deerskulls's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately derived from Greek ἀκή (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
ACHILLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀχιλλεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-KIL-eez(English) a-KEEL-lehs(Latin)
From the Greek Ἀχιλλεύς (Achilleus), which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek ἄχος (achos) meaning "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's Iliad. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.

This name was sometimes used as a personal name, and was borne by a few early saints, including a Roman soldier martyred with Nereus in the 1st century.

AERIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English
Pronounced: ER-is
Variant of AERITH, due to translation confusion. It may also be considered a variant of ERIS.
ALAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə
Variant of ALANA, probably influenced by ELAINE.
ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dree-ə
Variant of ALEXANDRIA.
ALISTAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALLISON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-i-sən
From the middle of the 20th century this has primarily been used as a variant of the feminine name ALISON. However, prior to that it was used as an uncommon masculine name, derived from the English and Scottish surname ALLISON.
ALOYSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-o-ISH-əs
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
AMALTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀμάλθεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: am-əl-THEE-ə(English)
From the Greek Ἀμάλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθάσσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a nymph (in some sources a goat) who nursed the infant Zeus.
AMARANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Ἀμάραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
AMARYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: am-ə-RIL-is(English)
Derived from Greek ἀμαρύσσω (amarysso) meaning "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem Eclogues [1]. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər(English) AHM-bər(Dutch)
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
AMBROSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀμβροσία(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).
AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
ANABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-na-BEHL
Spanish form of ANNABEL.
ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασία(Greek) Анастасия(Russian) Анастасія(Ukrainian, Belarusian) ანასტასია(Georgian) Ἀναστασία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-na-sta-SEE-a(Greek) u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə(Russian) u-nu-stu-SYEE-yu(Ukrainian) an-ə-STAY-zhə(English) a-na-STA-sya(Spanish) a-na-STA-zya(Italian) A-NA-STA-SEE-A(Classical Greek)
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANDROMEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομέδα, Ἀνδρομέδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANNABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: an-na-BEHL-la(Italian) an-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Latinate form of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLA.
APRIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-prəl
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
ARCHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-chər
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ARIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀριάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" and ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-RYEHL
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: A-ree-ehs(Latin) EHR-eez(English)
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
ARLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-lo
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
ARTEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἄρτεμις(Ancient Greek) Άρτεμις(Greek)
Pronounced: AR-TEH-MEES(Classical Greek) AHR-tə-mis(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
ARYA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AHR-yə(English)
Created by author George R. R. Martin for a popular character in his series A Song of Ice and Fire, published beginning 1996, and the television adaptation Game of Thrones (2011-2019). In the story Arya is the second daughter of Ned Stark, the lord of Winterfell.
ASPEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀστραία(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀστραία (Astraia), derived from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
ATLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄτλας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TLAS(Classical Greek) AT-ləs(English)
Possibly means "enduring" from Greek τλάω (tlao) meaning "to endure". In Greek mythology he was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
ATREYU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature (Anglicized)
Pronounced: ə-TRAY-oo
Anglicized variant of ATRÉJU, which was created by German author Michael Ende for the hero of his fantasy novel 'Die unendliche Geschichte' (1979; English: 'The Neverending Story'). The character is a boy warrior whose name is explained as meaning "son of all" in his fictional native language, given to him because he was raised by all of the members of his village after being orphaned as a newborn.

Current usage is influenced by the name of a Californian metal-core band named after the hero in 'The neverending story'.

ATTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
AUBERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-bər-ahn
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.
AUGUST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS. This was the name of three Polish kings.

As an English name it can also derive from the month of August, which was named for the Roman emperor Augustus.

AUGUSTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-toos(Latin) aw-GUS-təs(English) ow-KHUYS-tus(Dutch)
Means "exalted, venerable", derived from Latin augere meaning "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. In 26 BC the senate officially gave him the name Augustus, and after his death it was used as a title for subsequent emperors. This was also the name of three kings of Poland (August in Polish).
AURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AUTUMN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
AVALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AV-ə-lien, AV-ə-leen
Variant of AVELINE.
AVERY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
From a surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AZALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə
From the name of the flower (shrubs of the genus Rhododendron), ultimately derived from Greek ἀζαλέος (azaleos) meaning "dry".
AZURE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AZH-ər
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BAILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BAMBI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAM-bee
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel Bambi (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
BARRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: bar-rick
Transferred use of the surname BARRICK.
BASIL (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAZ-əl
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: BAS-tyan
Short form of SEBASTIAN.
BEATRISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian
Latvian form of BEATRIX.
BEATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-triks(German) BEH-a-triks(German) BEH-aw-treeks(Hungarian) BEH-ya-triks(Dutch) BEE-ə-triks(English) BEE-triks(English)
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.

In England the name became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, more commonly in the spelling Beatrice. Famous bearers include the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit, and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (1938-).

BEAU
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BO(English)
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.

BEAUREGARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-rə-gahrd
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
BEDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Irish diminutive of BRIDGET.
BELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bə-LIN-də
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related to Italian bella "beautiful". The second element could be Germanic lind meaning "flexible, soft, tender" (and by extension "snake, serpent"). This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem The Rape of the Lock (1712).
BELLATRIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
BELPHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Combination of belle "beautiful" and the name PHOEBE. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
BEOWULF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Pronounced: BAY-ə-wuwlf(English)
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BETHANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee
Variant of BETHANY.
BETRYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BEHT-rees
Welsh form of BEATRICE.
BEVERLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHV-ər-lee
Variant of BEVERLY.
BIJOUX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Plural of the French word bijou, meaning "jewels". It is not used as a given name in France.
BINDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous Australian, Nyungar
Pronounced: Bind-ee(Indigenous Australian)
Means "butterfly" from the word bindi-bindi in Nyungar, spoken in Western Australian near Perth.

It could also mean "little girl" in other southern Australian languages.

Bindi Cole (1975-) is a new media artist and writer while Bindi Sue Irwin is the daughter of Steve Irwin (1962-2006) known as "The Crocodile Hunter".

Bindi is also the informal name of Soliva sessilis, a weedy plant known for its tiny sharp-needled seeds originate from Southern Australia.

BISHOP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BISH-əp
Either from the English occupational surname, or else directly from the English word. It is ultimately derived from Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer".
BJORN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Variant of BJÖRN or BJØRN used outside of Scandinavia and Germany.
BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEHZ
From the Roman name Blasius, which was derived from Latin blaesus meaning "lisping". A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BLANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: BLANG-ka(Spanish) BLANG-kə(Catalan)
Spanish and Catalan cognate of BLANCHE.
BLYTHE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLIEDH
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
BONIFACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English (Rare)
Pronounced: BAW-NEE-FAS(French) BAHN-ə-fəs(English) BAHN-ə-fays(English)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.
BOSTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: BOS-tən(American English) BAH-stən(American English)
From Boston, the name is said to be literally "BOTOLPH's Stone," probably from the name of some Anglo-Saxon landowner (Old English BOTWULF).
BRAEDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRAY-dən
Variant of BRADEN.
BRANDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-dee
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRANT
From a surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name BRANDR. This is also the name for a variety of wild geese.
BRIAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRIAR-ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: BRIE-ər-ROZ
The real name of the fairy tale character Sleeping Beauty, i.e., the title character in the Brothers Grimm tale 'Little Briar-Rose', which comes from a combination of BRIAR and ROSE (referring to the bloom of a wild rose bush, or (allegorically) "a rose among thorns"). This is a translation of Dornröschen, composed of German dorn "thorn" and rose "rose" combined with the diminutive suffix -chen.
BRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: bree-EHL
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare), Popular Culture, Literature
Variant of BRIANNE. This is the name of a character in George R. R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series, as well as the TV show based on the books 'Game of Thrones'. Martin did not originate this form, though, for it was in use in the United States well before the first book in the series was published in 1996.
BRIONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
Variant of BRYONY.
BRISEIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Βρισηΐς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: brie-SEE-is(English)
Patronymic derived from Βρισεύς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
BRISEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
The name of a witch in Arthurian legend. One theory connects it to Old Norse brisinga "glowing, twinkling" (a word-forming element associated with Freya's famous necklace, the brísingamen).
BRISTOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIS-təl
From the name of the city in southwest England that means "the site of the bridge".
BROOKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BRYCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIES
Variant of BRICE.
BRYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIE-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BUCK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUK
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUNNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of BUNNY.
BURTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUR-tən
From a surname that was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
BYRNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BURN
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
CAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קָיִן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAYN(English)
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALYPSO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλυψώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIP-so(English)
From Greek Καλυψώ (Kalypso), which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλύπτω (kalypto) meaning "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CANDICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAN-dis
Variant of CANDACE.
CAPRICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CAPRICE.
CARLYLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kahr-LIEL
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ee, KEHR-ee
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CASH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KASH
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
CASSIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
Pronounced: KASH-ən(English)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CASSIOPEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιόπεια, Κασσιέπεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kas-ee-ə-PEE-ə(English)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιόπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιέπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CASSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-oos(Latin) KASH-əs(English) KAS-ee-əs(English)
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CEDAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEE-dər
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κέδρος (kedros).
CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHD-rik
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886).
CELESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CERSEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
This name appears in "A song of ice and fire" by George R.R. Martin. At the beginning, Cersei Lannister is the wife of the king Robert Baratheon.
This name comes from the enchantress CIRCE in Greek mythology.
CHELSEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHL-see
From the name of a district in London, originally derived from Old English and meaning "landing place for chalk or limestone". It has been in general use as an English given name since the 1970s.
CHERUBINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Italian, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of CHERUBINO.
CHEYENNE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: shie-AN
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own. As a given name, it has been in use since the 1950s.
CHRISTABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-behl
Variant of CHRISTABEL.
CHRYSEIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χρυσηΐς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KRUY-SEH-EES(Classical Greek) krie-SEE-is(English)
Patronymic derived from CHRYSES. In Greek legend she was the daughter of Chryses, a priest of Apollo. After she was taken prisoner by the Greeks besieging Troy, Apollo sent a plague into their camp, forcing the Greeks to release her.
CIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KYEE-ən(Irish)
Means "ancient" in Irish. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CIRCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κίρκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SUR-see(English)
Latinized form of Greek Κίρκη (Kirke), possibly from κίρκος (kirkos) meaning "hawk". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs, as told in Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus forced her to change them back, then stayed with her for a year before continuing his voyage.
CLAUDE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLOD(French) KLAWD(English)
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLÉMENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLEH-MAHN-TEEN
French feminine form of CLEMENT. This is also the name of a variety of orange (fruit).
CLOVER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
CONSTANZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kons-TAN-tha(European Spanish) kons-TAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Spanish form of CONSTANTIA.
CORAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: KAWR-əl(English) ko-RAL(Spanish)
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοράλλιον (korallion).
COSMOS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAHZ-mos
After the English word for the universe, and also the name of a garden flower.
CYPRESS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: SIE-pris
From the English word cypress, a group of coniferous trees. Ultimately from Greek kuparissos.
DAEDALUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δαίδαλος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEHD-ə-ləs(English) DEED-ə-ləs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Δαίδαλος (Daidalos), which was derived from δαιδάλλω (daidallo) meaning "to work cunningly". In Greek myth Daedalus was an Athenian inventor who was banished to Crete. There he designed the Labyrinth for King Minos, but he and his son Icarus were eventually imprisoned inside it because he had aided Theseus in his quest against the Minotaur. Daelalus and Icarus escaped using wings fashioned from wax, but Icarus fell from the sky to his death.
DAENERYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Created by author George R. R. Martin for a character in his series A Song of Ice and Fire, first published 1996, and the television adaptation Game of Thrones (2011-2019). An explanation for the meaning of her name is not provided, though it is presumably intended to be of Valyrian origin. In the series Daenerys Targaryen is a queen of the Dothraki and a claimant to the throne of Westeros.
DAFFODIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAF-ə-dil
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-zee
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DAKOTA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
From the name of the Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley, or from the two American states that were named for them: North and South Dakota (until 1889 unified as the Dakota Territory). The tribal name means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language.
DALLAS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAL-əs
From a surname that could either be of Old English origin meaning "valley house" or of Scottish Gaelic origin meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George M. Dallas (1792-1864).
DAMASCUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Other Scripts: דרמשק, דמשק(Hebrew) ܕܪܡܣܘܩ(Syriac)
The name of Damascus first appeared in the geographical list of Thutmose III as T-m-ś-q in the 15th century BC. The etymology of the ancient name "T-m-ś-q" is uncertain, but it is suspected to be pre-Semitic. It is attested as Dimašqa in Akkadian, T-ms-ḳw in Egyptian, Dammaśq (דמשק) in Old Aramaic and Dammeśeq (דמשק) in Biblical Hebrew. The Akkadian spelling is found in the Amarna letters, from the 14th century BC. Later Aramaic spellings of the name often include an intrusive resh (letter r), perhaps influenced by the root dr, meaning "dwelling". Thus, the Qumranic Darmeśeq (דרמשק), and Darmsûq (ܕܪܡܣܘܩ) in Syriac. The English and Latin name of the city is "Damascus" which was imported from Greek: Δαμασκός, which originated in Aramaic: ‎ דרמשק; "a well-watered place". In Arabic, the city is called Dimashqu sh-Shām (دمشق الشام), although this is often shortened to either Dimashq or ash-Shām by the citizens of Damascus, of Syria and other Arab neighbors and Turkey (as Şam). Ash-Shām is an Arabic term for "Levant" and for "Syria"; the latter, and particularly the historical region of Syria, is called Bilādu sh-Shām (بلاد الشام / "land of the Levant").
DANTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-teh
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the Divine Comedy.
DAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWN
From the English word dawn, ultimately derived from Old English dagung.
DEAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DIR-drə(English) DIR-dree(English) DYEHR-dryə(Irish)
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from Old Irish der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' Deirdre (1907) and J. M. Synge's Deirdre of the Sorrows (1910).

DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
DENZEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: dehn-ZEHL
Possibly a variant of DENZIL. This spelling of the name was popularized by American actor Denzel Washington (1954-), who was named after his father.
DESIREE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dehz-i-RAY
English form of DÉSIRÉE. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the movie Désirée (1954).
DIAMOND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DIE-mənd
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DIONYSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical
Other Scripts: Διονύσιος(Ancient Greek)
Latin form of DIONYSIOS. Dionysius the Areopagite, who is mentioned in the New Testament, was a judge converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. This was also the name of many other early saints, including a 3rd-century pope.
DIOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
After the surname of French fashion designer Christian Dior (1905-1957). His surname may be derived from French d'or meaning "of gold", but a relation to a first name of Greek origin that contains the element dios "of ZEUS" (such as DIONYSIUS) is also possible.
DRACO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δράκων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DRAY-ko(English)
From the Greek name Δράκων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRUELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Feminine version of the masculine abbreviated form of ANDREW, DREW. It is also the name of Druella Black (née Rosier) –wife of Cygnus Black, mother of Bellatrix, Andromeda and Narcissa Black - out of the Harry Potter series of books by J.K. Rowling.
EBONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHB-ən-ee
From the English word ebony for the black wood that comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
ECLIPSE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EE-clips
From the English word eclipse; a solar eclipse is when the sun and moon are aligned exactly so that the moon cats a great shadow over the Earth; a lunar eclipse is when the moon is right in front of the sun, showing only a bright slither of light. Used rarely as a given name, but it is indeed used, as familysearch.org can verify.
EDEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: עֵדֶן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-dən(English)
Possibly from Hebrew עֵדֶן ('eden) meaning "pleasure, delight", or perhaps derived from Sumerian 𒂔 (edin) meaning "plain". According to the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
ELAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-LAYN-ə
Variant of ELAINE.
ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek) Ἠλίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: EHL-ə(English) EHL-lah(Finnish)
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.
ELLARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English, English
Variant of ELARIA.
ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

ELSDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ELZ-dən
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Elli's valley" in Old English.
ELUNED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ehl-IN-ehd, ehl-EEN-ehd
Derived from Welsh eilun meaning "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.
ELWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-wuwd
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "elder tree forest" in Old English.
ELWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-win
Variant of ALVIN.
EMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-bər
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
EMERALD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-ə-rəld
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμάραγδος (smaragdos).
EMERY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, now typically feminine, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-lee
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

This name was moderately popular through most of the 20th century, and became very popular around the turn of the 21st century. It was the highest ranked name for girls in the United States from 1996 to 2007, attaining similar levels in other English-speaking countries around the same time.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), known for the novel Wuthering Heights, and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMANUELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MA-NWEHL
French feminine form of EMMANUEL.
EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
ENYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EHN-yə
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ÉOMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: Ay-o-mund
Means "horse protector" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Éomund is the father of ÉOWYN and ÉOMER.
ÉOWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win(English)
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
EPIPHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: i-PIF-ə-nee
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) that commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek ἐπιφάνεια (epiphaneia) meaning "manifestation".
EPONINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: EHP-ə-neen(English)
Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel Les Misérables (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.
ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESPEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Variant of ASBJØRN.
ESTEBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-TEH-ban
Spanish form of STEPHEN.
ESTELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL-ə
Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
ESTELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL(English) EHS-TEHL(French)
From an Old French name meaning "star", ultimately derived from Latin stella. It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
ESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Ἐσθήρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

ETHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən(English) EH-TAN(French)
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUPHRASIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UU-FRA-ZEE
French form of EUPHRASIA.
EUPHROSYNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐφροσύνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FRAH-si-nee(English)
Means "mirth, merriment" in Greek. She was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUROPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐρώπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yuw-RO-pə(English)
Latinized form of Greek Εὐρώπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.
EUSTACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Feminine form of EUSTACE.
EVANDER (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər, ə-VAN-dər
Anglicized form of IOMHAR.
EVANDRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Latin variant of EVANDER (1).
EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Means "good news" from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1847 epic poem Evangeline [1][2]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVELYN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EZRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
FALLON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera Dynasty.
FANCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAN-see
From the English word fancy, which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαίνω (phaino) meaning "to show, to appear".
FAUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FOW-na(Latin) FAW-nə(English)
Feminine form of FAUNUS. Fauna was a Roman goddess of fertility, women and healing, a daughter and companion of Faunus.
FAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWN
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FAYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Variant of FAY.
FERNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FURN
Variant of FERN.
FFION
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: FEE-awn, FI-awn
Means "foxglove" in Welsh.
FLEUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR(French, Dutch) FLUR(English)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(German, Spanish) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLOWER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLOW-ər
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FORD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWRD
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "ford" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
FORREST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWR-ist
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie Forrest Gump (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
FORTUNE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAWR-TUYN(French) FAWR-chən(English)
Simply from the word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
FOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FREYJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: FRAY-ya(Icelandic) FRAY-ə(English)
Icelandic and Old Norse form of FREYA.
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GARDENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: gahr-DEEN-ee-ə
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAR-əth(English)
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GARNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of GARNET (1).
GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in(English)
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GENEVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-veev
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GERALT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: GE-rahlt
Variant of GERALD used by Andrzej Sapkowski, a Polish writer, in the Witcher series. Geralt of Rivia (Geralt z Rivii) is the name of the main character.
GINGER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-jər
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEHL(French) ji-ZEHL(English)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GREY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY
Variant of GRAY.
GREYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Variant of GRAYSON.
GRIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRIR(English)
From a surname that was a variant of GREER.
GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρύψ (grups).
GWENDOLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
HALEIGH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALLBJÖRN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of HALLBJǪRN.
HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, German, Dutch, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה(Hebrew) حنّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə(English) HA-na(German) HAH-na(Dutch) HAN-nah(Arabic)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation, unlike the vernacular forms Anne and Ann and the Latin form Anna, which were used from the late Middle Ages. In the last half of the 20th century Hannah surged in popularity and neared the top of the name rankings for both the United States and the United Kingdom.

HAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-vən
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HEAVEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HEHV-ən
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HEIDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: HIE-dee(German, English) HAY-dee(Finnish)
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel Heidi (1880) by the Swiss author Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LAYN-ə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Latinate form of HELEN.
HELLENORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Pronounced: HEL-en-or(English)
Borne by a character in Edmund Spenser's 1590 masterpiece, The Faerie Queene.
Hellenore is the young and beautiful wife of an old miser, Malbecco. Hellenore's name is very likely meant to be an elaboration of the name HELEN, as the text implies a connection between Hellenore and Helen of Troy.
HERMIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑρμιόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-MEE-O-NEH(Classical Greek) hər-MIE-ə-nee(English)
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HOLLAND
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: HAH-lənd(American English)
From the name of geographic places called Holland, or from surname HOLLAND.

The surname is derived from any of the eight villages named Holland, located in the counties of Essex, Lancaster and Lincoln, England. The name of the villages means "ridge land" in Old English.

The name of the region in the Netherlands is probably from Old Dutch holt lant "wood land" describing the district around Dordrecht.

HONEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HUN-ee
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
HYACINTH (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see HYACINTHUS).
IDONEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century [1].
IDONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA.
ILEANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-LYA-na(Romanian)
Possibly a Romanian variant of ELENA. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
ILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ηλιάνα(Greek) Илиана(Bulgarian)
Feminine form of ILIAS (Greek) or ILIYA (Bulgarian).
INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-AW(Classical Greek) IE-o(English)
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
IRELAND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: IER-lənd
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRVINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: UR-vien(English) UR-vin(English)
Variant of IRVING.
ISABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-ZA-BEHL(French) IZ-ə-behl(English) ee-za-BEH-lə(German) ee-sah-BEHL-lə(Dutch)
French form of ISABEL.
ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: IE-lə
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

ISRAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: יִשְׂרָאֵל(Hebrew) Ἰσραήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IZ-ray-əl(English) IZ-ree-əl(English)
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contends", from the roots שָׂרָה (sarah) meaning "to contend, to fight" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament, Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
IVORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: IE-və-ree(English) IEV-ree(English)
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance that comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.
IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name JACQUES [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

JACKSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
JARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: JAR-əth(English)
Probably a blend of JARED and GARETH. This was the name of the Goblin King, played by David Bowie, in the movie Labyrinth (1986).
JASMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAZ-min(English) ZHAS-MEEN(French)
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived via Arabic from Persian یاسمین (yasamin), which is also a Persian name.
JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָוָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-vən(English)
Means "Greece" in Hebrew, possibly related to ION (2). In the Old Testament this is the name of a grandson of Noah and the ancestor of the Greek peoples.
JAYDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAYD
Variant of JADE.
JENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Finnish
Pronounced: JEHN-ə(English) YEHN-nah(Finnish)
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series Dallas [1].
JESCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יִסְכָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Variation of ISCAH. A daughter of HARAN, sister of Lot and MILCAH according to Genesis 11:29. She is sometimes identified as SARAH. Genesis 11:27-30. Original version, Yiskāh means "foresight."
JEWEL
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOO-əl, JOOL
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JOCERAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval French
From the Germanic element gaut "Geat, Goth" (and possibly influenced by Latin gaudium "joy, delight") combined with hramn "raven".
JOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-LEEN
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the early 20th century. It received a boost in popularity after the release of Dolly Parton's 1973 song Jolene.
JORDYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
JOSEPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: JO-sə-feen(English) yo-zeh-FEE-nə(German)
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JUDAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἰούδας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: JOO-dəs(English)
From Ἰούδας (Ioudas), the Greek form of JUDAH. This is the name of several characters in the New Testament including the infamous Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus to the Jewish authorities in exchange for money.
JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия(Russian) Юлія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə(English) YOO-lya(German, Danish, Polish) YOO-lee-ah(Swedish, Finnish) KHOO-lya(Spanish) YOO-lyi-yə(Russian) YOO-lee-a(Latin)
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUNO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: YOO-no(Latin) JOO-no(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
JUPITER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOO-pi-tər(English)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
JUSTICE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JUS-tis
From an occupational surname meaning "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN(French) jus-TEEN(English)
French form of Iustina (see JUSTINA). This is the name of the heroine in the novel Justine (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KALLISTO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Καλλιστώ(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek κάλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful", a derivative of καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.
KAZIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Казимир(Russian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: kə-zyi-MYEER(Russian)
Russian, Slovene and Croatian form of CASIMIR.
KINGSLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KINGZ-lee
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
KLAUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
Pronounced: KLOWS(German, Finnish)
German short form of NICHOLAS.
KRONOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κρόνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KRO-NOS(Classical Greek)
Greek form of CRONUS.
KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LEANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λέανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λέανδρος (Leandros), derived from λέων (leon) meaning "lion" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
LEANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dra(Spanish)
Feminine form of LEANDER.
LEANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lee-AN-ə
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA [1].
LEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-ə(English)
Form of LEAH used in the Greek Old Testament. This is the name of a princess in the Star Wars movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.
LEONIDAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λεωνίδας(Greek)
Derived from Greek λέων (leon) meaning "lion" combined with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life and his army defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.
LEVI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: לֵוִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-vie(English) LEH:-vee(Dutch)
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. This name also occurs in the New Testament, where it is another name for the apostle Matthew.

As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

LILAC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LIE-lək
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LILIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian, Bulgarian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian cognate of LILY.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LIRIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Leiriope, which literally means "the face of leirion". Leirion was another name that the ancient Greeks had for the daffodil flower. In Greek mythology, Liriope was the name of a nymph.
LOLITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: lo-LEE-ta
Diminutive of LOLA.
LONDON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LUN-dən
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
LOTUS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LO-təs
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτός (lotos). In Greek and Roman mythology the lotus tree was said to produce a fruit causing sleepiness and forgetfulness.
LOURDES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOORD(French) LOORDZ(English)
From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.
LOVISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: loo-VEE-sah
Swedish feminine form of LOUIS.
LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see LUKE), as well as the form used in several other languages.
LUCIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical, English
Pronounced: LOO-kee-oos(Latin) LOO-shəs(English) LOO-si-əs(English)
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was derived from Latin lux "light". This was the most popular of the praenomina. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known simply as Seneca), a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius. Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance.
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LUNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Archaic)
Means "little moon" in Medieval French. It is derived from French lune "moon" combined with a diminutive suffix. So, in other words, one could say that this name is the diminutive form of LUNE.
LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
LYSANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύσανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λύσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.
MADISON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-i-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie Splash (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. It was ranked second for girls in the United States by 2001. This rise from obscurity to prominence in only 18 years represents an unprecedented 550,000 percent increase in usage.

A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president.

MAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was the American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
MARGAUX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Variant of MARGOT influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρία(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian, Basque) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIGOLD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make"). In the United States this name began to increase in popularity in the 1980s, likely because of its fashionable sound. It peaked in 2011, when it ranked as the second most popular name for boys.
MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHD-o
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-dee
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μέλος (melos) meaning "song" combined with ἀείδω (aeido) meaning "to sing".
MERCURY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MURK-yə-ree(English)
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system and a metallic chemical element, both named for the god.
MERCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-see
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
MERLYN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-lin
Variant of MERLIN, sometimes used as a feminine form. It has perhaps been influenced by the Welsh word merlyn meaning "pony".
MICAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə(English)
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. This is also the name of a separate person in the Book of Judges, the keeper of an idol. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICAIAH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מִיכָיָהוּ, מִיכָיְהוּ, מִיכָיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mie-KAY-ə(English) mi-KIE-ə(English)
Means "who is like YAHWEH?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament in a variety of Hebrew spellings, belonging to both males and females. It is the full name of Micah, both the prophet and the man from the Book of Judges. As a feminine name it belongs to the mother of King Abijah (at 2 Chronicles 13:2), though her name is listed as Maacah in other passages.
MIETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: MEE-YET
Old diminutive form of MARGUERITE.

In this day and age, however, it coincides with the French word miette "crumb" (which is also used as a term of endearment for children).

MILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used as an Anglicized form of Maoilios.

MILLICENT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-i-sənt
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MINERVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English)
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MORDECAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי, מָרְדְּכַי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie(English)
Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
MORGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Earlier form of MORGAN (2).
MORPHEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μορφεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MOR-PEWS(Classical Greek) MAWR-fee-əs(English)
Derived from Greek μορφή (morphe) meaning "shape", referring to the shapes seen in dreams. In Greek mythology Morpheus was the god of dreams.
MORRIGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MORTIMER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAWR-tə-mər
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.
MYCA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Variant of MICA and MICAH
NARCISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: nahr-SIS-ə(English)
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NASH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: NASH
From a surname that was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015). The name was popularized in the 1990s by the television series Nash Bridges.
NEREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: neh-REH-a
Variant of NERE.
NEVAEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: nə-VAY-ə
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000. Over the next few years it rapidly climbed the rankings in America, peaking at the 25th rank for girls in 2010.
NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
NÍVEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian), Literature
From Latin niveus meaning "snow-white" (itself from nix "snow" (genitive nivis)). It was used by author Isabel Allende for a character in her Spanish-language novel La casa de los espíritus (1982).
NOAH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: נֹחַ, נוֹחַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-ə(English) NO-a(German)
From the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, repose", derived from the root נוּחַ (nuach). According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the Great Flood. After the flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans. In the United States it quickly increased in popularity beginning in the 1990s, eventually becoming the most popular name for boys between 2013 and 2016.

A famous bearer was the American lexicographer Noah Webster (1758-1843).

NOCTURNE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAHK-turn
From the word invented by composer John Field to refer to a piece of music evocative of or appropriate to the night.
NOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: no-EHL
English form of NOËLLE.
NORAH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NAWR-ə
Variant of NORA (1).
NORWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAWR-wuwd
From a surname that was originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOVEMBER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: nov-EHM-ber
From the Latin word novem, meaning "nine". November was the ninth month of the Roman calendar before January and February were added around 713 BC.
It is now the eleventh month of the year.
NYMPHAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: nim-FAY-ə
Latin for "water lily"
OCÉANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SEH-AN
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".
OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ə(English) ok-TA-bya(Spanish) ok-TA-wee-a(Latin)
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
OCTOBER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture, English
Pronounced: Ahk-to-bər(Literature) awk-TO-ber(Popular Culture)
Derived from Latin octo , meaning eight. It was the name of the eighth month, and is now our tenth month. Ray Bradbury wrote a group of stories called "Octoberland." One of the characters is named October.
ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEHT
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet Swan Lake (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
ODIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Pronounced: O-din(English)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However, Odin is best known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
OFELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: o-FEH-lya
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.
OLIVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AHL-iv(English) AW-LEEV(French)
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

OLIVETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ahl-i-VEHT(English)
Feminine form of OLIVER. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) AW-LEE-VYA(French) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

ONYXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Onyxia is the name of a dragon in the MMORPG World of Warcraft. The name comes from the precious stone onyx and means "claw" or "nail".
OPAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-pəl
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Derived from Greek ὄφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
OPHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Jewish, German (Rare)
Other Scripts: אוֹפִירָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of OPHIR.
ORCHID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
A plant of the orchid family. From Latin orchis, from Ancient Greek orkhis, meaning “testicle”. Called such because of their testicle-shaped flowers of beautiful colours.
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὠρίων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
OSBORN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHZ-bawrn
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjǫrn used in England, and after the Norman Conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OWAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: O-wien(Welsh)
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though other theories connect it to Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
PAIGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYJ
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδίον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PALADIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
The name of two Tolkien characters.
PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PENDRAGON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: pen-DRAG-ən, PEN-drag-ən
The surname of Kings Arthur and Uther, meaning “head dragon” or “dragon’s head.” As first told by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Uther adopted the symbol of the dragon because of the comet with the dragon’s head that Merlin had seen in Wales, heralding the death of King Ambrosius Aurelius, Uther’s brother. In Welsh legend, it is also the surname of one “Gwen Pendragon,” who once kept Arthur prisoner.
In the Prose and Vulgate Merlins, the name Pendragon is given to the character elsewhere called Ambrosius Aurelianus: the son of Constantine and Ivoire, the uncle of Arthur, and the king of Britain between Vortigern and Uther, Pendragon’s brother. Pendragon allied with Merlin, defeated Vortigern and Hengist, died fighting the Saxons, and was buried at Stonehenge. Uther is said to have adopted his brother’s name as a surname in memory of the slain king.

Source: Christopher Bruce's Arthurian Name Dictionary

PEONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEE-ə-nee
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl(English)
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the Story of the Grail. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
PERDITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play The Winter's Tale (1610).
PETUNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: pə-TOON-yə
From the name of the flower, derived ultimately from a Tupi (South American) word.
PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοίβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοίβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοῖβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOENIX
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FEE-niks
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PIP-ə
Diminutive of PHILIPPA.
PISCES
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: PIE-seez
The name of the zodiacal constellation supposedly shaped like a pair of fish, derived from the plural form of Latin piscis meaning "fish". This is the name of the twelfth sign of the zodiac.
PLUTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Πλούτων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PLOO-to(English)
Latinized form of Greek Πλούτων (Plouton), derived from πλοῦτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.
POPPY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAHP-ee
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
PORTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearean character.
PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
PRIMULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-yuw-lə
From the name of a genus of several species of flowers, including the primrose. It is derived from the Latin word primulus meaning "very first".
PRISCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə(English) preesh-SHEEL-la(Italian)
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his 1858 poem The Courtship of Miles Standish [1].
PRUDENCE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: PROO-dəns(English) PRUY-DAHNS(French)
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
QUINN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KWIN(English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
RADAGAST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
One of the wizards in the books by J.R.R. Tolkien. His name may mean "tender of beasts" in Adûnaic.
RAEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RAY-gən
Variant of REAGAN.
RAFE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAYF
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAINE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAYN
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of RAIN (1) or a short form of LORRAINE.
RASTABAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Traditional name for Beta Draconis, the third brightest star in the DRACO constellation. The name comes from Arabic ra's ath-thu'ban, which means "head of the serpent".
RAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-vən
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
REAGAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern), Irish
Pronounced: RAY-gən(English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
REGULUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.
RENESMEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Various
Pronounced: rə-NEZ-may
Invented by American author Stephenie Meyer for her young adult vampire series 'The Twilight Saga', belonging to the daughter of Bella Swan and Edward Cullen, combining Bella's mother's name, RENEE, with Edward's foster-mother's name, ESME.
REUBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROO-bən(English)
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
RHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ῥέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: REH-A(Classical Greek) REE-ə(English)
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ῥέω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ἔρα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

RHOAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of ROAN.
RIVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROBYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English)
Feminine variant of ROBIN.
ROLAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French
Pronounced: RO-lənd(English) RAW-LAHN(French) RO-lant(German) RO-lahnt(Dutch) RO-lawnd(Hungarian) RAW-lant(Polish)
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic La Chanson de Roland, in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAWN-man(Polish) RO-man(Czech, German) RAW-man(Slovak) RO-mən(English)
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
ROSALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zə-lin, RAHZ-ə-lin
Variant of ROSALINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROWENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ro-EEN-ə
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. Alternatively, Geoffrey may have based it on a Welsh name. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819).
ROXANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: RAWK-SAN(French) rahk-SAN(English)
French and English form of ROXANA. This is the name of Cyrano's love interest in the play Cyrano de Bergerac (1897).
ROYAL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROI-əl
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: RIE-ən(English)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SABBATH
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Puritan, Rare), Literature
Pronounced: sah-BATH(English (Puritan)) SAH-bith(English (Puritan))
From the word "sabbath," referring to the day of rest (Saturday).
SABLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Diminutive of SARAH.
SAFFRON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
SAGE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SANSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Indian, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAHN-zə(Literature)
Sanskrit word meaning, "praise" or "charm." Used by American author George R.R. Martin for his epic fantasy book series 'A Song of Ice and Fire'. Lady Sansa Stark is the second child and elder daughter of EDDARD and CATELYN Stark. She serves as a POV character for twenty-four chapters throughout 'A Game of Thrones', 'A Clash of Kings', 'A Storm of Swords', and 'A Feast for Crows'. Initially betrothed to Crown Prince JOFFREY Baratheon, she is eventually married to his uncle TYRION Lannister. English actress Sophie Turner portrays her in the HBO television adaptation 'Game of Thrones'.
SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
SAPPHIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-ie-ər
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-RA(French) ZA-ra(German) SA-rah(Arabic)
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was consistently popular in the 20th century throughout the English-speaking world, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1970s and 80s.

Notable bearers include Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne, and the French actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923).

SATURN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: SAT-ərn(English)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SAWYER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SCOUT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SKOWT
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
SEASON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Either derived from the English word season, and thus ultimately from Latin satio "sowing; planting" (which later came to be understood as "time of planting"), or a transferred use of the surname SEASON. It has been occasionally used as a feminine given name from the 1800s onwards.
SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστός (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σελήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek) si-LEE-nee(English)
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, a Titan. She was sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SERENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
From the English word serene, which itself is derived from Latin serenus, which means "clear, calm, tranquil, quiet."
SERENITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-REHN-ə-tee
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".
SETH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת(Ancient Hebrew) Σήθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH(English)
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SEVERUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "stern" in Latin. This name was borne by several early saints.
SEYMOUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEE-mawr
From a Norman surname that originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SHAE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SHAY
Variant of SHEA.
SHYLOH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of SHILOH.
SIDNEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).
SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHN-ə
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
SIERRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHR-ə
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SIGMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: ZEEK-muwnt(German) SEEG-mund(Swedish) SIG-mənd(English)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
Pronounced: SEE-grid(Swedish) SEEG-reed(Finnish)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σίλας(Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs(English)
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel Silas Marner (1861).

SILVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SIOUX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOO
The name of a Native American people, used as a variant of SUE. Considered offensive amongst some Natives.
SIRIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: SIR-ee-əs(English)
The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σείριος (seirios) meaning "burning".
SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SKYLAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Variant of SKYLER.
SOLSTICE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: SAWL-stis
Derived from Latin solsticium and thus ultimately from sol "sun" and stito "to stand still". The English word solstice refers to two times of the year when the sun's apparent position in the sky reaches its northernmost or southernmost extremes.

Lionel Shriver (born Margaret Shriver), used Solstice for a character in her novel 'Big Brother' (2013).

SOPHIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SAW-FEE(French) SO-fee(English) zo-FEE(German) so-FEE(Dutch)
French form of SOPHIA.
SPARROW
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SPAR-o, SPEHR-o
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
STARR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR
Variant of STAR.
STELIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of STYLIANOS.
STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
STORM
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: STAWRM(English, Dutch)
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English or Old Dutch storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SYBELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: si-BEHL-ə
Variant of SIBYLLA.
SYBILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: zee-BI-lə(German) SEE-BEEL(French)
German and French form of SIBYL.
SYDNEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
From a surname that was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.
SYMPHONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIM-fə-nee
Simply from the English word, ultimately deriving from Greek σύμφωνος (symphonos) meaning "concordant in sound".
TALLULAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-LOO-lə
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.
TALON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAL-ən
From the English word meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".
TAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Lithuanian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Тамара(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Macedonian) თამარა(Georgian)
Pronounced: tu-MA-rə(Russian) TA-ma-ra(Czech, Slovak) tan-MA-ra(Polish) TAW-maw-raw(Hungarian) tə-MAR-ə(English) tə-MAHR-ə(English) TAM-ə-rə(English) ta-MA-ra(Spanish, Italian)
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TEAGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TEE-gən
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TEMPERANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
TEMPEST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHM-pist
From the English word meaning "storm". It appears in the title of William Shakespeare's play The Tempest (1611).
TERRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHR-ə
Variant of TARA (1), perhaps influenced by the Latin word terra meaning "land, earth".
TESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TEHS-ə(English)
Diminutive of THERESA.
THADDEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Θαδδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs(English) tha-DEE-əs(English)
From Θαδδαῖος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεόδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
THORNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THORN
Transferred use of the surname THORNE. Derived from the Old English word for "thorn." This was the name of a letter in the Old English alphabet, as well as the name of a character from the soap opera "The Bold and the Beautiful."
TIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: tee-AHR-ə
From the English word for a semicircle crown, ultimately of Greek origin.
TITAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hungarian
Pronounced: tit-an(Hungarian)
From the English word referring to "any of the giant gods in Greek mythology who preceded the Olympian gods". From the Ancient Greek titan (Τιτάν) of the same meaning.
TOPAZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τόπαζος (topazos).
TRISS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIS
Diminutive of BEATRICE.
TWILIGHT
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: TWIE-liet
From the English word referring to the time of day when the sun is just below the horizon. Ultimately from Old English twi- "half" + līht "light".

As a given name, it has been in rare use from the early 20th century onwards.

ULRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: UWL-rik
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf ruler". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
ULYSSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: yoo-LIS-ə
Feminine form of ULYSSES.
URSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: UR-sə-lə(English) UR-syoo-lə(English) UWR-zoo-la(German) OOR-soo-lah(Finnish)
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VALKYRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: VAL-ki-ree(English)
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.
VALOR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
From the English word valor meaning "bravery, courage". From the Latin valor "value".
VEGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
The name of a star in the constellation Lyra. Its name is from Arabic الواقع (al-Waqi') meaning "the swooping (eagle)".
VENUS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: WEH-noos(Latin) VEE-nəs(English)
Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love and sex. Her character was assimilated with that of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. As the mother of Aeneas she was considered an ancestor of the Roman people. The second planet from the sun is named after her.
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian, Belarusian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIRGIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: VUR-jil(English)
From the Roman family name Vergilius, which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the Aeneid. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
VIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: vee-VYA-na(Italian) bee-BYA-na(Spanish)
Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.
VIVIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEHN
French form of VIVIANA.
VIVIETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of VIVIENNE. William John Locke used this name for the title character in his novel Viviette (1910).
WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS-lee, WEHZ-lee
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WILLOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIL-o
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.
WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-ə-frid(English)
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
WOLFE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WUWLF
Variant of WOLF.
WOLFRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VAWL-fram
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
WOODROW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WUWD-ro
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. This name was popularized by American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
WYNNE (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIN
From an English surname that was derived from the given name WINE.
WYNONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: wi-NON-ə
Variant of WINONA.
XANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAN-dər(Dutch) KSAN-dər(Dutch) ZAN-dər(English)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003).
XAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər(English) ig-ZAY-vyər(English) GZA-VYEH(French) shu-vee-EHR(European Portuguese) sha-vee-EHR(Brazilian Portuguese) shə-bee-EH(Catalan)
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was born in a village by this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə(English)
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
YENIFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish variant of JENNIFER.
YSABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL
Medieval Spanish form of ISABEL.
YUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, Japanese
Pronounced: YUN-A(Japanese) YUUN-A(Japanese) YOU-NA(Japanese)
Yuna is a supporting character in the videogame Final Fantasy X as well as the main character of Final Fantasy X-2. She was the High Summoner who defeated Sin and brought the Eternal Calm. She was named for YUNALESCA, who was the first Summoner to defeat Sin according to the franchise mythology.
YVETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: EE-VEHT(French) ee-VEHT(English) i-VEHT(English)
French feminine form of YVES.
ZAHARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זָהֳרָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of ZOHAR.
ZEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ζεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDEWS(Classical Greek) ZOOS(English)
The name of a Greek god, related to the old Indo-European god *Dyeus, from a root meaning "sky" or "shine". In Greek mythology he was the highest of the gods. After he and his siblings defeated the Titans, Zeus ruled over the earth and humankind from atop Mount Olympus. He had control over the weather and his weapon was a thunderbolt.
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
ZION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: צִיוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIE-ən(English)
From the name of a citadel that was in the center of Jerusalem. Zion is also used to refer to a Jewish homeland and to heaven.
ZIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Berber
Pronounced: Zee-rah
Feminine of ZIRI.
ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Czech, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee(English) DZO-eh(Italian)
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century.

As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).

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