

Hamnet
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Personal remark: mn bc nn Ham
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Hamo. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play Hamlet.
Hayden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-dən
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Heath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEETH
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley [1].
Hendry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Scots variant of Henry.
Henley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Transferred use of the surname Henley.
Henry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHN-ree
Personal remark: nn Hank
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was usually rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the later Middle Ages it was fairly popular, and was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947), and American actor Henry Fonda (1905-1982).

Herb
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HURB
Short form of Herbert.
Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Scottish form of John.
Ida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Slovak, Slovene, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: IE-də(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Dutch, Italian, Polish) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish) EE-daw(Hungarian)
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

Idabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Spanish (Caribbean, Rare), American (Hispanic, Rare)
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Contraction of Ida and Isabel.
Ilsa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: IL-za
Rating: 68% based on 8 votes
Variant of Ilse.
Imogen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
The name of a princess in the play Cymbeline (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden". As a given name it is chiefly British and Australian.
Isabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL(Spanish) ee-zu-BEHL(European Portuguese) ee-za-BEW(Brazilian Portuguese) IZ-ə-behl(English) EE-ZA-BEHL(French) ee-za-BEHL(German, Dutch)
Personal remark: mn bc nn Belle
Rating: 81% based on 9 votes
Medieval Occitan form of Elizabeth. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

Isadora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese
Pronounced: iz-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Personal remark: nn Sadie, mn bc nn Dora
Rating: 71% based on 8 votes
Variant of Isidora. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
Isamira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Rating: 85% based on 6 votes
Variant of Isamir.
Isamora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Brazilian
Rating: 77% based on 7 votes
Isla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: IE-lə
Rating: 72% based on 12 votes
Variant of Islay, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
Isola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Rating: 73% based on 9 votes
Popularly claimed to be derived from the Italian word isola "island", this name might actually rather be a variant of Isolda.

Isola Wilde was the younger sister of author and playwright Oscar Wilde. Isola died aged eight of meningitis, and her brother dedicated the poem Requiescat to her memory.

Isora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Spanish (Rare)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Variant of Isaura as well as a contracted form of Isidora.
Jack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of John [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name Jacques [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

Jacob
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

Jane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 76% based on 11 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see John). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

Jediah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Jedidiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְדִידְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jehd-i-DIE-ə(English)
Personal remark: nn Jed & Jedi
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "beloved of Yahweh" in Hebrew, derived from יָדִיד (yadid) meaning "beloved, friend" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is a name given to Solomon by Nathan.
Jeremiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִרְמְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jehr-i-MIE-ə(English)
Personal remark: nn Jeremy, mn bc nn Jerry
Rating: 14% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "Yahweh will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.

In England, though the vernacular form Jeremy had been occasionally used since the 13th century, the form Jeremiah was not common until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jeremías
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kheh-reh-MEE-as
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Jeremiah.
Jeremias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare), Portuguese, Finnish
Pronounced: yeh-reh-MEE-as(German) YEH-reh-mee-ahs(Finnish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
German, Portuguese and Finnish form of Jeremiah.
Jeremy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JEHR-ə-mee(English) JEHR-mee(English)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
English form of Jeremiah, originally a medieval vernacular form. This is the spelling used in some English versions of the New Testament.
Jeshaiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Refers to multiple figures in the Bible.
Jeshua
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
The name means "he will save" and is a form of the Biblical Hebrew name Yehoshua (Joshua). The Late Biblical Hebrew spellings for earlier names often contracted the theophoric element Yeho-.
Jillian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən
Personal remark: Honoring
Rating: 50% based on 20 votes
Variant of Gillian.
Jilliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Variant of Gilliana.
Jillianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Elaboration of Jillian, see also Jilliana.
Joliet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French (Quebec)
Pronounced: zho-lee-ET(English) Jo-lee-ET(English) ZHO-LEE-AY(Quebec French)
Rating: 85% based on 4 votes
Transferred use of the surname Joliet.
Josephina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: jo-sə-FEEN-ə
Personal remark: Honoring
Rating: 81% based on 10 votes
Latinate variant of Joséphine.
Josephine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: JO-sə-feen(English) yo-zeh-FEE-nə(German)
Rating: 94% based on 10 votes
English, German and Dutch form of Joséphine.
Joshua
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHSH-oo-ə(English)
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "Yahweh is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

Judah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-də(English)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדָה (Yehudah), probably derived from יָדָה (yadah) meaning "praise". In the Old Testament Judah is the fourth of the twelve sons of Jacob by Leah, and the ancestor of the tribe of Judah. An explanation for his name is given in Genesis 29:35. His tribe eventually formed the Kingdom of Judah in the south of Israel. King David and Jesus were among the descendants of him and his wife Tamar. This name was also borne by Judah Maccabee, the Jewish priest who revolted against Seleucid rule in the 2nd century BC, as told in the Books of Maccabees.

The name appears in the New Testament using the spellings Judas and Jude.

Jude 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Variant of Judas. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
Juliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-YA-na(Dutch) yoo-LYA-na(German) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English) khoo-LYA-na(Spanish) YOO-lee-a-na(Slovak)
Rating: 80% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Iulianus (see Julian). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
Julianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Polish, English
Pronounced: YOO-lee-awn-naw(Hungarian) yoo-LYAN-na(Polish) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Iulianus (see Julian).
Juna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Dutch
Pronounced: YOO-nah(German) JOO-nah(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Junius or variant of Juno, June, Junia or Djuna. Also a south Slavic name and thus a feminine form of masculine names like Junij, Junii, Juno, Junian or Junak. The Slavic element "jun/iun" means "young". The name has been used as a given name since 1919.
June
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOON
Rating: 56% based on 9 votes
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
Kai 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Pronounced: KIE(German, Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas, Cornelis or Gaius.
Kaien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture, Chinese, Taiwanese
Other Scripts: 海燕(Chinese)
Pronounced: K-eye-en(Popular Culture) kie-en(Popular Culture)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Kainan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Καϊνάν(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Form of Cainan used in the Greek Old Testament.
Kane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KAYN(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Cathán.
Kate
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT(English)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of Katherine, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
Kean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Cian.
Keane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Variant of Kean.
Kearn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Anglicized, Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
This is an Anglicized version of Ciarán, which means "little black haired one."
Kearney
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: keer-ni
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Kearney.
Keegan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEE-gən
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of Aodh.
Kegan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Keegan.
Keir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was a variant of Kerr.
Kelham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Irish (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Kelham.
Kellian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Variant of Kelian.
Kellin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Anglicized)
Pronounced: Kell-un
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Caolán.
Kelm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Transferred use of the surname Kelm.
Kemp
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KEMP
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
Kian 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Cian.
Kieran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEER-ən(English) KEER-awn(English)
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kiernan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern), Irish
Pronounced: KEER-nən
Transferred use of the surname Kiernan.
Kilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Irish, French
Pronounced: KEE-lyan(German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
German form and Irish and French variant of Cillian.
Killian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Anglicized variant of Cillian, also used in France.
Kinnon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Kiran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil, Gujarati, Nepali, Urdu
Other Scripts: किरण(Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) ಕಿರಣ್(Kannada) కిరణ్(Telugu) കിരൺ(Malayalam) கிரன்(Tamil) કિરણ(Gujarati) کرن(Urdu)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Derived from Sanskrit किरण (kirana), which can mean "dust" or "thread" or "sunbeam".
Kiren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of Kieran.
Kirian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Kieran.
Knoll
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Knoll.
Knox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAHKS
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Old English cnocc "round hill".
Kyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American, English (Modern), Irish, Dutch
Pronounced: KY-in(African American) KY-an(African American) k-yan(English, Irish) KEE-an(English, Irish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Cian or Kiyan 1.
Kylian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French variant of Cillian.
Kynan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Possibly a form of Kynon, the legendary son of Clydno in the Mabinogion. Means "Chief."
Kyran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Kieran.
Lachlan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Laramie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: LEHR-ə-mee
As an American given name, this is likely taken from the name of multiple places in the state of Wyoming (see also Laramie), which were themselves derived from the French surname Laramie and named for Jacques LaRamie (1784-1821?), a Canadian frontiersman and explorer.
Lavinia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
Leander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λέανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Λέανδρος (Leandros), derived from λέων (leon) meaning "lion" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
Lennox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
Lenora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 80% based on 9 votes
Short form of Elenora.
Lenore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-NAWR
Personal remark: mn bc nn Lenny
Rating: 69% based on 10 votes
Short form of Eleanor. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem The Raven (1845).
Lenox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was a variant of Lennox.
Leona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(Czech)
Rating: 90% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Leon.
Leonora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 82% based on 5 votes
Italian short form of Eleanor.
Leopold
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: LEH-o-pawlt(German, Dutch) LEE-ə-pold(English) LEH-o-polt(Czech) LEH-aw-pawld(Slovak) leh-AW-pawlt(Polish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
Levi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: לֵוִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-vie(English) LEH:-vee(Dutch)
Rating: 71% based on 9 votes
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. This name also occurs in the New Testament, where it is another name for the apostle Matthew.

As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

Leviticus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare), African (Rare), African American
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the book of the Bible with the same name.

Some people in the USA see it as a more formal version of the name Levi.

Liliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 82% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of Lillian.
Lilith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 75% based on 12 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Lillian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Probably originally a diminutive of Elizabeth. It may also be considered an elaborated form of Lily, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
Lilliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: lil-ee-AN-ə
Personal remark: mn bc nn Ana
Rating: 78% based on 8 votes
Variant of Lillian.
Lillie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
Variant of Lily, or a diminutive of Lillian or Elizabeth.
Lilliela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
Elaboration of Lily or Lillie.
Lilliora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
Linus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Other Scripts: Λίνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LIE-nəs(English) LEE-nuys(Swedish) LEE-nuws(German)
From the Greek name Λίνος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip Peanuts.
Liren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 丽蓮, 丽恋, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: LEE-REN
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Combination of the names Li 1 and Ren
Liviana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na(Italian)
Rating: 100% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name Livius.
Lonán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LUW-nan
Means "little blackbird", derived from Irish Gaelic lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Lorcán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LOR-kan
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "little fierce one", derived from Irish Gaelic lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
Louella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: loo-EHL-ə
Rating: 80% based on 9 votes
Combination of Lou and the popular name suffix ella.
Lucélia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 77% based on 9 votes
Brazilian Portuguese form of Lucilia. A known bearer of this name is the Brazilian actress Lucélia Santos (b. 1957).
Lucy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-see
Rating: 91% based on 7 votes
English form of Lucia, in use since the Middle Ages.
Luken
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: LOO-kehn
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Basque form of Lucianus.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 83% based on 15 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lydia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδία(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Rating: 87% based on 15 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king Lydos. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
Madalena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: mu-du-LEH-nu
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
Portuguese form of Magdalena.
Madalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 94% based on 5 votes
Variant spelling of Mădălina used by Romanians abroad or in informal contexts (for example on the internet). Note that this is not the standard spelling of the name.
Madeleine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish
Pronounced: MAD-LEHN(French) MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) mahd-eh-LEHN(Swedish)
Rating: 83% based on 10 votes
French form of Magdalene.
Madelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of Madeline.
Madeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) MAD-LEEN(French)
Rating: 100% based on 5 votes
English form of Magdalene. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
Mae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Rating: 93% based on 10 votes
Variant of May. A famous bearer was the American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
Magnolia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mag-NO-lee-ə
Rating: 100% based on 8 votes
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
Maksim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Belarusian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Максим(Russian, Macedonian, Ukrainian) Максім(Belarusian)
Pronounced: muk-SYEEM(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Russian, Belarusian and Macedonian form of Maximus, as well as an alternate transcription of Ukrainian Максим (see Maksym).
Maksimilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Максимилиан, Максимильян(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Russian form of Maximilianus (see Maximilian).
Malone
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mə-LON
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Margaret
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

Margaux
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Variant of Margot influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
Margot
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
French short form of Margaret.
Marigold
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
Rating: 98% based on 4 votes
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of Mary and the English word gold.
Marigot
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAIR-I-GO
Origins in a West African language, meaning "creek" in reference to a side stream or tributary rivulet. This word was brought to the Caribbean and is currently used as names for multiple (six) French-Caribbean populated locations, and thus may be used as a word or location name.
Mathilda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) mah-TIL-dah(Swedish)
Rating: 92% based on 5 votes
Variant of Matilda.
Matilda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) MAH-teel-dah(Finnish) MA-teel-da(Slovak)
Rating: 100% based on 5 votes
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was very popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song Waltzing Matilda, written in 1895.

Maxen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MAK-sən
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Macsen.
Maxim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech
Other Scripts: Максим(Russian, Ukrainian) Максім(Belarusian)
Pronounced: muk-SYEEM(Russian) MAK-sim(Czech)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Максим or Belarusian Максім (see Maksim) or Ukrainian Максим (see Maksym). This is also the Czech form.
Maxima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Maximus.
Maximilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Pronounced: mak-see-MEE-lyan(German) mak-sə-MIL-yən(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from Maximus. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see Emiliano), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
Maximiliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Personal remark: nn Maxia, Maxima, Maximilienne, Maximillia, Maximina
Feminine form of Maximilianus.
McGregor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname McGregor.
Nathan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: נָתָן(Hebrew) Ναθάν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NAY-thən(English) NA-TAHN(French)
Personal remark: Honoring, nn Thane, Han, Newt
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.

It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Nathan Hale (1755-1776), an American spy executed by the British during the American Revolution.

Noela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Galician feminine form of Noël.
Nola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: NO-lə(English)
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of Magnolia, Finola and other names containing a similar sound.
Oak
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Old English āc, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch eik and German Eiche.
Oceania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Elaboration of Oceana.
Ofira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אוֹפִירָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Ofir.
Ollivander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: AHL-i-van-der(American English, Popular Culture)
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Surname of Garrick Ollivander, a wizard and the owner of Ollivander's Wand Shop in the Harry Potter book series and movie franchise by J. K. Rowling. In the Harry Potter universe the name is said to be of Mediterranean origin and mean "he who owns the olive wand".
Olympia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Slovak
Other Scripts: Ολυμπία(Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Olympos.
Ophelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ὠφελία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 90% based on 10 votes
Derived from Greek ὠφέλεια (opheleia) meaning "help, advantage". This was a rare ancient Greek name, which was either rediscovered or recreated by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this negative association, the name has been in use since the 19th century.
Ophira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Jewish, German (Rare)
Other Scripts: אוֹפִירָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 78% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Ophir.
Orville
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWR-vil
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
Owen 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Eoghan.
Pearl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Rating: 85% based on 8 votes
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
Pelham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred usage of the surname Pelham.
Penn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: PEN
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "head, top" in Welsh. This was the name of two characters in Welsh legend. It can also come from the English surname which was from a place name meaning "hill" in Old English.
Quinn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KWIN(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of Conn".
Remiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Variant of Jeremiel appearing in some versions of the Old Testament.
Remus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: REH-moos(Latin) REE-məs(English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of Rome. Remus was later slain by Romulus.
Rémy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: REH-MEE
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman, rower". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.
Rhoan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Variant of Roan.
Rhys
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: REES
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
Riordan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Rórdán.
Riven
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: riv-en
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Old Norse rīfa; akin to Greek ereipein, meaning "to tear down."
Roan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Variant of Ronne.
Roan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Variant of Rowan.
Roane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Roan.
Robert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: Роберт(Russian)
Pronounced: RAHB-ərt(American English) RAWB-ət(British English) RAW-BEHR(French) RO-beht(Swedish) RO-behrt(German, Finnish, Czech) RO-bərt(Dutch) RAW-behrt(Polish) RO-byirt(Russian) roo-BEHRT(Catalan)
Personal remark: Honoring nn Robin, Beau, Nod, Rory, Bird, Bertie
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).

This name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actors Robert Redford (1936-), Robert De Niro (1943-) and Robert Downey Jr. (1965-).

Roham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Iranian
Other Scripts: رهام(Persian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Rohan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jamaican Patois, English (Modern)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Jamaican Patois form and English variant of Rowan.
Rohan 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada
Other Scripts: रोहन(Hindi, Marathi) রোহন(Bengali) ರೋಹನ್(Kannada)
Derived from Sanskrit रोहण (rohana) meaning "ascending".
Rohme
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Rohme.
Roman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAWN-man(Polish) RO-man(Czech, German) RAW-man(Slovak) RO-mən(English)
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
Rónán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RO-nahn
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Ronen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: רוֹנֶן(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from Hebrew רוֹן (ron) meaning "song, joy".
Ronin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-nin
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Rónán.
Roran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Literature
Pronounced: Roar-In(Scottish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Roran is a derivative of the name Rory (Irish: Ruairí; Scottish Gaelic: Ruairidh) and so shares the meaning: The Red King.
Rórdán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROR-dan
From the older Irish name Ríoghbhardán, which meant "little poet king" from Irish Gaelic ríogh "king" combined with bard "poet" and a diminutive suffix.
Rory
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Ruaidhrí.
Rowan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ruadhán. As an English name, it can also be derived from the surname Rowan, itself derived from the Irish given name. It could also be given in reference to the rowan tree, a word of Old Norse origin (coincidentally sharing the same Indo-European root meaning "red" with the Irish name).
Ruby
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Personal remark: nn Bea
Rating: 84% based on 10 votes
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 16th century [1].
Safira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Polish (Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Polish and Portuguese form of Sapphira. It coincides with the Portuguese word for sapphire.
Salem
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-lem, SAY-lum
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the Biblical Hebrew שלם (shalém) meaning "complete, intact", from the Proto-Semitic *šalām- 'peace, well-being, welfare'. In the Bible Salem was the place of which Melchizedek was king, mostly identified with Jerusalem. Salem is also the name of several cities around the world, notably Salem, Massachusetts, where the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692 took place.

Salem is also the name of several bands, and Salem Saberhagen is the name of the warlock-turned-cat in the 'Sabrina, the Teenage Witch' comics and television series.

Samuel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: שְׁמוּאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAM-yoo-əl(English) SAM-yəl(English) SA-MWEHL(French) ZA-mwehl(German) sa-MWEHL(Spanish) san-MOO-ehl(Polish) SA-moo-ehl(Czech, Slovak, Swedish) SAH-moo-ehl(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el), which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.

As a Christian name, Samuel came into common use after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include American inventor Samuel Morse (1791-1872), Irish writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), and American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain.

Samwell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAM-wel
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Samwell Tarly is the name of a character from the Song of Ice and Fire books by GRR Martin and the TV show Game of Thrones based upon the former.
Saphira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature, German
Pronounced: se-FEER-ə(English) saf-EER-ə(English) sah-FEER-ah(German)
Rating: 97% based on 3 votes
English variant and German form of Sapphira. This is the name of Eragon's dragon in Christopher Paolini's 'Inheritance Cycle' series of books.
Sapphira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Σαπφείρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Σαπφείρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
Sephira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Variant of Saphira.
Shadrach
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שַׁדְרַך(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHAD-rak(English) SHAY-drak(English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "command of Aku" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament Shadrach is the Babylonian name of Hananiah, one of the three men cast into a fiery furnace but saved by God.
Shem
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שֵׁם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHEHM(English)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "name" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Shem is one of Noah's three sons (along with Japheth and Ham) and the ancestor of the Semitic peoples.
Silas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σίλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Personal remark: mn bc nn Cy
Rating: 57% based on 18 votes
Probably a short form of Silvanus. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name Saul (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

Sloan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLON
Variant of Sloane.
Sloane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLON
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name Sluaghadhán.
Soames
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Soames.
Sören
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, German
Pronounced: SUU-rehn(Swedish) ZUU-rən(German)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Swedish and German form of Søren.
Søren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish
Pronounced: SUUW-ən
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Danish form of Severinus. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.
Sorin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Possibly derived from Romanian soare meaning "sun".
Stelian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Romanian form of Stylianos.
Stellan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
Sumner
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-nər, SOME-nərr
Transferred use of the surname Sumner.
Susannah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Personal remark: Honoring, nn Zuzu or Sadie, mn bc nn Sue and Susie
Rating: 83% based on 11 votes
Form of Susanna found in some versions of the Old Testament.
Sylvia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə(English) SUYL-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 98% based on 4 votes
Variant of Silvia. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
Talan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish, Medieval Cornish
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Cornish tal "brow; forehead".
Talin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Թալին(Armenian)
Pronounced: tah-LEEN
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the name of an Armenian town (meaning unknown), which is home to a famous 7th-century cathedral.
Tallan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Talon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAL-ən
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the English word meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".
Tamsen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAM-zən
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Tamsin.
Taren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAR-uhn
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of Taryn or Taron.
Taron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Variant of Taran.
Thad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THAD
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Thaddeus.
Thames
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare, Archaic)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from the name of the River Thames. It has been in occasional use as a given name since the 19th century.
Thane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: THAYN
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the Scottish and English noble title, which was originally from Old English thegn.
Thelm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Masculine form (backformation) of Thelma.
Théoden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: THAY-aw-den
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Means "king, ruler" in Old English, probably from þeud "people" and þegen "thane, warrior" This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Théoden is the king of Rohan.
Theodin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Variant of Théoden.
Theodora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 71% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of Theodore. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
Theodore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
From the Greek name Θεόδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

Theon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Literature, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Θέων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Meaning uncertain. This name could be derived from the Greek noun θεός (theos) meaning "god", but it can also easily be derived from the Greek verb θέω (theo) meaning "to run fast, to fly" as well as "to shine, to gleam".

Notable bearers of this name include the Greek philosopher and mathematician Theon of Smyrna (2nd century AD) and the Greek scholar and mathematician Theon of Alexandria (4th century AD).

In modern literature, this name is best known for being the name of Theon Greyjoy, a character from the A Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels written by the American author George R. R. Martin (b. 1948). He also appears in Game of Thrones (2011-2019), a television series based upon the novels.

Theonora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Archaic)
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Thoren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Modern, Rare), English
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Variant of Thorin.
Thorin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Germanic Mythology, German (Modern), Popular Culture
Pronounced: THOR-in(Literature) TO-reen(German)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
German male name representing the Germanic god Thor.

Used by JRR Tolkien as the name of a dwarf, Thorin Oakensheild, who is the main dwarf in 'The Hobbit'. Tolkien took the name from the Dvergatal "Catalogue of Dwarves" in the Völuspá, a part of the Poetic Edda.

Thorn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THAWRN
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
A diminutive for Thornton and variation of Thorne, or from the English word "thorn", referring to "a sharp protective spine of a plant" or "that which pricks or annoys; anything troublesome".
Thorne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THORN
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Thorne. Derived from the Old English word for "thorn." This was the name of a letter in the Old English alphabet, as well as the name of a character from the soap opera "The Bold and the Beautiful."
Thornton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THAWRN-tən
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
Thorsten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, German
Pronounced: TAWRS-tən(German)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Variant of Torsten.
Thwaite
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Meaning, "clearing in a wooded area." May be used on its own, but may also be seen in combination with Medieval English and Old German personal names.
Tiarnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Modern Irish form of Tighearnán.
Tiernan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Tighearnán.
Tomlin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
A pet form of Tom, a short form of the personal name Thomas.
Tomnus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Torán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Formed from a diminutive of tor ‘lord’, ‘hero’, ‘champion’.
Toren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Variant of Torin.
Torin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.
Torren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Potential Anglicized variation of Swedish Torin.
Torrin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American), English (Australian), English (New Zealand)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Of unknown origin and meaning.
Torsten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, German
Pronounced: TOSH-tehn(Swedish) TAWRS-tən(German)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with steinn "stone".
Tumnus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature (Rare)
Pronounced: TUM-nus
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
The name of a faun in C.S. Lewis' novels, the Chronicles of Narnia. This may be used as a diminutive of Vertumnus.
Tzipora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew צִפּוֹרָה (see Tzipporah).
Tziporah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew צִפּוֹרָה (see Tzipporah).
Tzipporah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 79% based on 8 votes
Hebrew form of Zipporah.
Vesper
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Popular Culture
Pronounced: VES-pur(Popular Culture)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Hesperos with the same meaning, also used as common word.

In popular culture, Vesper was the name of James Bond's partner, and later lover, in the novel Casino Royale.

Vespera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: vehs-PEH-ra
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Means "of the evening", derived from Esperanto vespero "evening", ultimately from Latin vesper.
Wilbur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-bər
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
Wilder
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Wilder.
William
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
Personal remark: Honoring, nn Liam or Will
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". An early saint by this name was the 8th-century William of Gellone, a cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).

This name was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia. Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero (called Wilhelm in German, Guillaume in French and Guglielmo in Italian). In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

In the American rankings (since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it one of the most consistently popular names (although it has never reached the top rank). In modern times its short form, Liam, has periodically been more popular than William itself, in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and the United States in the 2010s.

Zacchaeus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ζακχαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: za-KEE-əs(English)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Ζακχαῖος (Zakchaios), the Greek form of Zaccai. In the New Testament he is a tax collector in Jericho who gives half his possessions to charity.
Zaphira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
Variant of Sapphira.
Zefram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: zef-rəm
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Rhyming variant of Ephraim, used in 'Star Trek'.
Zelda 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZEHL-də
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Short form of Griselda. This is the name of a princess in the Legend of Zelda video games, debuting in 1986. According to creator Shigeru Miyamoto she was named after the American socialite Zelda Fitzgerald (1900-1948).
Zenora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 92% based on 5 votes
Zephan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Truncated form of Zephaniah.
Zéphirine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (African, Rare)
Rating: 93% based on 6 votes
Variant of Zéphyrine.
Zephora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 92% based on 5 votes
Variant of Sephora.
Zephyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 96% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Zephyr.
Zeraphine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Quebec, Rare)
Rating: 96% based on 5 votes
Variant of Séraphine.
Ziphora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Jewish, Jewish (Archaic), American (South, Archaic)
Rating: 72% based on 12 votes
Variant of Zipporah.
Zipora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Jewish, Italian
Rating: 88% based on 5 votes
Variant of Zipporah.
Zipporah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 91% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
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