Feorsteorra's Personal Name List

ABEDNEGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲבֵד־ןְגוֹ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ə-BEHD-ni-go(English)
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
Means "servant of Nebo" in Akkadian, Nebo being the Babylonian god of wisdom. In the Old Testament Abednego is the Babylonian name given to Azariah, one of the three men cast into a blazing furnace but saved from harm by God, as told in the Book of Daniel.
ACHILLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αχιλλευς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-KIL-eez(English) a-KEEL-lehs(Classical Latin)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Greek Αχιλλευς (Achilleus) which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek αχος (achos) "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's 'Iliad'. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.

This name was sometimes used as a personal name, and was borne by a few early saints, including a Roman soldier martyred with Nereus in the 1st century.

ALARIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
From the Gothic name Alareiks which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler, power". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
ALPHAEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Αλφαιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-FEE-əs(English)
From Αλφαιος (Alphaios), the Greek form of a Hebrew name that meant "changing". In the New Testament this is the name of the fathers of the apostles James and Levi.
ALURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ah-lure-ah
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Adaptation of the word allure to resemble Alora.
AMADEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs(English) ahm-ə-DEE-əs(English)
Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.
ANATOLIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ανατολιος(Ancient Greek)
From the Greek Ανατολιος (Anatolios), derived from ανατολη (anatole) meaning "sunrise". Saint Anatolius was a 3rd-century philosopher from Alexandria.
ANDROCLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ανδροκλης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-drə-kleez(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Ανδροκλης (Androkles) which meant "glory of a man", derived from ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a man who pulled a thorn from a lion's paw in one of Aesop's fables.
ANTIGONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αντιγονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 83% based on 8 votes
Derived from Greek αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and γονη (gone) "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.
ANTIGONUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αντιγονος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nəs(English)
From the Greek name Αντιγονος (Antigonos), derived from αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and γονευς (goneus) "ancestor". This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals. After Alexander died, he took control of most of Asia Minor.
ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 84% based on 9 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARISTAEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αρισταιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ar-is-TEE-əs(English)
From the Greek name Αρισταιος (Aristaios), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best". This was the name of a minor Greek god of agriculture, hunting and cattle. He was the son of Apollo and the mortal Cyrene.
ARISTOPHANES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αριστοφανης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REES-TO-PA-NEHS(Classical Greek) ar-is-TAHF-ə-neez(English)
Derived from the Greek elements αριστος (aristos) "best" and φανης (phanes) "appearing". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian playwright.
ARTEMISIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμισιος(Ancient Greek)
From an ancient Greek name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ARTEMIS.
ASPEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ATHANASIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αθανασιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ath-ə-NAY-shəs(English)
From the Greek name Αθανασιος (Athanasios) meaning "immortal", from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with θανατος (thanatos) "death". Saint Athanasius was a 4th-century bishop of Alexandria who strongly opposed Arianism.
AUGUSTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German
Pronounced: O-GUYS-TEHN(French)
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUGUSTINE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-gə-steen, aw-GUS-tin
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.
BELLAMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Probably derived from the Latin elements bella "beautiful" and mira "wondrous" (cf. Mirabella). This name belongs to a courtesan in the play 'The Jew of Malta' (written c. 1589 or 1590) by English dramatist Christopher Marlowe.
BELSHAZZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Babylonian (Anglicized), Biblical
Other Scripts: בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר(Ancient Hebrew)
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sharra-usur meaning "BEL protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before it was conquered by the Persians in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
BENEDICTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, Dutch
Pronounced: bay-nə-DIK-tus(Dutch)
Original Latin form of BENEDICT, as well as the modern Dutch form.
BESSARION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Βησσαριων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Greek βησσα (bessa) "wooded valley". This was the name of a 5th-century Egyptian hermit who was a disciple of Saint Anthony the Great. It was later adopted by the scholar Basilios Bessarion (1403-1472), a Greek born in Byzantine Anatolia who became a Roman Catholic bishop.
BRISEIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Βρισηις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: brie-SEE-is(English)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Patronymic derived from Βρισευς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
CALIBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAL-ə-ban
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
From a version of the Spanish word canibal "cannibal", with -n- and -l- interchanged, found in Hakluyt's 'Voyages' (1599). Shakespeare created this name for the savage, deformed slave of Prospero in his play 'The Tempest' (1611). It was given to one of Uranus' moons.
CASIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAZ-i-meer(English) KA-ZEE-MEER(French)
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CASSIOPEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιοπεια, Κασσιεπεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kas-ee-ə-PEE-ə(English)
Rating: 79% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιοπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιεπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CASSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-oos(Classical Latin) KASH-əs(English) KAS-ee-əs(English)
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CATRIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: ka-TREE-na, ka-TREE-o-na
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Gaelic form of KATHERINE.
CHARLEMAGNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: SHAHR-lə-mayn(English)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From Old French Charles le Magne meaning "CHARLES the Great". This is the name by which the Frankish king Charles the Great (742-814) is commonly known.
CHRISTOBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Variant of CHRISTABEL.
CORNELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Pronounced: kawr-NEE-lee-əs(English) kawr-NEH-lee-uys(Dutch) kawr-NEH-lyuws(German)
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
COSMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοσμας(Ancient Greek)
From the Greek name Κοσμας (Kosmas), which was derived from κοσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
CRESSIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KREHS-i-də(English)
Rating: 86% based on 7 votes
Medieval form of CHRYSEIS. Various medieval tales describe her as a woman of Troy, daughter of Calchus, who leaves her Trojan lover Troilus for the Greek hero Diomedes. Shakespeare's play 'Troilus and Cressida' (1602) was based on these tales.
CYGNUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Cygnus is a northern constellation lying on the plane of the Milky Way, deriving its name from the Latinized Greek word for swan.
CYPRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: TSI-pryan(Polish) SIP-ree-ən(English)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus which meant "from Cyprus" in Latin. Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
DAEDALUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δαιδαλος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEHD-ə-ləs(English) DEED-ə-ləs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Δαιδαλος (Daidalos) which was derived from δαιδαλλω (daidallo) meaning "to work cunningly". In Greek myth Daedalus was an Athenian inventor who was banished to Crete. There he designed the Labyrinth for King Minos, but he and his son Icarus were eventually imprisoned inside it because he had aided Theseus in his quest against the Minotaur. Daelalus and Icarus escaped using wings fashioned from wax, but Icarus fell from the sky to his death.
DAIDALOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δαιδαλος(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of DAEDALUS.
DAMIANOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Δαμιανος(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of DAMIAN.
DOMINIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHM-i-nik
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
DOMINICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, Dutch
Pronounced: do-MEE-nee-kus(Dutch)
Original Latin form of DOMINIC, as well as the modern Dutch form.
DUNSTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
Pronounced: DUN-stən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
DYNASTY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Possibly inspired by the popular '80s soap opera of the same name. The name derives from the English word dynasty, which is ultimately derived from Greek dunasteia meaning "power, dominion".
EDWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
ELECTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
Taken from the word “elected” meaning "chosen".

It relates to the passage in the New Testament in “John 2”, which is in the form of a letter addressed to “The Elect Lady and Her Children” (meaning the Christian church, but from early on was believed to be a real woman called Electa).

The name Electa was first used in the United States and dates back to the 1800s. It has a particular resonance in Freemasonry.

ENDYMION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ενδυμιων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ehn-DIM-ee-ən(English)
Derived from Greek ενδυειν (endyein) meaning "to dive into, to enter". In Greek mythology he was an Aeolian mortal loved by the moon goddess Selene, who asked Zeus to grant him eternal life. Zeus complied by putting him into an eternal sleep in a cave on Mount Latmos.
EPIPHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: i-PIF-ə-nee
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) which commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
ERASTUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εραστος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-RAS-təs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Εραστος (Erastos) meaning "beloved". This was the name of an assistant of Paul mentioned in Acts and two epistles in the New Testament.
EREBUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ερεβος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ə-bəs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Ερεβος (Erebos) which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
ESDRAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Εσδρας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHZ-drəs(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Greek form of EZRA. This spelling is used in parts of the Old Testament Apocrypha.
EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
FABLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY-bel
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Derived from the word for a succinct story, in prose or verse, that features animals, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature which are given human qualities, and that illustrates a moral lesson.
The word "fable" comes from the Latin fabula (a "story"), itself derived from fari ("to speak") with the -ula suffix that signifies "little".
FAIRLIGHT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
A transferred use of the surname Fairlight used as far back as the 1800's in England and the States.
FENWICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FEN-nik
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
From the surname Fenwick from Old English fenn "marsh" and wic "dwelling place", "dairy farm" or "landing place". The surname may have originated from the village of Fenwick in Ayrshire, Scotland or Northumberland, England.
GARLINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: GAR-lin-da
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
GENOVEFA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized, ?)
Rating: 60% based on 7 votes
Older form of GENEVIÈVE.
GLORINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: glo-REEN-da
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Means "worthy of glory" in Esperanto.
GREGORIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Γρηγοριος(Ancient Greek)
Ancient Greek form of GREGORY.
GREGORIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Γρηγοριος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of GREGORIOS.
GRETEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: GREH-təl
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of GRETE. This name is well-known as the character in Grimm's fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch.
GRIFFITH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GRIF-ith
Rating: 54% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of GRUFFUDD.
HATHOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Pronounced: HATH-awr(English)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Greek form of Egyptian Het-Heru which means "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian hwt "house" combined with Hr the god HORUS. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
HATSHEPSUT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: hat-SHEHP-soot(English)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Means "foremost of noble women" in Egyptian. This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.
HELIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ηλιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-LEE-OS(Classical Greek) HEE-lee-aws(English)
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, a Titan, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses. His sister was the moon goddess Selene.
HROTHGAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Variant of HROÐGAR.
HYPERION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Υπεριων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HUY-PEH-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) hie-PEER-ee-ən(English)
Derived from Greek ‘υπερ (hyper) "over". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan who presided over the sun and light. By Theia he was the father of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
IGNATIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs(English)
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by Emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
IPHIGENEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ιφιγενεια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek ιφιος (iphios) "strong, stout" and γενης (genes) "born". In Greek myth Iphigenia was the daughter of King Agamemnon. When her father offended Artemis it was divined that the only way to appease the goddess was to sacrifice Iphigenia. Just as Agamemnon was about to sacrifice his daughter she was magically transported to the city of Taurus.

In Christian tradition this was also the name of a legendary early saint, the daughter of an Ethiopian king Egippus.

ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

ISSACHAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: יִשָּׂשׁכָר(Ancient Hebrew) Ισσαχαρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IS-ə-kahr(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Possibly means "man of hire" or "there is reward", from Hebrew שָׁכַר (shakhar) meaning "hire, wage, reward". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve sons of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. A justification for the name's meaning is given in Genesis 30:18.
JAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lə
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Combination of JAY (1) and the popular name suffix la.
JOCASTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ιοκαστη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: jo-KAS-tə(English)
Rating: 78% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ιοκαστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
JOSEPHUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, History
Pronounced: YO-sə-fus(Dutch)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Latin form of JOSEPH. This form is used by Dutch Catholics. In English, it is used primarily to refer to the 1st-century Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus.
JUBILATION
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English (Puritan, Rare)
Pronounced: joo-bil-LAY-shun (Popular Culture)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
From Old French jubilacion meaning "jubilation, rejoicing" and directly from the Latin jubilationem (nominative jubilatio, noun of action from past participle stem of jubilare, meaning "to shout or sing out joyfully."

Jubilation Lee is the name of X-Men mutant protagonist Jubilee.

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUPITER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOO-pi-tər(English)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
JUVENAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Portuguese
Pronounced: JOO-və-nəl(English)
From the Roman cognomen Iuvenalis which meant "youthful" in Latin. Juvenal was a Roman satirist of the 1st century.
KENTUCKY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Of uncertain etymology, though likely from an Iroquoian name meaning "on the meadow" or "on the prairie".
LEANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λεανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λεανδρος (Leandros), derived from λεων (leon) meaning "lion" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
MALAKAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Variant of MALACHI.
MARCELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Pronounced: MA-ree-oos(Classical Latin) MEHR-ee-əs(English) MAR-ee-əs(English) MA-ryuws(German) MA-RYUYS(French)
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHD-o
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MELCHIOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: MEHL-khee-awr(Dutch) MEHL-kee-awr(English)
Possibly from the Hebrew roots מֶלֶךְ (melekh) meaning "king" and אוֹר ('or) meaning "light". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. According to medieval tradition he was a king of Persia.
MINERVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English)
Rating: 88% based on 8 votes
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MIRAMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare), Literature
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Truncares form of Semiramis. This is the name of Mio's horse in the children's book Mio, min Mio (1954) by Astrid Lindgren.
NAPHTALI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נַףְתָלִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAF-tə-lie(English)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Means "my struggle, my strife" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a son of Jacob by Rachel's servant Bilhah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.
NAUSICAA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ναυσικαα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ναυσικαα (Nausikaa) meaning "burner of ships". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of a daughter of Alcinous who helps Odysseus on his journey home.
NICODEMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Νικοδημος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: nik-ə-DEEM-əs(English)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Νικοδημος (Nikodemos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and δημος (demos) "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.
NORMANDY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Normandie
Pronounced: NOHR-mən-dee
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Normandy is region of France. It was invaded in 1944, during World War II.

In sparse use since the 1800s in the English-speaking world.

NYSA
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νυσα(Ancient Greek)
Possibly from an archaic Greek word meaning "tree". In Greek mythology Nysa was the mountainous region where young Dionysos was raised.
ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEHT
Rating: 88% based on 5 votes
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ωριων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
Meaning unknown, but possibly related to Greek ‘οριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
ORPHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, English
Other Scripts: Ορφα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AWR-fə(English)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Form of ORPAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
ORPHEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ορφευς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: OR-PEWS(Classical Greek) AWR-fee-əs(English)
Perhaps related to Greek ορφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
OTHELLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: o-THEHL-o(English)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Perhaps an Italian diminutive of OTHO. Shakespeare used this name in his tragedy 'Othello' (1603), where it belongs to a Moor who is manipulated by Iago into killing his wife Desdemona.
PASCAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: PAS-KAL(French) pas-KAL(German) pahs-KAHL(Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) meaning "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal, the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PATROCLUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Πατροκλος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pə-TRO-kləs(English)
Latinized form of the Greek Πατροκλος (Patroklos) which meant "glory of the father", derived from πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". In Greek legend he was one of the heroes who fought against the Trojans. His death at the hands of Hector drew his friend Achilles back into the war.
PEREGRINE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-grin
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PHILOKRATES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλοκρατης(Ancient Greek)
Means "friend of power" from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and κρατος (kratos) "power".
POLARIS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Astronomy, Popular Culture
Rating: 80% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Latin stella polaris, "pole star".

This is the proper Latin name of the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor, commonly called the North Star or Pole-Star. The Old English name for it was Scip-steorra "ship-star", reflecting its importance in navigation. It is the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor. It is very close to the north celestial pole, making it the current northern pole star.

Polaris is the 'mutant' name of a protagonist in Marvel's X-Men line of comics. Her real name is Lorna Dane, though she's more commonly called Polaris. As the daughter of Magneto, she inherited the mutant ability of magnetic manipulation.

PRIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Πριαμος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PRIE-əm(English)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
From the Greek Πριαμος (Priamos), possibly meaning "redeemed". In Greek legend Priam was the king of Troy during the Trojan War and the father of many children including Hector and Paris.
PROCHORUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Προχορος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Προχορος (Prochoros) which meant "leader of the dance". Saint Prochorus was one of the original seven deacons, as told in Acts in the New Testament.
REMIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Variant of JEREMIEL appearing in some versions of the Old Testament.
REUBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROO-bən(English)
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
REVERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REV-ə-ree
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
As a noun, it has been used since 1325 and is Middle English meaning "daydream" or, more literally, "fanciful musing", from Old French reverie which was derived from rever meaning "to speak wildly." As a name, there are some instances of usage in the mid to late 1800s, but it is still relatively rare, with 7 babies named Reverie in 2012.
ROLAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
Pronounced: RO-lənd(English) RAW-LAHN(French) RO-lant(German) RO-lahnt(Dutch) RO-lawnd(Hungarian)
Rating: 98% based on 6 votes
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROSMERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Pronounced: roz-MER-tə (English)
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Probably means "great provider" from Gaulish ro, an intensive prefix (hence "very, most, great"), combined with smert "purveyor, carer" and the feminine name suffix a. This was the name of an obscure Gallo-Roman goddess of fertility, abundance and prosperity. The author J. K. Rowling borrowed the name for a witch in her 'Harry Potter' series.
ROWAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
SERENITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-REHN-ə-tee
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".
SPARROW
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SPAR-o, SPEHR-o
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
TALIESIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: tal-ee-EHS-in(Welsh)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet and bard. In later Welsh legends he is portrayed as a wizard and prophet, or as a companion of King Arthur.
THELONIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Tielo (see TILO). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).
THEODORIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: thee-AHD-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "power, ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
THESEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Θησευς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-SEWS(Classical Greek) THEE-see-əs(English)
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
Possibly derived from Greek τιθημι (tithemi) meaning "to set, to place". Theseus was a heroic king of Athens in Greek mythology. He was the son of Aethra, either by Aegeus or by the god Poseidon. According to legend, every seven years the Cretan king Minos demanded that Athens supply Crete with seven boys and seven girls to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-bull creature that was the son of Minos's wife Pasiphaë. Theseus volunteered to go in place of one of these youths in order to slay the Minotaur in the Labyrinth where it lived. He succeeded with the help of Minos's daughter Ariadne, who provided him with a sword and a roll of string so he could find his way out of the maze.
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 77% based on 6 votes
Hebrew form of ZIPPORAH.
UMBRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: UM-bree-el
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Probably derived from Latin umbra meaning "shadow". This name was created by Alexander Pope for a "dusky, melancholy sprite" in his poem 'The Rape of the Lock' (1712). A moon of Uranus bears this name in his honour.
WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: REHN
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
ZERUBBABEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English (Puritan)
Other Scripts: זְרֻבָּבֶל
Pronounced: zeh-ru-BAH-bel (Biblical)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Possibly means "conceived and born in Babylon" from a contraction of either Assyrian-Babylonian Zəru Bābel "seed of Babylon" or Hebrew זְרוּעַ בָּבֶל (Zərua‘ Bāvel) "the one sown of Babylon". In the Old Testament he led the first group of Jews out of captivity in Babylon in the first year of the Persian king Cyrus.
ZOPHIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew (Hellenized), Judeo-Christian Legend, Literature
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Apparently either means "watchman of God" or "rock of God" in Hebrew. It could also be a variant of Jophiel, since the angel Jophiel is also regularly called Zophiel in various sources. This was also the name of an angel in Milton's epic "Paradise Lost."
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