egyptianpanda's Personal Name List

Aemilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 70% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of Aemilius (see Emily).
Ainsley
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AYNZ-lee(English)
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
From a surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Alaric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
Alexander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

Alexandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξάνδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian) Ἀλεξάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) AW-lehk-sawn-draw(Hungarian) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Alexander. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
Alexandria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dree-ə
Rating: 63% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Alexander. Alexander the Great founded several cities by this name (or renamed them) as he extended his empire eastward. The most notable of these is Alexandria in Egypt, founded by Alexander in 331 BC.
Altair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
Amabilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Amabilis.
Ambrose
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀμβρόσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
Anju
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Pronounced: Ahn-joo
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
"Apricot", "Shine"
Annabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 62% based on 12 votes
Variant of Amabel influenced by the name Anna. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
Annabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
Variant of Annabel. It can also be taken as a combination of Anna and Belle.
Ariadne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀριάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 76% based on 12 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Greek prefix ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
Artemisia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρτεμισία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Artemisios. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
Asherah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of a Semitic mother goddess. She was worshipped by the Israelites before the advent of monotheism.
Athena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ἀθηνᾶ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

Athenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: a-THEE-nee-a, a-THEE-nya
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Elaboration of Athena.
Audrey
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AWD-ree(English) O-DREH(French)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Medieval diminutive of Æðelþryð. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
Aurelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Aurelius.
Autumn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
Ayala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיָּלָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ie-ah-LAH
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "doe, female deer" in Hebrew.
Brandon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-dən
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of Brendan.
Calla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
Carenza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variant of Kerensa, which has been 'used since the early 1970s, but more often in its variant form Karenza' (Dunkling, 1983). However, the name also occurs in medieval France; it belonged to a woman who composed the last two stanzas of an Occitan poem that begins Na Carenza al bel cors avinen, meaning "Lady Carenza of the lovely, gracious body".
Carmen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
Medieval Spanish form of Carmel influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
Charity
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHR-ə-tee, CHAR-ə-tee
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
Christabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-behl
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Combination of Christina and the name suffix bel. This name occurs in medieval literature, and was later used in 1800 by Samuel Coleridge in his poem Christabel [1].
Clara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
Claudia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Latin)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Claudius. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
Cleopatra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλεοπάτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: klee-o-PAT-rə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From the Greek name Κλεοπάτρα (Kleopatra) meaning "glory of the father", derived from κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory" combined with πατήρ (pater) meaning "father" (genitive πατρός). This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606) tells the story of her life.
Corinna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορίννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ko-RI-na(German) kə-REEN-ə(English) kə-RIN-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Κορίννα (Korinna), which was derived from κόρη (kore) meaning "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book Amores [1]. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem Corinna's going a-Maying [2].
Dagny
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: DAHNG-nuy(Swedish)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and nýr "new".
Dahlia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
Daniel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Finnish, Estonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) də-nee-EHL(Catalan) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

Daphne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δάφνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-PNEH(Classical Greek) DAF-nee(English) DAHF-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
Demetria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English
Other Scripts: Δημητρία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Demetrius.
Dreama
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminized form of Dream or variant of Drema
Eirene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Εἰρήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-REH-NEH(Classical Greek) ie-REE-nee(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Ancient Greek form of Irene.
Eleanor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienòr. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other Aenor" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

Elisabet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Spanish, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἐλισάβετ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: eh-LEE-sa-beht(Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) EH-lee-sah-beht(Finnish) eh-lee-sa-BEHT(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Scandinavian and Finnish form of Elizabeth. It is also used in Spain alongside the traditional form Isabel.
Elle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHL
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
Diminutive of Eleanor and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
Ellery
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-ree
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the medieval masculine name Hilary.
Elly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHL-ee(English) EH-lee(Dutch)
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Dutch diminutive of Elisabeth or an English variant of Ellie.
Élodie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LAW-DEE
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
French form of Alodia.
Eloise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-o-eez, ehl-o-EEZ
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which was probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne by the 12th-century French scholar and philosopher Héloïse. Secretly marrying the theologian Peter Abelard at a young age, she became a nun (and eventually an abbess) after Abelard was violently castrated by order of her uncle Fulbert.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

Emilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) ehn-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 79% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Aemilius (see Emily).
Eponine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: EHP-ə-neen(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel Les Misérables (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.
Esmeralda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
Essie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHS-ee
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Estelle or Esther.
Felicity
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: fə-LIS-i-tee
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name Felicitas. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series Felicity.
Felix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Latin)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

Garrett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-it, GEHR-it
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Gerald or Gerard. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
Gwyneira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: gwi-NAY-ra
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow".
Gyða
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1], Icelandic
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Gytha.
Holly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-ee
Rating: 60% based on 11 votes
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
Ilana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אִילָנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Ilan.
Illyria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Various (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ίλλυρία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Illyrios.
Ivy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
Rating: 78% based on 12 votes
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
Jane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 85% based on 4 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see John). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

Jasper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Jeremy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JEHR-ə-mee(English) JEHR-mee(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
English form of Jeremiah, originally a medieval vernacular form. This is the spelling used in some English versions of the New Testament.
Jesenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Yesenia.
Jessamine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHS-ə-min
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see Jasmine), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
John
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN(American English) JAWN(British English, Dutch) YAWN(Swedish, Norwegian)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰωάννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "Yahweh is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular, typically being the most common male name from the 13th to the 20th century (but sometimes outpaced by William). During the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys. In the United States it was the most common name for boys until 1923.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

The forms Ian (Scottish), Sean (Irish) and Evan (Welsh) have also been frequently used in the English-speaking world, as has the medieval diminutive Jack.

Jonathan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English) ZHAW-NA-TAHN(French) YO-na-tan(German)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "Yahweh has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote Gulliver's Travels and other works.

Judas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἰούδας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: JOO-dəs(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Ἰούδας (Ioudas), the Greek form of Judah. This is the name of several characters in the New Testament including the infamous Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus to the Jewish authorities in exchange for money.
Julia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия(Russian) Юлія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə(English) YOO-lya(German, Danish, Polish) YOO-lee-ah(Swedish, Finnish) KHOO-lya(Spanish) YOO-lyi-yə(Russian) YOO-lee-a(Latin)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Julius. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

Julian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from Julius. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
Juliet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 86% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of Juliette or Giulietta. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Julissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic), Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: joo-LIS-ə(Hispanic American, Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Elaboration of Julia by way of adding the name suffix -issa.
Julius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German, Finnish, Lithuanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech
Pronounced: YOO-lee-oos(Latin) JOO-lee-əs(English) YOO-lyuws(German) YOO-leews(Finnish) YUW-lyuws(Lithuanian) YOO-lyoos(Danish) YOO-lee-uys(Swedish) YOO-li-yuws(Czech)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Greek ἴουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god Jupiter. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

Kaho
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 花歩(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KA-HO
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Japanese name made up of the characters for "flower" and "walk," or other combinations of kanji with the same readings.
Keziah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
Ksenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Ксения(Russian) Ксенія(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: KSEH-nya(Polish) KSYEH-nyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Polish form of Xenia, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Ксения or Ukrainian/Belarusian Ксенія (see Kseniya).
Kynthia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κυνθία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Greek form of Cynthia.
Laoise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-shə
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Possibly a newer form of Luigsech. It is also used as an Irish form of Louise.
Leandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dra(Spanish)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Leander.
Leia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Portuguese, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-ə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 10 votes
Form of Leah used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as a Portuguese form. This is the name of a princess in the Star Wars movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.
Liesel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEE-zəl
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
German diminutive of Elisabeth.
Lila 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लीला(Hindi)
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.
Lilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LEE-lya(Spanish) LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
Spanish and Italian form of Lily, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see Liliya).
Lily
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 66% based on 11 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
Lorelei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.
Lorraine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-RAYN
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of Lothar". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.
Lucy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-see
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
English form of Lucia, in use since the Middle Ages.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lydia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδία(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king Lydos. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
Lyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
Lysander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύσανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λύσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.
Lysandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λυσάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Lysandros (see Lysander).
Magdalene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μαγδαληνή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: mak-da-LEH-nə(German) MAG-də-lin(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From a title meaning "of Magdala". Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament, was named thus because she was from Magdala - a village on the Sea of Galilee whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. She was cleaned of evil spirits by Jesus and then remained with him during his ministry, witnessing the crucifixion and the resurrection. She was a popular saint in the Middle Ages, and the name became common then. In England it is traditionally rendered Madeline, while Magdalene or Magdalen is the learned form.
Margaux
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Rating: 19% based on 11 votes
Variant of Margot influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
Margery
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Medieval English form of Margaret.
Mariam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Georgian, Armenian, Malay, Arabic
Other Scripts: Μαριάμ(Ancient Greek) მარიამ(Georgian) Մարիամ(Armenian) مريم(Arabic)
Pronounced: mahr-YAHM(Armenian) MAR-yam(Arabic)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Form of Maria used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as the Georgian, Armenian and Malay form. It is also an alternate transcription of Arabic مريم (see Maryam).
Mariamne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From Μαριάμη (Mariame), the form of Maria used by the historian Josephus when referring to the wife of King Herod.
Marisol
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-ree-SOL
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
Combination of María and Sol 1 or Soledad. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".
Maya 3
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַיָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Derived from Hebrew מַיִם (mayim) meaning "water".
Maybelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Variant of Mabel.
Mei 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 美, 梅, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: MAY
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From Chinese (měi) meaning "beautiful" or (méi) meaning "Chinese plum" (species Prunus mume), as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Miyako
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 美夜子, etc.(Japanese Kanji) みやこ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MEE-YA-KO
Rating: 27% based on 11 votes
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (ya) meaning "night" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
Murasaki
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese (Rare)
Other Scripts: (Japanese Kanji) むらさき(Japanese Hiragana) ムラサキ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: MOO-RA-SA-KYEE
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
This name is used as 紫 (shi, murasaki), originally (and still is) referring to the type of plant known as lithospermum erythrorhizon, but developed to refer to a purple or violet colour, since the dye produced from the plant has that type of colour.
The word is derived from a combination of 叢/群 (mura) meaning "group, cluster" and 咲 (saki) meaning "bloom," from the multiple flowers of the plant.

One bearer of this name was Heian period (794–1185) novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at the Imperial court Murasaki Shikibu (紫 式部) (c. 973-8 - 1014-31), best known as the author of The Tale of Genji.

This name is rarely given to girls, if given at all.

Nagiko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 凪子, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: NAH-GEE-KO
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
From Japanese 凪 (nagi) meaning "calm" combined with 子 (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Naima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic (Maghrebi), Bengali, Uzbek, Maranao, Maguindanao, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: نعيمة(Arabic) নাইমা(Bengali) Наима(Uzbek Cyrillic)
Pronounced: na-‘EE-mah(Arabic)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Alternate transcription of Na'ima primarily used in Northern Africa as well as the Bengali, Uzbek, Maranao, and Maguindanao form of the name.

In the case of Naima Mora, she was named after a composition by John Coltrane. The composition is named after Coltrane's wife Juanita Naima Grubbs who has adopted the Arabic name.

Nate
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAYT
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Short form of Nathan or Nathaniel.
Nathan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: נָתָן(Hebrew) Ναθάν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NAY-thən(English) NA-TAHN(French)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.

It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Nathan Hale (1755-1776), an American spy executed by the British during the American Revolution.

Nefertari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TAHR-ee(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
Nerissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: nə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρηΐς (nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: நீலா(Tamil) नीला(Hindi)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
Nina 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Lithuanian, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Нина(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian) Ніна(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: NYEE-nə(Russian) NEE-na(Italian, German, Slovak) NEE-nə(English) NEE-NA(French) NEE-nah(Finnish) nyi-NU(Lithuanian) NYEE-na(Polish) NI-na(Czech)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Short form of names that end in nina, such as Antonina or Giannina. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
Noella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Feminine variant form of Noël.
Penelope
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEH-NEH-LO-PEH(Classical Greek) pə-NEHL-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Probably derived from Greek πηνέλοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πήνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
Persephone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
Raizel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Pronounced: RAY-zil, RIE-zil
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Variant of Raisel.
Reina 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: ריינאַ(Yiddish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Derived from Yiddish ריין (rein) meaning "clean, pure".
Rhiannon
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

Rosalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: ro-za-LEE-a(Italian)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.
Rose
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 70% based on 10 votes
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Rosemary
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Combination of Rose and Mary. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
Rosetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEHT-ta
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
Italian diminutive of Rosa 1.
Rosie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zee
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Rose.
Roxana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ῥωξάνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Ῥωξάνη (Rhoxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
Roxelana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From a Turkish nickname meaning "Ruthenian". This referred to the region of Ruthenia, covering Belarus, Ukraine and western Russia. Roxelana (1502-1558), also known by the name Hürrem, was a slave and then concubine of Süleyman the Magnificent, sultan of the Ottoman Empire. She eventually became his wife and produced his heir, Selim II.
Sadako
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 定子, 貞子, 禎子, 節子(Japanese Kanji) さだこ(Japanese Hiragana) サダコ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: SA-DA-KO
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From Japanese 貞 (sada) meaning "chaste", 節 (sada) meaning "season", 定 (sada) meaning "determined" or 禎 (sada) meaning "blessed, good fortune" combined with Japanese 子 (ko) meaning "child." 貞子 "chaste child" was by far the most common combination.

A famous bearer of the name was Sadako Sasaki (佐々木 禎子) (1943-1955), a child who died from leukemia after the Hiroshima bomb. Her endeavour to fold 1000 paper cranes in order to have her wish granted has become a symbol of peace.

Saira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: سائرہ(Urdu)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "traveller" in Arabic.
Sansa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAHN-sə(Literature)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was invented by author George R. R. Martin for Sansa Stark, a main character in his "Game of Thrones" book series, first released in 1996. The books were adapted as a TV series in 2011.

George R. R. Martin might have based it on Sancha or Sancia which were both common names among royalty during the Middle Ages, given that many of his character's names are variants of common medieval names.

Contrary to popular belief Sansa is not a Sanskrit name.

Saoirse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
Saskia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a:(Dutch) ZAS-kya(German)
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
From the Germanic element sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife". Saskia van Uylenburgh (1612-1642) was the wife of the Dutch painter Rembrandt.
Satu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SAH-too
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "fairy tale, fable" in Finnish.
Sayaka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 沙也香, 沙耶香, 沙也加, 紗耶香, etc.(Japanese Kanji) さやか(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SA-YA-KA
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (sa) meaning "sand" or (sa) meaning "thread, silk" with (ya) meaning "also" or (ya), an interjection, combined with (ka) meaning "fragrance" or (ka) meaning "increase". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Sayo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 紗世, 咲代, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SAH-YO
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Japanese 小 (sa) meaning "small" or 咲 (sa) meaning "bloom" combined with 世 (yo) meaning "world" or 代 (yo) meaning "generation". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Scarlet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Either a variant of Scarlett or else from the English word for the red colour (both of the same origin, a type of cloth).
Selja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Norwegian, Icelandic
Pronounced: SEH-lyah
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Celia. It also means "elder (plant)" in Finnish.
Sender
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: סענדער(Yiddish) סנדר(Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Yiddish form of Alexander.
Solveig
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Pronounced: SOOL-vie(Norwegian) SOOL-vay(Swedish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From an Old Norse name, which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt (1876).
Sophie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SAW-FEE(French) SO-fee(English) zo-FEE(German) so-FEE(Dutch)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
French form of Sophia.
Soraya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Spanish, French, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: ثریا(Persian)
Pronounced: so-ray-YAW(Persian) so-RA-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Persian form of Thurayya. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya (1932-2001), wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.
Theodoric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: thee-AHD-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
Theophilus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Θεόφιλος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: thee-AHF-i-ləs(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεόφιλος (Theophilos) meaning "friend of god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and φίλος (philos) meaning "friend". In the New Testament the evangelist Luke addresses his gospel and the Book of Acts to a man named Theophilus.
Valencia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ba-LEHN-sya(Latin American Spanish) ba-LEHN-thya(European Spanish) və-LEHN-see-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".
Valeria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: va-LEH-rya(Italian) ba-LEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Valerius. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
Venetia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Greek
Other Scripts: Βενετία(Greek)
Rating: 29% based on 11 votes
Originally this was probably a Latinized form of Gwynedd or Gwyneth. It also coincides with the Latin name of the city of Venice in Italy. This name was borne by the celebrated beauty Venetia Stanley (1600-1633). Benjamin Disraeli used it in his novel entitled Venetia (1837).

As a Greek name it is derived directly from the name of the city.

Vercingetorix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Gaulish
Pronounced: wehr-king-GEH-taw-riks(Latin) vər-sin-JEHT-ə-riks(English)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "king over warriors" from Gaulish ver "on, over" combined with cingeto "marching men, warriors" and rix "king". This name was borne by a chieftain of the Gaulish tribe the Arverni. He led the resistance against Julius Caesar's attempts to conquer Gaul, but he was eventually defeated, brought to Rome, and executed.
Victoria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə(English) beek-TO-rya(Spanish) vik-TO-rya(German)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of Victorius. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.

Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

Viola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-o-la(Czech) VEE-aw-la(Slovak)
Rating: 41% based on 11 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
Violet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
Wisteria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIS-tee- ree-a
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Derived from the name of the flower, which in turn was named after the American anatomist Caspar Wistar. His last name allegedly derives from German Westländer "westerner".
Zora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ZO-ra(Czech) ZAW-ra(Slovak)
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
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