Sophannagh's Personal Name List

Adonai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 16 votes
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
Adonis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄδωνις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-DAW-NEES(Classical Greek) ə-DAHN-is(English) ə-DO-nis(English)
Rating: 42% based on 14 votes
From Phoenician adon meaning "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see Dumuzi).
Aella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄελλα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-EHL-LA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.
Agatha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀγαθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-ə-thə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 31 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
Agathangelos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀγαθάγγελος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 43% based on 14 votes
Means "bearer of good news", derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good" and ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger, angel". Saint Agathangelus of Rome was a 4th-century deacon who was martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian.
Ailsa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 49% based on 26 votes
From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.
Alby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Alcyone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλκυόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-SIE-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 52% based on 27 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἀλκυόνη (Alkyone), derived from the word ἀλκυών (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
Alfreda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Polish (Rare), German (Rare)
Pronounced: al-FREE-də(English) al-FREH-da(Italian, Polish, German)
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of Alfred.
Alodia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Possibly from a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements alja "other, foreign" and aud "riches, wealth" [1]. Saint Alodia was a 9th-century Spanish martyr with her sister Nunilo.
Amordad
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: امرداد(Persian)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Modern Persian form of Ameretat.
Andrew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo(English)
Rating: 71% based on 8 votes
English form of the Greek name Ἀνδρέας (Andreas), which was derived from ἀνδρεῖος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

Andy
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-dee
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of Andrew or sometimes Andrea 2. American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
Anne 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN(French, English) A-neh(Swedish) A-nə(Danish, German) AHN-neh(Finnish) AH-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 82% based on 23 votes
French form of Anna. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.

The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in Anne of Green Gables (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

Anneliese
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: A-nə-lee-zə(German) ah-nə-LEE-sə(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 29 votes
Combination of Anna and Liese.
Apphia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἀπφία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AF-ee-ə(English) AP-fee-ə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Greek form of a Hebrew name that possibly meant "increasing". This is a name mentioned in Paul's epistle to Philemon in the New Testament.
Ariella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ar-ee-EHL-ə, ehr-ee-EHL-ə
Rating: 60% based on 25 votes
Strictly feminine form of Ariel.
Aristomache
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀριστομάχη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 46% based on 25 votes
Derived from the Greek elements ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "best" and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle".
Armand
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AR-MAHN
Rating: 52% based on 24 votes
French form of Herman.
Assumpta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Latinate form of Asunción, used especially in Ireland [1].
Auberon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-bər-ahn
Rating: 53% based on 23 votes
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably Alberich.
Beatrice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish, Romanian
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
Italian form of Beatrix. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
Beauregard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-rə-gahrd
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
Bee
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEE
Rating: 39% based on 22 votes
Short form of Beatrix and other names beginning with B.
Bella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHL-ə
Rating: 45% based on 22 votes
Short form of Isabella and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".
Benigna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-NEEGH-na(Spanish) beh-NEEN-nya(Italian)
Rating: 40% based on 21 votes
Feminine form of Benigno.
Betty
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHT-ee
Rating: 44% based on 21 votes
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Beulah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: בְּעוּלָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BYOO-lə(English)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
Biddy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BID-ee(English)
Rating: 38% based on 22 votes
Diminutive of Bridget.
Birgitte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Danish form of Birgitta.
Blossom
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAH-səm
Rating: 44% based on 23 votes
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
Borya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Боря(Russian)
Rating: 28% based on 21 votes
Diminutive of Boris.
Brynmor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Buddy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUD-ee
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
Camellia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-i-ə, kə-MEHL-i-ə
Rating: 47% based on 20 votes
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
Camilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Camillus. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
Carla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: KAR-la(Italian, Spanish, German) KAHR-lə(English) KAHR-lah(Dutch)
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of Carlo, Carlos or Carl.
Cassiopeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιόπεια, Κασσιέπεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kas-ee-ə-PEE-ə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 20 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιόπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιέπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
Cecilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 58% based on 9 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

Chance
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHANS
Rating: 21% based on 8 votes
Originally a diminutive of Chauncey. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
Charlotte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Rating: 76% based on 8 votes
French feminine diminutive of Charles. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

Claire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Rating: 74% based on 23 votes
French form of Clara.
Clement
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHM-ənt
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
Concepta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Latinate form of Concepción.
Cordula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Late Latin name meaning "heart" from Latin cor (genitive cordis). Saint Cordula was one of the 4th-century companions of Saint Ursula.
Cosmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 50% based on 20 votes
Italian variant of Cosimo. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
Cronus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κρόνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KRO-nəs(English)
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Κρόνος (Kronos), possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ker- meaning "to cut". Cronus was the Titan who fathered the Greek gods. As his wife Rhea gave birth to the gods, Cronus swallowed them fearing the prophecy that he would be overthrown by one of his children. However Rhea hid Zeus, her last child, who eventually forced his father to disgorge his siblings. Cronus and the rest of the Titans were then defeated by the gods and exiled.
Cyrano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SIR-ə-no(English)
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient Greek city of Cyrene, which was located in North Africa. Edmond Rostand used this name in his play Cyrano de Bergerac (1897). He based his character upon a real person, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, a French satirist of the 17th century.
Dacre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAY-kər
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name in Cumbria, of Brythonic origin meaning "trickling stream".
Dahlia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 62% based on 20 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
Demetrius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δημήτριος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 54% based on 21 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημήτριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Demeter 1. Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.
Deusdedit
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latin name meaning "God has given". This was the name of two popes (who are also known by the related name Adeodatus).
Diana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian) Діана(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) dyee-AH-nu(Ukrainian) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Latin)
Rating: 65% based on 20 votes
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see Zeus). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

Dick 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIK
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Medieval diminutive of Richard. The change in the initial consonant is said to have been caused by the way the trilled Norman R was pronounced by the English [1].
Dieudonné
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DYUU-DAW-NEH
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Means "given by God" in French, used as a French form of Deusdedit. It is currently much more common in French-speaking Africa than it is in France.
Dieudonnée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: DYUU-DAW-NEH
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Dieudonné.
Dionisia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: dyo-NEE-sya(Spanish)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Dionysius.
Dolly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHL-ee
Rating: 59% based on 21 votes
Diminutive of Dorothy. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them. In modern times this name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of Dolores.
Dory
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ee
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Diminutive of Dorothy or Doris. This is the name of a fish in the animated film Finding Nemo (2003).
Dragana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Драгана(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 41% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Dragan.
Drew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DROO
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Short form of Andrew.
Dulcibella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 50% based on 18 votes
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
Earnestine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-nis-teen
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variant of Ernestine.
Eartha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-thə
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Combination of the English word earth with the feminine name suffix a. It has been used in honour of African-American philanthropist Eartha M. M. White (1876-1974). Another famous bearer was American singer and actress Eartha Kitt (1927-2008).
Edgar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, German
Pronounced: EHD-gər(English) EHD-GAR(French)
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton [1]. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
Edna 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: EHD-nə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Eglantine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHG-lən-tien, EHG-lən-teen
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It is derived via Old French from Vulgar Latin *aquilentum meaning "prickly". It was early used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story The Prioress's Tale.
Elaine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-LAYN(English) ee-LAYN(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From an Old French form of Helen. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation Le Morte d'Arthur Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic Idylls of the King (1859).
Elisha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִישַׁע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-shə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". According to the Old Testament, Elisha was a prophet and miracle worker. He was the attendant of Elijah and succeeded him after his ascension to heaven.
Eliza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Romanian, Hungarian, Georgian
Other Scripts: ელიზა(Georgian)
Pronounced: i-LIE-zə(English) eh-LYEE-za(Polish) EH-lee-zaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 76% based on 21 votes
Short form of Elizabeth. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation My Fair Lady (1956).
Ellery
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-ree
Rating: 49% based on 19 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the medieval masculine name Hilary.
Emil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
Other Scripts: Емил(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Эмиль(Russian)
Pronounced: EH-mil(Swedish, Czech) EH-meel(German, Slovak, Hungarian) eh-MEEL(Romanian) EHN-myeel(Polish) eh-MYEEL(Russian) ə-MEEL(English) EHM-il(English)
Rating: 60% based on 7 votes
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
Emilie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyə(German) eh-MEE-lee-eh(Norwegian) EHM-i-lee(Swedish)
Rating: 60% based on 19 votes
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see Emily).
Emma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish) EHM-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's 1709 poem Henry and Emma [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

Erato
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἐρατώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-RA-TAW(Classical Greek) EHR-ə-to(English)
Rating: 40% based on 19 votes
Means "lovely" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of lyric poetry.
Erminhilt
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Old Germanic form of Irmhild.
Ernestine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: EHR-NEHS-TEEN(French) ehr-nehs-TEE-nə(German) UR-nis-teen(English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Ernest.
Esperanza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-peh-RAN-tha(European Spanish) ehs-peh-RAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
Euphemia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
Euphrosyne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐφροσύνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FRAH-si-nee(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "mirth, merriment" in Greek. She was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
Eveline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: EHV-ə-leen(English) EHV-ə-lien(English) EHV-LEEN(French) eh-və-LEE-nə(Dutch) eh-və-LEEN(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 18 votes
Variant of Evelina.
Fidelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Fidel.
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 61% based on 20 votes
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Fletcher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLECH-ər
Rating: 52% based on 18 votes
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
Florian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-RYAHN(French) FLAW-ryan(Polish)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of Florus. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
Fortune
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAWR-TUYN(French) FAWR-chən(English)
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Simply from the word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
Franklyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRANGK-lin
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Variant of Franklin.
Frey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: FRAY(English)
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Variant of Freyr.
Frideswide
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Modern form of the Old English name Friðuswiþ, formed of the elements friþ "peace" and swiþ "strong". Saint Frideswide was an 8th-century English princess who became a nun. She is credited with establishing Christ Church in Oxford.
Gaston
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: GAS-TAWN
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element gast meaning "stranger, guest". This is the usual French name for Saint Vedastus, called Vaast in Flemish, and alternatively the name may be connected to it. The name was also borne by several counts of Foix-Béarn, beginning in the 13th century.
Gawain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: gə-WAYN(English) GAH-win(English)
Rating: 46% based on 17 votes
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He can be identified with the earlier Welsh hero Gwalchmei, and it is likely that the name derives from Gwalchmei. Alternatively it may have a different Celtic or even a Germanic origin. Gawain was a popular hero in medieval stories such as the 14th-century romantic poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Gemma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 17 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
Ginevra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEH-vra
Rating: 57% based on 10 votes
Italian form of Guinevere. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
Greer
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRIR(English)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Gregor.
Griffith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GRIF-ith
Rating: 49% based on 16 votes
Anglicized form of Gruffudd.
Gudrun
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: GOO-droon(German)
Rating: 28% based on 15 votes
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
Gwenaëlle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWEH-NA-EHL(French)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Gwenaël.
Hadas
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַס(Hebrew)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Means "myrtle tree" in Hebrew.
Hamlet
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Armenian
Other Scripts: Համլետ(Armenian)
Pronounced: HAM-lət(English) hahm-LEHT(Armenian)
Personal remark: MN only
Rating: 59% based on 18 votes
Anglicized form of the Danish name Amleth. Shakespeare used this name for the Prince of Denmark in his play Hamlet (1600), which he based upon earlier Danish tales.
Hans
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: HANS(German) HAHNS(Dutch)
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
German short form of Johannes, now used independently. This name has been very common in German-speaking areas of Europe since the late Middle Ages. From an early period it was transmitted to the Low Countries and Scandinavia. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a German portrait painter, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
Harland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lənd
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Harlan.
Heath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEETH
Rating: 51% based on 17 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley [1].
Hélène
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LEHN
Rating: 59% based on 18 votes
French form of Helen.
Helene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: heh-LEHN(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) heh-LEH-nə(German) HEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 61% based on 19 votes
Ancient Greek form of Helen, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
Hermia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: HUR-mee-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of Hermes. Shakespeare used this name in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
Holden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HOL-dən
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951), Holden Caufield.
Honorata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Polish
Pronounced: khaw-naw-RA-ta(Polish)
Rating: 47% based on 18 votes
Feminine form of Honoratus.
Howard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOW-ərd
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
From an English surname that can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name Hughard; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name Hávarðr; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
Idonea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of Iðunn. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century [1].
Idony
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
Medieval English vernacular form of Idonea.
Idril
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Means "sparkle brilliance" in the fictional language Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
Idris 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".
Igraine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, from Igerna, the Latinized form of Welsh Eigyr. In Arthurian legend she is the mother of King Arthur by Uther Pendragon and the mother of Morgan le Fay by Gorlois. The Welsh form Eigyr or Eigr was rendered into Latin as Igerna by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth.
Immaculata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Latin form of Inmaculada.
Impi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EEM-pee
Rating: 25% based on 13 votes
Means "maiden, virgin" in Finnish.
India
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
Rating: 46% based on 17 votes
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
Innocent
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Pronounced: IN-ə-sənt(English)
Rating: 38% based on 18 votes
From the Late Latin name Innocentius, which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.
Isaura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ee-SOW-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 18 votes
Late Latin name meaning "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.
Jane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 85% based on 22 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see John). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

Jemma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: JEHM-ə
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
Variant of Gemma.
Jenny
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-ee(English) YEH-nuy(Swedish) YEH-nee(German)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Originally a medieval English diminutive of Jane. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of Jennifer.
Jezebel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אִיזֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHZ-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 44% based on 17 votes
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel), which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.
Juliet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Juliette or Giulietta. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Kerensa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Means "love" in Cornish.
Keziah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 16 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
Kim 1
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIM
Rating: 25% based on 17 votes
At the present it is usually considered a short form of Kimberly, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel Kim (1901), though in this case it was short for Kimball. In her novel Show Boat (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
Kimberley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIM-bər-lee
Rating: 35% based on 17 votes
Variant of Kimberly.
Kit
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIT
Rating: 40% based on 19 votes
Diminutive of Christopher or Katherine. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
Klaus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
Pronounced: KLOWS(German, Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 12 votes
German short form of Nicholas.
Ladonna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: lə-DAHN-ə(English)
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name Donna.
Laima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Latvian, Baltic Mythology
Rating: 26% based on 9 votes
From Latvian laime and Lithuanian laima, which mean "luck, fate". This was the name of the Latvian and Lithuanian goddess of fate, luck, pregnancy and childbirth. She was the sister of the goddesses Dēkla and Kārta, who were also associated with fate.
Laurena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Elaboration of Lauren.
Laverna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown. Laverna was the Roman goddess of thieves and thievery.
Lestat
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: lə-STAT(English)
Rating: 33% based on 18 votes
Name used by author Anne Rice for a character in her Vampire Chronicles series of novels, first released in 1976, where it belongs to the French vampire Lestat de Lioncourt. Rice possibly intended the name to appear derived from Old French or Occitan l'estat "state, status", though apparently her husband's name Stan was inspiration.
Liam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Pronounced: LEE-əm(English) LYAM(French)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Irish short form of William. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017.
Ligeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λιγεία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Derived from Greek λιγύς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story Ligeia (1838).
Lilith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Linda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də(English) LIN-da(German, Dutch, Czech) LEEN-da(Italian) LEEN-DA(French) LEEN-dah(Finnish) LEEN-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
Lisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Pronounced: LEE-sə(English) LEE-za(German, Italian) LEE-sah(Dutch)
Rating: 30% based on 19 votes
Short form of Elizabeth and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.

In the United States this form was more popular than the full form Elizabeth from 1958 to 1978, and was in fact the top ranked American name between 1962 and 1969.

Loki
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: LO-kee(English)
Rating: 43% based on 19 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from the Germanic root *luka meaning "knot, lock". In Norse mythology Loki was a trickster god associated with magic and shape shifting. Loki's children include the wolf Fenrir, the sea serpent Jörmungandr, and the queen of the dead Hel. After he orchestrated the death of Balder, the other gods tied him to a rock below a snake that dripped venom onto his face. It is told that he will break free during Ragnarök, the final battle, and slay and be slain by Heimdall.
Lolita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: lo-LEE-ta
Rating: 39% based on 16 votes
Diminutive of Lola.
Louis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE(French) LOO-is(English) LOO-ee(English) loo-EE(Dutch)
Rating: 56% based on 16 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Ludwig. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote Treasure Island and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

Lucan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 50% based on 16 votes
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
Lyosha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Лёша(Russian)
Rating: 29% based on 16 votes
Diminutive of Aleksey.
Lyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Personal remark: MN only
Rating: 62% based on 20 votes
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
Lyric
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Rating: 48% based on 18 votes
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικός (lyrikos).
Lysander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύσανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 66% based on 20 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λύσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.
Lysandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λυσάνδρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 62% based on 20 votes
Feminine form of Lysandros (see Lysander).
Lysistrata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λυσιστράτη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 48% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of Lysistrate.
Maeve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV(Irish)
Rating: 51% based on 19 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Magalie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-GA-LEE
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Variant of Magali.
Marigold
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
Personal remark: on a male (MN) or a female
Rating: 52% based on 17 votes
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of Mary and the English word gold.
Marilyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Combination of Mary and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
Mavourneen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Irish phrase mo mhúirnín meaning "my darling".
Megan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən(English)
Rating: 39% based on 16 votes
Welsh diminutive of Margaret. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
Mehetabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְהֵיטַבְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mi-HEHT-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name מְהֵיטַבְאֵל (Meheitav'el) meaning "God makes happy". This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
Melanie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-nee(English) MEH-la-nee(German) meh-la-NEE(German)
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μέλαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

Metrodora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Μητροδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek μήτηρ (meter) meaning "mother" (genitive μητρός) and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr who was killed with her sisters Menodora and Nymphodora.
Michelangelo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-keh-LAN-jeh-lo(Italian) mie-kə-LAN-jə-lo(English)
Rating: 52% based on 18 votes
Combination of Michael and Angelo, referring to the archangel Michael. The Renaissance painter and sculptor Michelangelo Buonarroti, from Florence, was the man who created such great works of art as the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This name was also borne by the Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi, better known as Caravaggio.
Miervaldis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Latvian
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latvian name derived from the Baltic elements mier "peace" and vald "rule".
Minerva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English)
Rating: 67% based on 20 votes
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
Modesty
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAHD-ə-stee
Personal remark: MN only
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
Moira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MOI-rə(English)
Rating: 49% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Máire. It also coincides with Greek Μοῖρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοῖραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
Molly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 60% based on 18 votes
Medieval diminutive of Mary, now often used independently. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1922), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
Montgomery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mənt-GUM-ə-ree, mənt-GUM-ree
Rating: 54% based on 16 votes
From an English surname meaning "Gumarich's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
Montserrat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: moon-sə-RAT
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".
Morgane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAWR-GAN
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
French, either a form of Morgan 2 or a feminine form of Morgan 1.
Nancy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAN-see
Rating: 55% based on 18 votes
Previously a medieval diminutive of Annis, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of Ann. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
Napoleon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, English
Pronounced: nə-PO-lee-ən(English)
Rating: 43% based on 18 votes
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. The etymology is uncertain, but it is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen meaning "sons of mist", a name used in Germanic mythology to refer to the keepers of a hoard of treasure (often identified with the Burgundians). Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
Narcissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: nahr-SIS-ə(English)
Rating: 49% based on 19 votes
Feminine form of Narcissus.
Nell
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEHL
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as Eleanor, Ellen 1 or Helen. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
Nephthys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Νέφθυς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Greek form of Egyptian nbt-ḥwt (reconstructed as Nebet-Hut) meaning "lady of the house", derived from nbt "lady" and ḥwt "house". This was the name of an Egyptian goddess associated with the air, death and mourning. She was wife of the desert god Seth.
Nero 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: NIR-o(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigorous". It was borne most infamously by a tyrannical Roman emperor of the 1st century.
Nesta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Welsh diminutive of Agnes.
Nicholas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Rating: 67% based on 14 votes
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

Nico
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Italian, Dutch, Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 10 votes
Short form of Nicholas (or sometimes Nicodemus).
Nicodemus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Νικόδημος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: nik-ə-DEE-məs(English) nee-ko-DEH-moos(Latin)
Rating: 62% based on 17 votes
From the Greek name Νικόδημος (Nikodemos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.
Nicolas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NEE-KAW-LA
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
French form of Nicholas.
Niklaus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Swiss)
Rating: 46% based on 10 votes
Swiss German form of Nicholas.
Niko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Croatian, Slovene, Georgian, German
Other Scripts: ნიკო(Georgian)
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Finnish)
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
Finnish form of Nicholas, as well as a Croatian, Slovene, Georgian and German short form.
Nikolai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Rating: 62% based on 11 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see Nikolay).
Nina 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Lithuanian, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Нина(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian) Ніна(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: NYEE-nə(Russian) NEE-na(Italian, German, Slovak) NEE-nə(English) NEE-NA(French) NEE-nah(Finnish) nyi-NU(Lithuanian) NYEE-na(Polish) NI-na(Czech)
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
Short form of names that end in nina, such as Antonina or Giannina. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
Niobe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νιόβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEE-O-BEH(Classical Greek) NIE-o-bee(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Niobe was the daughter of Tantalos, a king of Asia Minor. Because she boasted that she was superior to Leto, Leto's children Apollo and Artemis killed her 14 children with poison arrows. In grief, Niobe was turned to stone by Zeus.
Octavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ə(English) ok-TA-bya(Spanish) ok-TA-wee-a(Latin)
Rating: 70% based on 21 votes
Feminine form of Octavius. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
Octavian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Romanian
Pronounced: ahk-TAY-vee-ən(English)
Rating: 62% based on 18 votes
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name Octavius. After Gaius Octavius (later the Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.
Odell
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: o-DEHL
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was originally from an English place name, itself derived from Old English wad "woad" (a plant that produces a blue dye) and hyll "hill".
Oliver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 71% based on 19 votes
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

Oonagh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OO-nə
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Variant of Úna.
Ophelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ὠφελία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 78% based on 22 votes
Derived from Greek ὠφέλεια (opheleia) meaning "help, advantage". This was a rare ancient Greek name, which was either rediscovered or recreated by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this negative association, the name has been in use since the 19th century.
Parthenope
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pahr-THEHN-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 50% based on 12 votes
Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθένος (parthenos) meaning "maiden, virgin" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.
Peggy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEHG-ee
Rating: 42% based on 17 votes
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of Margaret. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
Perdita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play The Winter's Tale (1610).
Permelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 36% based on 16 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly an early American alteration of Pamela.
Philadelphia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: fil-ə-DEHL-fee-ə
Rating: 33% based on 13 votes
From the name of a city in Asia Minor mentioned in Revelation in the New Testament. The name of the city meant "brotherly love" from Greek φιλέω (phileo) meaning "to love" and ἀδελφός (adelphos) meaning "brother". It is also the name of a city in the United States.
Philander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φίλανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 35% based on 17 votes
From the Greek name Φίλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). It was the name of a son of Apollo with the nymph Acalle. In the 18th century this was coined as a word meaning "to womanize", and the name subsequently dropped out of use.
Phile
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φίλη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 19% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of Philon (see Philo).
Philo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φίλων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
From the Greek name Φίλων (Philon), which was derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This was the name of a 1st-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher and theologian from Alexandria.
Pius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: PEE-oos(Latin) PIE-əs(English)
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Late Latin name meaning "pious, dutiful". This was the name of twelve popes.
Pleasance
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: PLEHZ-əns
Rating: 29% based on 10 votes
From the medieval name Plaisance, which meant "pleasant" in Old French.
Prospero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PRAW-speh-ro
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Italian form of Prosper. This was the name of the shipwrecked magician in The Tempest (1611) by Shakespeare.
Regulus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 45% based on 17 votes
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.
Renaud
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RU-NO
Rating: 40% based on 17 votes
French form of Reynold. This name was used in medieval French literature for the hero Renaud de Montauban, a young man who flees with his three brothers from the court of Charlemagne after killing the king's nephew. Charlemagne pardons the brothers on the condition that they enter the Crusades.
Rhea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ῥέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: REH-A(Classical Greek) REE-ə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 17 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ῥέω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ἔρα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
Rhian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: REE-an
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden".
Rhiannon
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 59% based on 18 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

Richard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: RICH-ərd(English) REE-SHAR(French) REE-khart(German, Slovak) RI-khart(Czech)
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Means "brave ruler", derived from the Germanic elements ric "ruler, mighty" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.

During the late Middle Ages this name was typically among the five most common for males (with John, William, Robert and Thomas). It remained fairly popular through to the modern era, peaking in the United States in the 1940s and in the United Kingom a bit later, and steadily declining since that time.

Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), American physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988), British actor Richard Burton (1925-1984) and American musician Little Richard (1932-).

Rosabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 57% based on 17 votes
Variant of Rosabel.
Růžena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: ROO-zheh-na
Rating: 45% based on 15 votes
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".
Sabien
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Modern)
Rating: 43% based on 16 votes
Dutch form of Sabina.
Sacheverell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sa-SHEHV-ə-rəl
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was derived from a Norman place name. It was occasionally given in honour of preacher Henry Sacheverell (1674-1724).
Sadie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of Sarah.
Samantha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə(English) sa-MAN-ta(Italian)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of Samuel, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show Bewitched.
Saoirse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 51% based on 20 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
Sarah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-RA(French) ZA-ra(German) SA-rah(Arabic)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was consistently popular in the 20th century throughout the English-speaking world, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1970s and 80s.

Notable bearers include Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne, and the French actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923).

Sebastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Rating: 65% based on 19 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστός (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

Shiloh
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo(English)
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt gave it to their daughter in 2006.
Sibyl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIB-əl
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
From Greek Σίβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans imported it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel Sybil (1845).
Sibylla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, German
Pronounced: zee-BI-la(German)
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
Latinate form of Sibyl.
Sidonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Georgian
Other Scripts: სიდონია(Georgian)
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of Sidonius. This is the name of a legendary saint from Georgia. She and her father Abiathar were supposedly converted by Saint Nino from Judaism to Christianity.
Sophus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Σόφος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From the Greek name Σόφος (Sophos) meaning "skilled, clever".
Sophy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SO-fee
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
Variant of Sophie or a diminutive of Sophia.
Susan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SOO-zən
Rating: 64% based on 20 votes
English variant of Susanna. This has been most common spelling since the 18th century. It was especially popular both in the United States and the United Kingdom from the 1940s to the 1960s. A notable bearer was the American feminist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906).
Sybilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Late Roman
Pronounced: si-BYEEL-la(Polish)
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Polish form and Latin variant of Sibylla.
Sybille
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: zee-BI-lə(German) SEE-BEEL(French)
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
German and French form of Sibyl.
Taffy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: TAF-ee(English)
Rating: 12% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of Dafydd. It has been used as a slang term for a Welshman.
Taranis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Gaulish Mythology
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Derived from Celtic taran meaning "thunder", cognate with Þórr (see Thor). This was the name of the Gaulish thunder god, who was often identified with the Roman god Jupiter.
Teja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene
Rating: 41% based on 17 votes
Short form of Doroteja or Mateja 1.
Temperance
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
Personal remark: MN only
Rating: 52% based on 19 votes
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Timotheus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Latin, German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 49% based on 17 votes
Latinized form of Timotheos (see Timothy).
Tisiphone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τισιφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ti-SIF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τίσις (tisis) meaning "vengeance" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
Tobias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Τωβίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: to-BEE-as(German) tuw-BEE-ahs(Swedish) tə-BIE-əs(English)
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
Greek form of Tobiah. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
Toby
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TO-bee
Rating: 39% based on 16 votes
Medieval form of Tobias. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
Tudor 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 35% based on 19 votes
From the older Welsh name Tudur, possibly from the hypothetical Celtic name Toutorix meaning "ruler of the people" (cognate with Theodoric). As a surname it was borne by five monarchs of England beginning with Henry VII in the 15th century.
Val
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL
Rating: 41% based on 17 votes
Short form of Valentine 1, Valerie and other names beginning with Val.
Valerie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree(English) VA-lə-ree(German)
Rating: 49% based on 21 votes
English and German form of Valeria, as well as a Czech variant of Valérie.
Valeriy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Валерий(Russian) Валерій(Ukrainian) Валерый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: vu-LYEH-ryee(Russian)
Rating: 34% based on 19 votes
Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian form of Valerius.
Verity
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VEHR-i-tee
Rating: 45% based on 17 votes
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Verochka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Верочка(Russian)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Russian diminutive of Vera 1.
Viatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Earlier form of Beatrix.
Vicky
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIK-ee
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Diminutive of Victoria.
Viola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian) VI-o-la(Czech) VEE-aw-la(Slovak)
Rating: 57% based on 12 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
Violante
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-teh(Italian)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Latin form of Yolanda.
Violet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 71% based on 16 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
Violetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта(Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LEHT-ta(Italian) vyi-u-LYEHT-tə(Russian) VEE-o-leht-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 66% based on 14 votes
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of Violet.
Virginie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEER-ZHEE-NEE
Rating: 43% based on 21 votes
French form of Virginia.
Visvaldis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Latvian
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latvian name derived from the Baltic elements vis "all" and vald "rule". It is thus a cognate of the Slavic Vsevolod.
Vivian
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of Bébinn or a variant of Vivien 2.
Vladimir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владимир(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: vlu-DYEE-myir(Russian) VLA-dee-meer(Serbian, Croatian)
Rating: 59% based on 12 votes
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
Winona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Indigenous American, Sioux
Pronounced: wi-NON-ə(English)
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
Means "firstborn daughter" in Dakota. This was the name of the daughter of the 19th-century Dakota chief Wapasha III.
Yrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Scandinavian
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Medieval Scandinavian form of Jurian.
Yves
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EEV
Rating: 52% based on 13 votes
Medieval French form of Ivo 1. This was the name of two French saints: an 11th-century bishop of Chartres and a 13th-century parish priest and lawyer, also known as Ivo of Kermartin, the patron saint of Brittany.
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