akaZsa's Personal Name List

ABE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AYB
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Short form of ABRAHAM.
ABEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: აბელ(Georgian) הֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew) Ἄβελ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AY-bəl(English) A-BEHL(French) a-BEHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) a-BEW(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-gayl(English)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigail refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play The Scornful Lady (1616), which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ABRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brə-ham(English) a-bra-AM(Spanish) A-BRA-AM(French) A-bra-hahm(Dutch) A-bra-ham(German) AH-bra-ham(Swedish)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) meaning "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the American president Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), who pushed to abolish slavery and led the country through the Civil War.

ABRAM (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: אַבְרָם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brəm(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "high father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament God changed Abram's name to Abraham (see Genesis 17:5).
ABSALOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְשָׁלוֹם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-sə-ləm(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name אַבְשָׁלוֹם ('Avshalom) meaning "my father is peace", derived from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". In the Old Testament he is a son of King David. He avenged his sister Tamar by arranging the murder of her rapist, their half-brother Amnon. He later led a revolt against his father. While fleeing on the back of a mule he got his head caught in a tree and was killed by Joab.
ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AW-daw(Hungarian) AH-dah(Finnish)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian) אָדָם(Hebrew) آدم(Arabic) ადამ(Georgian) Ἀδάμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AD-əm(English) A-DAHN(French) A-dam(German, Polish, Czech, Arabic) A-dahm(Dutch) AH-dam(Swedish) u-DAM(Russian) ah-DAHM(Ukrainian) ə-DHAM(Catalan)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) meaning "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Italian
Pronounced: a-DEH-lə(German) ə-DEHL(English) a-DEH-leh(Italian)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Form of ADELA used in several languages.
AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
ALASDAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Scottish form of ALEXANDER.
ALBA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: AL-ba(Italian, Spanish) AL-bə(Catalan)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALEKSEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алексей(Russian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY).
ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξάνδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian) Ἀλεξάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) AW-lehk-sawn-draw(Hungarian) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
ALLISON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-i-sən
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the middle of the 20th century this has primarily been used as a variant of the feminine name ALISON. However, prior to that it was used as an uncommon masculine name, derived from the English and Scottish surname ALLISON.
ALVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: AL-va(Swedish)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of ALF (1).
AMABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS.
AMANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MAHN-DEEN
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
French diminutive of AMANDA.
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀμβρόσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-LEE
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
French form of AMELIA.
AMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANDRÉ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: AHN-DREH(French) un-DREH(Portuguese) AN-dreh(German) ahn-DREH(Dutch)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
French and Portuguese form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo(English)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
English form of the Greek name Ἀνδρέας (Andreas), which was derived from ἀνδρεῖος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Άννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic) Ἄννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Rating: 80% based on 6 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 75% based on 6 votes
Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ANNE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN(French, English) A-neh(Swedish) A-nə(Danish, German) AHN-neh(Finnish) AH-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
French form of ANNA. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.

The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in Anne of Green Gables (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee(American English) AN-tə-nee(British English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ANTOINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, African American
Pronounced: AHN-TWAN(French) an-TWAWN(English)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
French form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνία(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
AOIFE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-fyə(Irish)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Means "beauty" from the Irish word aoibh. In Irish legend Aoife was a warrior princess. In war against her sister Scathach, she was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn. Eventually she was reconciled with her sister and became the lover of Cúchulainn. This name is sometimes used as a Gaelic form of EVE or EVA.
APOLLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀπόλλων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-PAHL-o(English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From Greek Ἀπόλλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo meaning "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb ἀπόλλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable, yielding to prayer".
ARCHIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: AHR-chee
Rating: 76% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of ARCHIBALD. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.
ARI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲרִי(Hebrew)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀριάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" and ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ἀθηνᾶ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

AUDRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Means "storm" in Lithuanian.
AUGUSTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-ta(Italian) ə-GUS-tə(English) ow-GUWS-ta(German)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTINE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-GUYS-TEEN
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LEE
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
French feminine form of AURELIUS.
AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
AYSEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "moon flood" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon" and sel "flood, stream".
BABETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: BA-BEHT(French)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
French diminutive of ELIZABETH or BARBARA.
BALTHAZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: BAL-thə-zahr(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Variant of BELSHAZZAR. Balthazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus. He was said to have come from Arabia.
BARBARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Pronounced: BAHR-bə-rə(English) BAHR-brə(English) BAR-BA-RA(French) BAR-ba-ra(German) bar-BA-ra(Polish) BAWR-baw-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Derived from Greek βάρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARNABY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.
BARTHOLOMEW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
English form of Βαρθολομαῖος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BEAU
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BO(English)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.

BELÉN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: beh-LEHN
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
BELLATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
BENEDIKT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Icelandic, Czech, Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Бенедикт(Russian)
Pronounced: BEH-neh-dikt(German, Czech) byi-nyi-DYEEKT(Russian)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT) in several languages.
BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEHN-jə-min(English) BEHN-ZHA-MEHN(French) BEHN-ya-meen(German)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BENJAMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BEHN-ZHA-MEEN
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of BENJAMIN.
BENNETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-it
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Medieval form of BENEDICT. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.
BENTLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BENT-lee
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BESS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHS
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHT
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. A famous bearer was American actress Bette Davis (1908-1989).
BIANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka(Italian) BYAN-ka(Romanian)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in Taming of the Shrew (1593) and Othello (1603).
BIRGITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Pronounced: bir-GI-ta(Swedish) BEER-geet-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEHZ
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the Roman name Blasius, which was derived from Latin blaesus meaning "lisping". A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BRADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: BRAY-dee(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wehn(Welsh)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh brân "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHT
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRITANNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRONWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Variant of BRONWEN.
BROOK
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
CÁEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From Irish caol meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CAIRBRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAHR-bra
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
CAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Short form of CALVIN.
CALE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAYL
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Short form of CALEB.
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-əm
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Variant of CALUM.
CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
CAMERON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
CANDIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, English
Pronounced: KAN-di-də(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play Candida (1898).
CAOIMHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CARAMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From the Italian phrase cara mia meaning "my beloved".
CARMEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish
Other Scripts: כַּרְמֶל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAHR-məl(English) KAR-məl(English)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KAHS-pər(Dutch) KAHS-pehr(Swedish) KAS-bu(Danish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in an American series of cartoons and comic books (beginning 1945).
CASSIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
Pronounced: KASH-ən(English)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CASSIDY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAS-i-dee
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHD-rik
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886).
CELESTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: theh-lehs-TEE-na(European Spanish) seh-lehs-TEE-na(Latin American Spanish) cheh-leh-STEE-na(Italian)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CHARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ(English) SHARL(French)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as Great Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities, French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the Peanuts comic strip.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

CIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KYEE-ən(Irish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "ancient" in Irish. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-REES, KLAR-is, KLEHR-is
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Latin)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLÉMENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLEH-MAHN-TEEN
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of CLEMENT. This is also the name of a variety of orange (fruit).
CLOTILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: KLAW-TEELD(French)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda, which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
COLUMBA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ko-LOOM-ba(Late Latin) kə-LUM-bə(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
CONSTANTINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: KAHN-stən-teen(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORMAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
COSETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Literature
Pronounced: KAW-ZEHT(French)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
DAFFODIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAF-ə-dil
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-zee
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DANA (2)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-nə
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of Two Years Before the Mast.
DANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYN
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was either a variant of the surname DEAN or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
DARYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Дарья(Russian) Дар'я(Belarusian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: DA-ryə(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian form of DARIA.
DASHIELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
DAYO
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "joy arrives" in Yoruba.
DEAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
DELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-ə
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of ADELA or ADELAIDE. A famous bearer is American actress and singer Della Reese (1931-).
DELPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEHL-FEEN
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
French form of DELPHINA.
DELTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-tə
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.
DEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: DEE-ahn(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Variant of DION.
DESMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEHZ-mənd(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian) Діана(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) dyee-AH-nu(Ukrainian) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Latin)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DIARMAID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DYEE-ər-ə-məd(Irish)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
DIDIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEE-DYEH
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
French form of DESIDERIO.
DIETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: DEE-tu
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and hari "army".
DIETRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: DEE-trikh
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
German form of THEODORIC.
DILLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIL-ən
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Variant of DYLAN based on the spelling of the surname Dillon, which has an unrelated origin.
DMITRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий(Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see DMITRIY).
DOLORES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: do-LO-rehs(Spanish) də-LAWR-is(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.
DOMINICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: dahm-i-NEE-kə(English) də-MIN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOROTHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and several of its sequels.
DOUGAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DROO
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Short form of ANDREW.
DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUNG-kən
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play Macbeth (1606).
EDMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

EDOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱדוֹם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-dəm(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From Hebrew אָדֹם ('adom) meaning "red". According to the Old Testament, Esau, who is described as having red skin, was given this name because he traded his birthright for a helping of red broth. The bible goes on to tell that Esau was the founder of the ancient nation of Edom, located to the south of the kingdom of Judah.
ELBA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: EHL-ba
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Possibly a Spanish variant form of ALBA (3).
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienòr. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek) Ἠλίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELISABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: eh-LEE-za-beht(German) eh-LEE-sa-beht(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELLIOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was a variant of ELLIOTT.
ELODIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eh-LO-dhya
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Spanish form of ALODIA.
ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

ELSPET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
EMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyə(German) eh-MEE-lee-eh(Norwegian) EHM-i-lee(Swedish)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMANUELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MA-NWEHL
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of EMMANUEL.
EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
EMMETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-it
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.
ESMÉ
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: EHZ-may, EHZ-mee
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century. It is now more common as a feminine name.
ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESTELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL-ə
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
ESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Ἐσθήρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

EVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εύα(Greek) Ева(Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic) ევა(Georgian)
Pronounced: EH-ba(Spanish) EH-va(Italian, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Icelandic) EE-və(English) EH-fa(German) EH-vah(Danish) YEH-və(Russian) EH-VAH(Georgian) EH-wa(Latin)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Form of EVE used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

This is also an alternate transcription of Russian Ева (see YEVA).

EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Means "good news" from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1847 epic poem Evangeline [1][2]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV(English)
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century, with the latter being more common.

EVERETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name EVERARD.
EWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: YOO-ən
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EZEKIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God will strengthen", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strengthen" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
FABIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FA-BYEHN
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FAIGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: פֿייגאַ(Yiddish)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Variant of FAIGEL.
FATIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: فاطمة(Arabic) فاطمہ(Urdu)
Pronounced: FA-tee-mah(Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic فاطمة (see FATIMAH), as well as the usual Urdu transcription.
FAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy", ultimately (via Old French) from Latin fata meaning "the Fates". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In some cases it may be used as a short form of FAITH.
FELICITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: fə-LIS-i-tee
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series Felicity.
FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Latin)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Феодора(Russian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Russian form of THEODORA.
FINBAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FIN-bar
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Variant of FIONNBHARR.
FINLEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: FIN-lee(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINNIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
FIONNUALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
FRANCES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRAN-sis
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century [1]. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
FRANCESCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: fran-CHEHS-ka(Italian) frən-SEHS-kə(Catalan)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FREDERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREHD-ə-rik, FREHD-rik
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FRIEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Pronounced: FREE-da(German) FREE-də(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of FRIDA.
FRITZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FRITS
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
German diminutive of FRIEDRICH.
GABE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAYB
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Short form of GABRIEL.
GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GARDENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: gahr-DEEN-ee-ə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GASPARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: GAS-PAR
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
French form of JASPER.
GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENEVIÈVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHU-NU-VYEHV, ZHUN-VYEHV
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.
GEORGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: JAWRJ(English) JYOR-jeh(Romanian)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Γεώργιος (Georgios), which was derived from the Greek word γεωργός (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γῆ (ge) meaning "earth" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GERARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Pronounced: ji-RAHRD(American English) JEHR-əd(British English) GHEH-rahrt(Dutch) zhə-RART(Catalan) GEH-rart(Polish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with hard meaning "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald [1], with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERDA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: GEHR-da(German) KHEHR-dah(Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GHYSLAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHEES-LEHN, GEE-LEHN
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Variant of GHISLAINE.
GIADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Italian form of JADE.
GIANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JAN-nee
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Italian short form of GIOVANNI.
GIANPIERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jam-PYEH-ro
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Combination of GIANNI and PIERO.
GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEHL(French) ji-ZEHL(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GIUSEPPE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-ZEHP-peh
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Italian form of JOSEPH. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) was a military leader who united Italy in the 19th century.
GLORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, German
Pronounced: GLAWR-ee-ə(English) GLO-rya(Spanish) GLAW-rya(Italian)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.

The name was introduced to the English-speaking world by E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel Gloria (1891) and George Bernard Shaw's play You Never Can Tell (1898), which both feature characters with a Portuguese background [1]. It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

GRADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-dee(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
GRANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GRAY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAY
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρύψ (grups).
GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the Old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sebros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GUNTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: GUWN-tu
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GWENDOLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
HADASSAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַסָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
HARRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-ee, HEHR-ee
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HEINRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIEN-rikh(German)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LAYN-ə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Latinate form of HELEN.
HOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOP
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
HOSEA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: הוֹשֵׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ho-ZAY-ə(English) ho-ZEE-ə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant English form of HOSHEA, though the name is spelled the same in the Hebrew text. Hosea is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Hosea. Written in the northern kingdom, it draws parallels between his relationship with his unfaithful wife and the relationship between God and his people.
HUGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HYOO
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic element hug meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.
HUGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-goo(Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
HUMPHREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUM-free
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca.
IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Scottish form of JOHN.
IDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: IE-də(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Dutch, Italian, Polish) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish) EE-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

IGNATIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by Emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
IMAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Indonesian
Other Scripts: إيمان(Arabic) ایمان(Persian)
Pronounced: ee-MAN(Arabic)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "faith", derived from Arabic أمُنَ (amuna) meaning "to be faithful". It is typically feminine in Arabic and typically masculine in Persian.
IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
The name of a princess in the play Cymbeline (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".
INDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English) ee-sa-AK(Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL(Spanish) ee-zu-BEHL(European Portuguese) ee-za-BEW(Brazilian Portuguese) IZ-ə-behl(English) EE-ZA-BEHL(French) ee-za-BEHL(German, Dutch)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: iz-ə-DAWR-ə
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
ISIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἶσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: IE-lə
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

IVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Other Scripts: Иван(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Іван(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: i-VAN(Russian) ee-WAHN(Ukrainian) EE-van(Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene) I-van(Czech) IE-vən(English) ee-VAN(Romanian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
JACINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kha-THEEN-ta(European Spanish) kha-SEEN-ta(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
JACOB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

JADE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD(English) ZHAD(French)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָעֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-əl(English) JAYL(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

This name has been used in England since the 13th century, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. In American name statistics (recorded since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it arguably the era's most consistently popular name. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States from 1940 to 1952.

Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JARED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יָרֶד, יֶרֶד(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAR-əd(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series The Big Valley [1].
JASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἰάσων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: JAY-sən(English) ZHA-ZAWN(French)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Ἰάσων (Iason) meaning "healer", derived from Greek ἰάομαι (iaomai) meaning "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָוָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-vən(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "Greece" in Hebrew, possibly related to ION (2). In the Old Testament this is the name of a grandson of Noah and the ancestor of the Greek peoples.
JAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-BYEHR
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of XAVIER.
JEANNINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHA-NEEN(French) jə-NEEN(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of JEANNE.
JEFFERSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHF-ər-sən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of JEFFREY". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
JEMIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְמִימָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JEREMY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JEHR-ə-mee(English) JEHR-mee(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Medieval English form of JEREMIAH, and the form used in some English versions of the New Testament.
JEROME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jə-ROM
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Ἱερώνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ἱερός (hieros) meaning "sacred" and ὄνομα (onoma) meaning "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century [1].
JESSAMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHS-ə-min
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of GILLIAN.
JIMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-MEH-na
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of XIMENA.
JIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 二郎(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: JEE-RO
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 二郎 (see JIRŌ).
JOAQUÍN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kho-a-KEEN, khwa-KEEN
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of JOACHIM.
JOCASTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἰοκάστη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: jo-KAS-tə(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἰοκάστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
JOCHEBED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹכֶבֶד(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹכֶבֶד (Yokheved) meaning "YAHWEH is glory". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother of Miriam, Aaron and Moses.
JOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOHANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, English, Late Roman
Pronounced: yo-HA-na(German) yuw-HA-na(Swedish) yo-HAHN-nah(Danish) yo-HAH-na(Dutch) YO-hawn-naw(Hungarian) YO-hahn-nah(Finnish) jo-HAN-ə(English) jo-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latinate form of Greek Ioanna (see JOANNA).
JOLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-LEEN
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the early 20th century. It received a boost in popularity after the release of Dolly Parton's 1973 song Jolene.
JONATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English) ZHAW-NA-TAHN(French) YO-na-tan(German)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote Gulliver's Travels and other works.

JONQUIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAHNG-kwəl
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
JORDAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSEPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: JO-sə-feen(English) yo-zeh-FEE-nə(German)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOI
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия(Russian) Юлія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə(English) YOO-lya(German, Danish, Polish) YOO-lee-ah(Swedish, Finnish) KHOO-lya(Spanish) YOO-lyi-yə(Russian) YOO-lee-a(Latin)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
JULIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German, Finnish, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech
Pronounced: YOO-lee-oos(Latin) JOO-lee-əs(English) YOO-lyuws(German) YOO-leews(Finnish) YOO-lyoos(Danish) YOO-lee-uys(Swedish) YOO-li-yuws(Czech)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Greek ἴουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

JUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOON
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUSTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: YUWS-tuws(German) JUS-təs(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Latin name meaning "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KATARZYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ka-ta-ZHI-na
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Polish form of KATHERINE.
KATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
KATHARINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin(English) KATH-rin(English) ka-ta-REE-nə(German)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
KENDALL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-dəl
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENDRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-drik
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENYON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, of uncertain meaning.
KERENZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of KERENSA.
KEZIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
LAETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, French
Pronounced: LEH-TEE-SYA(French)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Original form of LETITIA, as well as a French variant.
LARK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAHRK
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAUREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAURENCE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LAW-RAHNS
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə(English)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, who he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.

Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEIF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LAYF
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λέων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-ahn(English) LEH-awn(German, Polish, Slovene)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek λέων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: LEHN-ərd(English) LAY-o-nahrt(Dutch) LEH-o-nart(German) leh-AW-nart(Polish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
LEONORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Italian short form of ELEANOR.
LEOPOLD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: LEH-o-pawlt(German, Dutch) LEE-ə-pold(English) LEH-o-polt(Czech) LEH-aw-pawld(Slovak) leh-AW-pawlt(Polish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
LEVON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Լեւոն(Armenian)
Pronounced: leh-VAWN
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Armenian form of LEON. This was the name of several kings of Cilician Armenia, including the first king Levon I the Magnificent.
LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Pronounced: LEE-əm(English) LYAM(French)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Irish short form of WILLIAM. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017.
LIESEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEE-zəl
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
German diminutive of ELISABETH.
LILAC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LIE-lək
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LIOR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר(Hebrew)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
LISBET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Scandinavian short form of ELISABET.
LIV (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LEEV
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".
LLYWELYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: shə-WEH-lin(Welsh) loo-EHL-in(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Possibly a Welsh form of the old Celtic name Lugubelenus, a combination of the names of the gods LUGUS and BELENUS. Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against England.
LOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: LO-la(Spanish) LO-lə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of DOLORES.
LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LUCA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see LUKE). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see LUKE), as well as the form used in several other languages.
LUCIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEHN
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of LUCIEN.
LUCINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Literature
Pronounced: loo-SIN-də(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel Don Quixote (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play The Doctor in Spite of Himself (1666).
LUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: LOOK(English)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
English form of Latin Lucas, from the Greek name Λουκᾶς (Loukas) meaning "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.

Due to the saint's renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century alongside the Latin form Lucas. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the Star Wars movies, beginning in 1977.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LUZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOTH(European Spanish) LOOS(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".
LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδία(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Rating: 90% based on 3 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
LYUDMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Людмила(Russian, Bulgarian) Лыꙋдмила(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: lyuwd-MYEE-lə(Russian)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Russian and Bulgarian form of LUDMILA. This was the name of a character in Aleksandr Pushkin's poem Ruslan and Lyudmila (1820).
MABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's 1854 novel The Heir of Redclyffe [1], which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).
MACIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-see
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Variant of MACY.
MACK (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAK
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally a shortened form of various Gaelic surnames beginning with Mac or Mc (from Gaelic mac meaning "son"). It is also used as a generic slang term for a man.
MACKENZIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-KEHN-zee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-). In the United Kingdom it is more common as a masculine name.
MADELEINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish
Pronounced: MAD-LEHN(French) MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) mahd-eh-LEHN(Swedish)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
French form of MAGDALENE.
MADOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Welsh mad meaning "fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MAEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV(Irish)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
MAGDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Croatian, Romanian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Μάγδα(Greek)
Pronounced: MAK-da(German) MAHKH-dah(Dutch) MAG-da(Czech, Slovak, Polish) MAWG-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Short form of MAGDALENA.
MAI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 舞, 麻衣, 真愛, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MA-EE
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Japanese (mai) meaning "dance" or 麻衣 (mai) meaning "linen robe". It can also come from (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ai) meaning "love, affection". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
MÁIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MAH-ryə, MA-ryə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Irish form of MARY.
MAIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Combination of MAIR and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
MAKSIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Belarusian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Максим(Russian, Macedonian, Ukrainian) Максім(Belarusian)
Pronounced: muk-SYEEM(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Russian, Belarusian and Macedonian form of MAXIMUS, as well as an alternate transcription of Ukrainian Максим (see MAKSYM).
MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Scottish Gaelic Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρία(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian, Basque) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Combination of MARÍA and ISABEL.
MARIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: MA-REE(French) MA-ri-yeh(Czech) ma-REE(German) mə-REE(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
French and Czech form of MARIA. It has been very common in France since the 13th century. At the opening of the 20th century it was given to approximately 20 percent of French girls. This percentage has declined steadily over the course of the century, and it dropped from the top rank in 1958.

A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

In France it is occasionally used as a masculine name in pairings such as Jean-Marie.

MARIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-ee-əl, MAR-ee-əl
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of MARY influenced by MURIEL. In the case of actress Mariel Hemingway (1961-), the name is from the Cuban town of Mariel.
MARIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian
Pronounced: MA-ryo(Italian, Spanish, German)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of MARIUS. Famous bearers include American racecar driver Mario Andretti (1940-) and Canadian hockey player Mario Lemieux (1965-).
MARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Pronounced: ma-REE-za(Italian) ma-REE-sa(Spanish) mə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин, Мартын(Russian) Мартин(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin(English) MAR-TEHN(French) MAR-teen(German, Slovak) MAT-tin(Swedish) MAHT-tin(Norwegian) MAH-tseen(Danish) MAR-kyin(Czech) MAWR-teen(Hungarian) mar-TIN(Bulgarian) MAHR-teen(Finnish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make"). In the United States this name began to increase in popularity in the 1980s, likely because of its fashionable sound. It peaked in 2011, when it ranked as the second most popular name for boys.
MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) MAH-teel-dah(Finnish) MA-teel-da(Slovak)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was very popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song Waltzing Matilda, written in 1895.

MAXIMILIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Pronounced: mak-see-MEE-lyan(German) mak-sə-MIL-yən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
MAXWELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAKS-wehl
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
MAYBELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of MABEL.
MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play Pelléas et Mélisande (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MEREDITH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MIRABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIRANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: mi-RAN-də(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play The Tempest (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
MIRIAM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) mee-RYAM(Spanish) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
MONTGOMERY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mənt-GUM-ə-ree, mənt-GUM-ree
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MORGAN (1)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən(English) MAWR-GAN(French)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MOSES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מֹשֶׁה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MOZ-is(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh), which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10).

The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.

In England, this name has been commonly used by Christians since the Protestant Reformation, though it had long been popular among Jews.

MURPHY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: MUR-fee
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MYFANWY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "my woman" from the Welsh prefix my "my" combined with banw "woman".
NAAMAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נַעֲמָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAY-ə-mə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.
NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
NATASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Наташа(Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-shə(Russian) nə-TAHSH-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NATE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAYT
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of NATHAN or NATHANIEL.
NATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: נָתָן(Hebrew) Ναθάν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NAY-thən(English) NA-TAHN(French)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.

It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Nathan Hale (1755-1776), an American spy executed by the British during the American Revolution.

NATSUMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 夏美, 菜摘, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: NA-TSOO-MEE
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Japanese (natsu) meaning "summer" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsumi) meaning "pick, pluck". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NAVEED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Arabic
Other Scripts: نوید(Persian) نويد(Arabic)
Pronounced: na-WEED(Arabic)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Persian نوید or Arabic نويد (see NAVID).
NELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish
Pronounced: NEHL-ee(English) NEH-li(Swedish)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of NELL.
NICOLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NEE-KAW-LEHT
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of NICOLE.
NIKA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of NIKOLA (1).
NILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: நீலா(Tamil) नीला(Hindi)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
NINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Нина(Russian, Serbian) Ніна(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: NYEE-nə(Russian) NEE-na(Italian, German, Slovak) NEE-nə(English) NEE-NA(French) NEE-nah(Finnish) NYEE-na(Polish) NI-na(Czech)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NOAM
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, French
Other Scripts: נוֹעַם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAW-AM(French)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "pleasantness" in Hebrew. A famous bearer is Noam Chomsky (1928-), an American linguist and philosopher.
NOEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NOL, NO-əl
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
English form of NOËL or NOËLLE (rarely).
NORAH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NAWR-ə
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Variant of NORA (1).
NORMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Literature
Pronounced: NAWR-mə(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera Norma (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NORMAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the same source as the name NORMAN.
OCÉANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SEH-AN
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".
OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ə(English) ok-TA-bya(Spanish) ok-TA-wee-a(Latin)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
OISÍN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: aw-SHEEN(Irish) o-SHEEN(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
OKSANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Оксана(Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: uk-SA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Ukrainian form of XENIA.
OLGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gaw(Hungarian) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.
OLYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Оля(Russian)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of OLGA.
OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OSCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər(English) AWS-kar(Italian, Swedish) AWS-KAR(French)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson [1]. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

OTIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-tis
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of OTTO. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).
OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
PACÍFICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pa-THEE-fee-ka(European Spanish) pa-SEE-fee-ka(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Spanish feminine form of the Late Latin name Pacificus meaning "peacemaker".
PADMA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu
Other Scripts: पद्म, पद्मा(Sanskrit, Hindi) பத்மா(Tamil) ಪದ್ಮಾ(Kannada) పద్మా(Telugu)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form पद्मा and the masculine form पद्म. According to Hindu tradition a lotus holding the god Brahma arose from the navel of the god Vishnu. The name Padma is used in Hindu texts to refer to several characters, including the goddess Lakshmi and the hero Rama.
PÁDRAIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: PA-drək
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Irish form of PATRICK.
PAOLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PA-o-lo
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Paulus (see PAUL). Paolo Uccello and Paolo Veronese were both Italian Renaissance painters.
PARIS (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πάρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PA-REES(Classical Greek) PAR-is(English) PEHR-is(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Luwian or Hittite origin. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the Iliad, he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.
PARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: پریسا(Persian)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "like a fairy" in Persian.
PASCAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: PAS-KAL(French) pas-KAL(German) pahs-KAHL(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) meaning "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PASHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Паша(Russian)
Pronounced: PA-shə
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of PAVEL.
PASQUALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Italian feminine form of PASCAL.
PATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: PAT-rik(English) PA-TREEK(French) PA-trik(German)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Biblical
Pronounced: PAWL(English, French) POWL(German, Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PAVEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Павел(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: PA-vyil(Russian) PA-vehl(Czech)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian and Belarusian form of PAUL.
PAZ (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: PATH(European Spanish) PAS(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".
PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEH-NEH-LO-PEH(Classical Greek) pə-NEHL-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Probably derived from Greek πηνέλοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πήνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PERLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: PEHR-la
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər(English) PEH-tu(German) PEH-tər(Dutch, Danish, Slovene) PEH-tehr(Slovak)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek Πέτρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century [1].

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PETUNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: pə-TOON-yə
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the name of the flower, derived ultimately from a Tupi (South American) word.
PHILIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: FIL-ip(English) FEE-lip(Dutch)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Φίλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians, though it came to the West by the Middle Ages. It was borne by six kings of France and five kings of Spain. It was regularly used in England during the Middle Ages, although the Spanish king Philip II, who attempted an invasion of England, helped make it less common by the 17th century. It was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. Famous bearers include the Elizabethan courtier and poet Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) and the American science fiction novelist Philip K. Dick (1928-1982).

PHILIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), German
Pronounced: FI-li-pə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILOMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλομένα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in 1802 after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοίβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοίβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοῖβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHYLLIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FIL-i-də
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From Φυλλίδος (Phyllidos), the genitive form of PHYLLIS. This form was used in 17th-century pastoral poetry.
PIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: PEE-a(Italian, Swedish, Danish, German)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of PIUS.
PIERCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEERS
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name PIERS.
PIERRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Swedish
Pronounced: PYEHR(French)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of PETER. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PILAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pee-LAR
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.
PIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PIE-pər
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series Charmed, which debuted in 1998 [1].
PIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PIP-ə
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of PHILIPPA.
POLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Полина(Russian, Bulgarian) Поліна(Ukrainian) Πωλίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: pu-LYEE-nə(Russian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Either a Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Greek form of PAULINA or a short form of APOLLINARIYA.
POLLYANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: pahl-ee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Combination of POLLY and ANNA. This was the name of the main character in Eleanor H. Porter's novel Pollyanna (1913).
POPPY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAHP-ee
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
POSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PO-zee
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of JOSEPHINE. It can also be inspired by the English word posy for a bunch of flowers.
PRIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali
Other Scripts: प्रिया(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi) பிரியா(Tamil) ప్రియ(Telugu) പ്രിയാ(Malayalam) ಪ್ರಿಯಾ(Kannada) প্রিয়া(Bengali)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "beloved" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a daughter of King Daksha.
QUENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAHN-TEHN(French) KWEHN-tən(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.
RALEIGH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAW-lee, RAH-lee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English. A city in North Carolina bears this name, after the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618).
RALPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: RALF(English, German) RAYF(British English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RAMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Romanian, English
Pronounced: ra-MO-na(Spanish) rə-MON-ə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel Ramona (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.
RAOUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Italian
Pronounced: RA-OOL(French)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
French form of Radulf (see RALPH).
RAYEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche, Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "flower" in Mapuche.
REBECCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רִבְקָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: rə-BEHK-ə(English) reh-BEHK-ka(Italian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
RENATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: reh-NA-ta(Italian, Spanish, German, Polish) REH-na-ta(Czech)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of RENATUS.
RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

RHONWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Welsh form of ROWENA, appearing in medieval Welsh poems and stories. It also coincides with Welsh rhon "spear" and gwen "fair, white, blessed".
ROBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: Роберт(Russian)
Pronounced: RAHB-ərt(American English) RAWB-ət(British English) RAW-BEHR(French) RO-beht(Swedish) RO-behrt(German, Finnish, Czech) RO-bərt(Dutch) RAW-behrt(Polish) RO-byirt(Russian) roo-BEHRT(Catalan)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).

This name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actors Robert Redford (1936-), Robert De Niro (1943-) and Robert Downey Jr. (1965-).

ROBIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English) RAW-BEHN(French) RAW-bin(Dutch)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROCCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: RAWK-ko(Italian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Germanic name derived from the element hrok meaning "rest". This was the name of a 14th-century French saint who nursed victims of the plague but eventually contracted the disease himself. He is the patron saint of the sick.
RODERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish, Welsh
Pronounced: RAHD-ə-rik(English) RAHD-rik(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "famous ruler" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's 1811 poem The Vision of Don Roderick [1].
ROGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: RAHJ-ər(American English) RAWJ-ə(British English) RAW-ZHEH(French) roo-ZHEH(Catalan) RO-gu(German)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
RÓISÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ro-SHEEN
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Irish rós meaning "rose" (a cognate of ROSE).
ROSABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Combination of ROSA (1) and the popular name suffix bel. It was created in the 18th century.
ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHZ-ə-lind
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy As You Like It (1599).
ROSAMUND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RO-zə-mənd, RAHZ-ə-mənd
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ROSCOE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHS-ko
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, itself derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUFUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Pronounced: ROO-foos(Latin) ROO-fəs(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Roman cognomen meaning "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RUPERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: ROO-pehrt(German) RUY-pərt(Dutch) ROO-pərt(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
SABLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of SARAH.
SAGE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SALMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: سلمى(Arabic)
Pronounced: SAL-ma
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "safe", derived from Arabic سَلِمَ (salima) meaning "to be safe".
SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
SAPPHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Σαπφείρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Σαπφείρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
SAYEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "sweet, lovely" in Mapuche.
SCARLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Either a variant of SCARLETT or else from the English word for the red colour (both of the same origin, a type of cloth).
SCHEHERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SCHUYLER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804) [1].
SÉAMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEH-məs
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Irish form of JAMES.
SÉARLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAHR-las
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Irish form of CHARLES.
SEPTEMBER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sehp-TEHM-bər
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.
SERGEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Сергей(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: syir-GYAY(Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Сергей (see SERGEY).
SEVASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Севастьян(Russian)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Севастьян (see SEVASTYAN).
SHOSHANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Biblical Hebrew form of SUSANNA.
SIÂN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SHAN
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Welsh form of JEANNE.
SIDONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Georgian
Other Scripts: სიდონია(Georgian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This is the name of a legendary saint from Georgia. She and her father Abiathar were supposedly converted by Saint Nino from Judaism to Christianity.
SIOBHÁN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: shi-VAWN, SHI-wan
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Irish form of Jehanne, a Norman French variant of JEANNE.
SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SOLOMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה(Hebrew) Σολομών(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən(American English) SAWL-ə-mən(British English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.

This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish. It was however borne by an 11th-century Hungarian king.

SOPHIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SAW-FEE(French) SO-fee(English) zo-FEE(German) so-FEE(Dutch)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
French form of SOPHIA.
SORCHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: SAWR-ə-khə(Irish) SAWR-khə(Irish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "radiant" in Gaelic. It is sometimes used as an Irish form of Sarah.
SORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from Romanian soare meaning "sun".
STEFAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Стефан(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: SHTEH-fan(German) STEH-fahn(Dutch) STEH-fan(Polish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Form of STEPHEN in used several languages.
STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
SUNNIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
SUSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Сусанна(Russian) שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew) Сꙋсанна(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-na(Italian) soo-ZAN-nə(Catalan) suy-SAN-na(Swedish) SOO-sahn-nah(Finnish) suw-SAN-nə(Russian) suy-SAH-na(Dutch) soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From Σουσάννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

SVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SVEHN(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn meaning "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
TABITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ταβιθά(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAB-i-thə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show Bewitched, in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
TADHG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: TIEG(Irish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "poet" in Irish. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Connacht.
TAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of TALIA (2).
TALIESIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: tal-YEH-sin(Welsh) tal-ee-EHS-in(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet and bard. In later Welsh legends he is portrayed as a wizard and prophet, or as a companion of King Arthur.
TALULLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Gaelic name Tuilelaith, which was derived from Irish tuile "abundance" and flaith "princess".
TAMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: תָּמָר(Hebrew) თამარ(Georgian)
Pronounced: TAHM-ahr(English) TAY-mahr(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "date palm" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.
TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-zin
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TARQUIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: TAHR-kwin(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Tarquinius, a Roman name of unknown meaning, possibly Etruscan in origin. This was the name of two early kings of Rome.
TASOULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Τασούλα(Greek)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Greek diminutive of ANASTASIA.
TEMPERANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
TENNYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHN-ə-sən
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that meant "son of Tenney", Tenney being a medieval form of DENIS. A notable bearer of the surname was British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).
TESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TEHS-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of THERESA.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THIERRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: TYEH-REE
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
French form of THEODORIC.
THORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
TILLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIL-ee
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of MATILDA.
TREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAY
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English nickname meaning "three".
TYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIE-sən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that could be derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand". Alternatively, it could be a variant of DYSON. A famous bearer of the surname was boxer Mike Tyson (1966-).
VALENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Latvian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) Βαλεντίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-na(Italian) və-lyin-TYEE-nə(Russian) ba-lehn-TEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian, Belarusian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the name of the city in Italy, which is itself of unknown meaning.
VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VICTOIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEEK-TWAR
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
French form of VICTORIA.
VICTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Pronounced: VIK-tər(English) VEEK-TAWR(French)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables.
VICTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-yo-la(Czech)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIRGINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Βιργινία(Greek)
Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə(English) veer-JEE-nya(Italian) beer-KHEE-nya(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

VIVEKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Swedish form of WIEBKE.
VIVIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEHN
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of VIVIANA.
VLADIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владимир(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: vlu-DYEE-myir(Russian) VLA-dee-meer(Serbian, Croatian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
WILHELMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German (Rare), English
Pronounced: vil-hehl-MEE-na(Dutch, German) wil-ə-MEEN-ə(English) wil-hehl-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).
WILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).

This name was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia. Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero (called Wilhelm in German, Guillaume in French and Guglielmo in Italian). In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

In the American rankings (since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it one of the most consistently popular names (although it has never reached the top rank). In modern times its short form, Liam, has periodically been more popular than William itself, in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and the United States in the 2010s.

WILLOUGHBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIL-ə-bee
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-ə-frid(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
YASMIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Hebrew, Urdu, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: ياسمين(Arabic) יַסְמִין(Hebrew) یاسمین(Urdu)
Pronounced: yas-MEEN(Arabic) YAZ-min(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "jasmine" in Arabic and Hebrew, derived from Persian یاسمین (yasamin). In modern times it has been used in the western world, as an Arabic-influenced variant of JASMINE.
YURI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-REE
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Japanese 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
YVONNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EE-VAWN(French) i-VAHN(English) ee-VAWN(German) ee-VAW-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of YVON. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
ZAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زيدة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIE-dah
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ZAYD.
ZEBEDEE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ζεβεδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHB-ə-dee(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Ζεβεδαῖος (Zebedaios), the Greek form of ZEBADIAH used in the New Testament, where it refers to the father of the apostles James and John.
ZENOBIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDEH-NO-BEE-A(Classical Greek) zə-NO-bee-ə(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "life of Zeus", derived from Greek Ζηνός (Zenos) meaning "of ZEUS" and βίος (bios) meaning "life". This was the name of a 3rd-century queen of Palmyra. After claiming the title Queen of the East and expanding her realm into Roman territory she was defeated by Emperor Aurelian. Her Greek name was used as an approximation of her native Aramaic name.
ZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
ZOYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Зоя(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ZO-yə(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian and Bulgarian form of ZOE.
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