Submitted Names Starting with A

 more filters...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ADORÉE f Various
Means "adored" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself. Bearer Adorée Villany (born 1891) was a French dancer and dance theorist.
ADORIA f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Adora.
ADORINE f American (Modern)
From "adore" with the popular -ine suffix.
ADORLÉE f French (Swiss, Rare)
Presumably an elaboration of Adorée.
ADORNA f Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Adorno.
ADORNO m Italian
Means "adorned" in Italian.
ADOSINDA f Ancient Germanic (Gothic), Medieval Spanish
Visigothic name possibly derived from the Germanic elements aud "wealth" and sinþs "path". This was the name of an 8th-century queen of Asturias, Spain. It was also borne by the maternal grandmother of the 10th-century Galician saint Rosendo (as well as a sister of his).
ADRA m Indian
Means "rock" or "hard".
ADRA f & m Arabic, Muslim
Meaning, "virgin."
ADRABORANN f Breton (Modern, Rare)
Feminine form of Adraboran, a Breton variant ("Bretonnisation") of the name of the star Aldebaran.
ADRAGON m English (Rare)
Combination of the prefix a and the English word dragon, a legendary serpentine or reptilian creature. Child prodigy Adragon De Mello was given the name because he was born in the Chinese year of the dragon.
ADRAMELECH m Biblical, Near Eastern Mythology, Literature
Latin form of אַדְרַמֶּלֶךְ (Adar-malik) meaning "king of fire" in Hebrew. This was the name of a Babylonian deity to whom infants were burnt in sacrifice (II Kings xvii, 31). He is possibly the sun god worshipped at Sippar (Sepharvaim)... [more]
ADRÁN m Galician
Galician form of Adrian.
ADRAN m English
Variant of Adrian.
ADRAO m Galician
Galician form of Adrian.
ADRASTAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Adrastus (see Adrastos).
ADRASTE m French
French form of Adrastus (see Adrastos).
ADRASTÉE f French
French form of Adrasteia.
ADRASTEYA f Azerbaijani (Rare), Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian, Ukrainian and Azerbaijani form of Adrasteia.
ADRASTIA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
One of the Latinized forms of Adrasteia
ADRASTO m Galician, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Galician, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Adrastus (see Adrastos).
ADRASTUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek Mythology
Latinized form of Adrastos. Traditionally translated as "nonparticipant" or "uncooperative." The king of Argos. He married his daughters to Tydeus and Polynices, both chased out of Thebes. To return his sons-in-law to their homeland, he mounted an expedition, known as the Seven Against Thebes... [more]
ADREAL m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Adriel.
ADREAM f English (Modern)
Combination of the prefix a- with Dream.
ADREANA f English
Variant of Adriana.
ADREANNA f English
Variant of Adriana.
ADREONA f English
Variant of Adriana.
ADRESTIA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant form of Adrastia, which is one of the various latinized forms of Adrasteia. In Greek mythology, this was the name of a war figure and goddess of revenge and balance, who often battled in war... [more]
ADRI f & m Italian, English, Spanish, French, Danish, Portuguese
Diminutive of Adrian, Adriana, and other names beginning with Adri.
ADRI m Indian
Indian name meaning "stone, mountain", and by extension "cloud". Some ancient Hindu beliefs claimed that mountains were solidified clouds.
ADRIA f Italian
Possibly a Latinized form of Audrey.
ADRIAEN m Medieval Dutch
Medieval Dutch form of Adriaan. A well-known bearer of this name was Adriaen van der Donck (c. 1618–1655), a pivotal figure in the establishment of the middle colonies of colonial America, and the ultimate significance of Manhattan as a place of commerce.
ADRIAL m Hebrew
Variant of Adriel.
ADRÍAN m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Adrian.
ADRIÁNA f Hungarian (Rare), Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of Adriana.
ADRIANANDIOUS m African American
African american elaborated form of Adrian.
ADRIANAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Adrian.
ADRIANE f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Adrian.
ADRIANE m Georgian
Georgian form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian).
ADRIANOS m Greek
Greek form of Adrian.
ADRIANS m Latvian
Latvian form of Adrian.
ADRIÀNU m Sicilian
Sicilian form of Adrian.
ADRIANU m Sicilian
Sicilian form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian).
ADRIC m Popular Culture
An anagram of Dirac, the surname of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Paul Dirac. This is the name of a character in the series 'Doctor Who', a companion of the fourth and fifth doctors.
ADRIE m & f Dutch
Diminutive of Adrianus and Adriana.
ADRÍEL m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Adriel.
ADRIËL m Dutch
Dutch form of Adriel.
ADRIENA f Slovak
Variant of Adriana.
ADRIESTA f English
"Adri" possibly refers back to Hadrian, where it has a Latin origin, meaning "from Hadria". Hadria is a derivative of Adria; the name is used in northern Italy where it was the name of an important Etruscan port town.... [more]
ADRIETTE f Dutch (Rare)
Feminization of Adrian (via the French form Adrien) by way of adding the French diminutive suffix -ette.
ADRIJA f Indian (Rare)
Means "daughter of the mountain". This is an epithet of Parvati.
ADRIJA f Latvian (Modern, Rare)
Possibly a short form of Adrijana.
ADRIJUS m Lithuanian
Short form of Adrianas.
ADRIKA f Indian, Hinduism
Means "small mountain" in Sanskrit. According to the Mahabharata, Adrika is an apsara (a female spirit of clouds and waters) who was the mother of Matsya and Satyavati.
ADRINA f Ancient Persian
Means "flaming lights" in Persian.
ADRIO m Italian (Tuscan, Rare)
Masculine form of Adria.
ADRIYAN m Bulgarian, Russian
Bulgarian and Russian variant of Adrian.
ADRIYANA f Bulgarian, Russian
Bulgarian and Russian variant of Adriana.
ADROA m African Mythology
The God of the Lugbara, who dwell in the area between Zaire and Uganda. Adroa had two aspects: good and evil. He was looked on as the creator of heaven and Earth, and was said to appear to a person who was about to die... [more]
ADROALDO m Spanish, Portuguese
Derived from a Germanic name that was apparently composed of the elements odal or uodal "heritage, fatherland" and wald "rule". This name was borne by several Brazilian politicians, such as Adroaldo Mesquita da Costa (1894-1985) and Adroaldo Peixoto Garani (b... [more]
ADRON m English
Possibly a variant of Adrian.
ADRYAN m Bulgarian, Russian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Bulgarian, Russian and Brazilian Portuguese variant of Adrian. A famous bearer of this name is Brazilian footballer Adryan Oliveira Tavares.
ADRYN f English
Variant of Adrienne.
ADSARTHA f Literature
Means "child of the warrior star" in Atlantean, the fictional language used in Marion Zimmer Bradley's novel, 'The Fall of Atlantis'.
ADSO m Literature
Form of Azzo. Adso da Melk is a fictional Medieval character in Umberto Eco masterpiece 'Il nome della rosa' (1980). That character is loosely based on a real person: the monk Adso de Montier-en-Der (910/915 – 992)... [more]
ADSULLATA f Celtic Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly British adsiltia "she who is gazed at". This was the name of a river goddess worshipped by the Continental Celts. It may be an older form of Esyllt.
ADUA f Tigrinya (Italian, Rare), Italian (Rare)
Italian form of ዓድዋ also spelled Adwa or Aduwa. This is an Ethiopian town whose name means "village of Awa (people)" in Tigrinya.... [more]
ADUKE f Yoruba
Means "one (people) struggle(d) to care for" in Yoruba.
ADULA f Polish
Diminutive of Ada, Adelajda, Adrianna, or other names beginning with Ad-.
ADULKA f Polish
Diminutive of Ada, Adelajda, Adrianna, or other names beginning with -AD.
ADULPHUS m Ancient Scandinavian, Old Swedish
Latinized form of Oddulf and variant of Adolphus.
ADUNA f Basque (Rare)
From the name of a town in the Basque region of Spain.
ADUOR f Eastern African, Luo
Means "born at dawn" in Luo.
ADURNARSEH m Ancient Persian
From the Middle Persian name Adurnarseh (also found written as Adarnarseh), which is derived from Middle Persian ādur (also ātur) meaning "fire" combined with the name Narseh... [more]
ADUŠ m Slovak
Diminutive of Adam.
ADUSIA f Polish
Diminutive of Ada, Adelajda, Adrianna, or other names beginning with Ad-.
ADUTĖ f Lithuanian
Diminutive of Ada.
ADUUCHIN m Mongolian
Means "horse herder" in Mongolian.
ADVAIDH m Indian (Rare)
Derived from Sanskrit अद्वैध (advaidha) meaning "united, unified" (literally "not divided into two parts, not disunited").
ADVAIT m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism
Means "not dual" in Sanskrit. One of its forms advaita is a branch of Hinduism called advaita vedanta.
ADVAITI f Indian (Rare)
Derived from Sanskrit अद्वैती (advaitī) meaning "oneness, single, unique" (literally "one without a second, without duality").
ADVAY m Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Assamese, Nepali
Means "without second, unique" in Sanskrit.
ADVESHA f Hinduism
Means "harmless, not malevolent".
ADVIJA f Bosnian
Means "swift, fast" in Bosnian.
ADVIK m Hindi, Indian
Means "unique" in Tamil.
ADVIKA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit अद्वैत (ádvaita) meaning "unrivalled, unique".
ADWAIT m Indian
There are two siddhantas (schools of thoughts) dwait and adwait. Dwait specifies duality in the universe whereas adwait specifies unity ie all is one there is no difference.
ADWEN f Welsh, Cornish
Welsh name, in which the second element is gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". It was borne by a Cornish saint, considered to be "the Cornish Saint Dwynwen" as a patron of sweethearts. The village of Advent near Camelford is named after her.
ADWENA f English
Latinate form of Adwen.
ADWIN m Akan
Means "creative" in Akan.
ADY f & m Hebrew
Variant of Adi (1).
ADYAN m Kalmyk
Means "sun" in Kalmyk.
ADYANA f Buryat, Kalmyk
Feminine form of Adyan.
ADYLET m & f Kyrgyz (Rare), Kazakh (Rare)
Variant transcription of Adilet.
ADYMUS m Greek Mythology
The Minoan epithet for the morning star and evening star.
ADYSEN f American
Variant of Addison.
ADZE f & m African Mythology
The adze is a vampiric being in Ewe folklore. It takes the form of a firefly and will transform into human form upon capture.... [more]
ADZIA f Polish
Diminutive of Ada, Adelajda, Adrianna, or other names beginning with Ad-.
ADZUMI f Japanese
From Japanese 愛 (a) meaning "love, affection", 月 (dzu) meaning "moon" combined with 心 (mi) meaning "heart, mind, soul". Other kanji combinations are possible.
ADZUSA f Japanese
Variant transcription of Azusa.
AE m Manx (Archaic)
Manx cognate of Áed.
AEACIDES m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek given name Aἰακίδης (Aiakides), which may possibly be related to the Greek word akidēs meaning "stings" as well as "cares, troubles". In turn, that word is related to Greek ἀκίς (akis) meaning "pointed object" (such as an arrow, barb or dart)... [more]
AEACUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αἰακός (Aiakos), which was either derived from Greek ἄϊσσω (aisso) meaning "to run" or from Greek αιακτος (aiaktos) meaning "lamentable, wailing"... [more]
AEBIG m Low German (Archaic)
Short form of Adalbert, used in the 16th century.
AECHMAGORAS m Greek Mythology
In Greek Mythology, the son of Heracles and Phialo.
AÉCIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Aetius.
AECIO m Spanish
Spanish form of Aetius.
ÁEDACÁN m Ancient Irish
Ancient Irish masculine name meaning "fire".
ÁEDAMMAIR f Medieval Irish
Derived from Áed (see Aodh).
AEDAN m English, Manx
Anglicized form of Áedán as well as a Manx cognate of this name via Manx Ae.
AEDD m Welsh, Irish
From the Irish aedh "fire". This name was borne by a king of Ireland.
AEDDAN m Welsh Mythology, Celtic Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Welsh form of Áedán and diminutive of AEDD. In Welsh Legend, Aeddan was the son of Caw, a Pictish overlord. He was an enemy of King Arthur.
AEDIA f Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of Aedius, a Roman family name.
AEDIE m Scots
Diminutive of Aidam.
AEDIUS m Ancient Roman
A Roman family name.
AEDNAT f Irish (Modern, Rare)
Possibly related to Aodh. A minor character in the Cirque du Freak franchise.
AËDON f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἀηδών (aēdōn) "songstress" or from Greek ἀηδονίς (aēdonis) "nightingale". Also compare Greek ἀοιδή (aoidē) meaning "song". This was the name of a legendary queen of Thebes who plotted to kill her rival Niobe's son, but killed her own son accidentally... [more]
AEDONA f Italian (Rare), Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Italian, Russian and Ukrainian form of Aëdon.
AEDOS f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αιδως (Aidos) which meant "modesty, decency". In Greek mythology, Aedos was a goddess or daimona of modesty, reverence and respect and a companion of the goddess Nemesis.
AEDUMANDA f Celtic Mythology (Latinized)
Reconstructed old Celtic form of Aimend.... [more]
AEDUS m Irish (Latinized, Archaic)
Possibly a Latinized form of Aodh.... [more]
AEE m & f Hmong
AEËTES m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αἰήτης (Aiêtês), possibly derived from Greek αἴητος (aiêtos) "terrible, mighty". In Greek mythology Aeëtes was a king of Colchis in Asia Minor (modern Georgia) and the father of Medea... [more]
ÆFFIC m Medieval English
Diminutive of Afa.
ÆFSATI m Ossetian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Ossetian protector of wild animals, deer, boars, and mountain goats.
AEGA f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, she nursed Zeus (when Rhea gave Cronus a stone to swallow instead of the new-born Zeus). She is sometimes a woman, sometimes a nymph, and sometimes the daughter of gods. Her name is either connected with the Ancient Greek αίξ, which signifies a "goat", or with άιξ, a "gale of wind"; and this circumstance has led some critics to consider the myth about her as made up of two distinct ones, one being of an astronomical nature and derived from the constellation Capella, the rise of which brings storms and tempests, and the other referring to the goat which was believed to have suckled the infant Zeus in Crete.
AEGAEON m Greek Mythology
Means "stormy one", "goatish", or "Aegean" in Greek. Aegaeon is the god of the storms of the Aegean Sea in Greek mythology.
AEGEA f Greek Mythology
She was sister to Circe and Pasiphae, and daughter of the sun. When the Titans attacked the gods of Olympus, Gaia placed Aegea in a cave to hide her shining loveliness.
ÆGEN m Anglo-Saxon
Diminutive of names beginning with Ægen, such as Ægenbald and Ægenwulf.
ÆGENBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and beald "bold".
ÆGENWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and wulf "wolf".
AEGEUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αἰγεύς (Aigeus), which is a variant form of Aigeas. Aegeus, an Athenian king, was the son of Pandion and the brother of Pallas, Nisos and Lykos. He is best known as being the father of the hero Theseus.
AEGIALE f Greek Mythology
The daughter of Adrastus and Amphithea. She married Diomedes but was unfaithful to him during his absence.
AEGIALEUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αἰγιαλεύς (Aigialeus), which is derived from Greek αἰγιαλός (aigialos) meaning "beach, sea-shore". Also compare Greek αἴξ (aix) meaning "a tall wave"... [more]
ÆGILL m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Egill.
AEGINA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αιγινη (Aigine), which is of unknown meaning, perhaps an alternative name for the plant known as Etruscan honeysuckle in English. In Greek mythology she was a naiad loved by Zeus, who abducted her in the form of an eagle, carrying her off to the island of Attica... [more]
ÆGIR m Norse Mythology
Means "sea, ocean" in Old Norse. Ægir was the Norse god of the sea, whom sailors both worshipped and feared, for they believed he would occasionally appear on the surface to take ships, men and cargo alike, with him to his hall at the bottom of the ocean.
AEGISTHUS m Greek Mythology
The son of Thyestes and his daughter Pelopea.
AEGLEIS f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αἰγληίς (Aigleis), a derivative of αἴγλη (aigle) meaning "radiance, splendour" (compare Aegle). In Greek mythology this name belonged to one of the Hyacinthides, the four daughters of Hyacinthus the Lacedaemonian, who was said to have moved to Athens and, in compliance with an oracle, to have caused his daughters to be sacrificed by the Athenians on the tomb of the Cyclops Geraestus for the purpose of delivering the city from famine and the plague, under which it was suffering during the war with Minos.
ÆGLI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Egill.
AEGNOR m Literature
Sindarin form of Aikanáro. In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Aegnor is an Elf, the brother of Finrod, Galadriel, Angrod and Orodreth. He fell in love with the mortal woman Andreth.
AEGON m Literature, Popular Culture
Derived from the Germanic element ag "edge of a sword" and the Greek word αγώνας (agónas) "struggle". This is the name of multiple characters in George R. R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series, as well as the TV show based on the books 'Game of Thrones'.
AEGYPTUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Aigyptos (Αἴγυπτος), derived from Amarna Hikuptah, which corresponds to Egyptian Ha(t)-ka-ptah "temple of the soul of Ptah". Historically one of the names of Memphis, it was taken by the Greeks to be the name of the whole country.... [more]
ÆILÆIFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Old Norse einn "one, alone" and leifr "descendent" or ǣvi "life" and leifr "descendent", as well as a variant of ØylæifR.
ÆILAFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of ÆilæifR.
ÆINRIÐI m Ancient Scandinavian
Ancient Scandinavian name with the combination of einn "one, alone" and Old Norse ríða meaning "to ride", a combination of einn "one, alone" and Old Norse reiða meaning "to swing (a sword)" or a variant form of Einráði.
ÆISTI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Æistr.
ÆISTMAÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse eistr "Estonians" and maðr "man".
ÆISTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse eistr "Estonians".
AEJAY m & f English
Phonetic spelling of the initials AJ.
AE-JEONG f Korean
Means "love, affection", from Sino-Korean 愛情.
AEJI f Korean
From Sino-Korean 愛 (ae) meaning "love, affection" and 智 (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or 地 (ji) meaning "earth, soil, ground". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
AEKA f Japanese
From Japanese 亜 (a) meaning "second, Asia", 依 (e) meaning "rely on" combined with 霞 (ka) meaning "mist". Other kanji combinations are possible.
ÆKHSÆRTÆG m Ossetian Mythology, Ossetian, Caucasian Mythology
This was the name of a main character in the Ossetian epic Nart. He was the father of Uarkhaga, husband of Saynagon, and twin brother of Akhsara. Today, his name (along with the variants Akhsar, Akhsartag, and Akhsarbek) are commonly given to Ossetian boys.
ÆKHSAR m Ossetian
Means "bravery" in Ossetian.
AEKO f Japanese (Rare)
This name can be used as 亜依子, 亜衣子 or 安衣子 with 亜 (a, tsu.gu) meaning "Asia, come after, rank next", 安 (an, yasu, yasu.i, yasu.maru, yasu.raka, a) meaning "cheap, contented, low, peaceful, quiet, relax, rested", 依 (i, e, yo.ru) meaning "consequently, depend on, due to, reliant, therefore" and 衣 (i, e, kinu, -gi, koromo) meaning "clothes, dressing, garment."... [more]
AEL m Breton (Modern)
Directly taken from Breton ael "angel".
AELA f Breton (Modern)
Feminine form of Ael and cognate of Angela.
ǢLĀF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Olaf.
AELAN m Arabic, Muslim
Possibly a transcription of عِلان meaning "announcement, proclamation" in Arabic.
AELDIET f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. It has been speculated, however, to be a corruption of Old English Ealdgyth.
AELENS m Arthurian Romance
Father of Escol, a follower of king Arthur.
AELESIA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Alicia.
AELEVA f Medieval English
Younger form of Old English Ælfgifu created with the Germanic elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and ewa meaning "ever." Compare Aelfeva.
AELEZ f Breton (Rare)
Variant of Aela. The name coincides with Breton aelez "angels".
ÆLFHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Alfher.
ÆLFRÚN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and rún "secret, hidden knowledge, mystery, dark mysterious statement" (also "a runic letter").
ÆLFWARU f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and waru (plural wara) "guard" (i.e., guardian of a particular place by profession).
ÆLFWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weald "leader, ruler".
ÆLFWYNN f Anglo-Saxon
Means "elf joy" from Old English ælf "elf" and wynn "joy". It was borne by a granddaughter of Alfred the Great.
AELHAEARN m Welsh
Derived from Welsh ael meaning "(eye)brow" and haearn "iron". This was the name of a 7th-century saint.
AELHEARN m Welsh
Variant of Aelhaearn.
AELIAN m English, History
English form of Aelianus. A bearer of this name was Claudius Aelianus - often called Aelian in English - a Roman author and philosopher from the 3rd century AD.
AELIN f Literature
Possibly inspired by Aylin. It is the name of a character in the 'Throne of Glass' series by Sarah J. Maas.
AELÍS f Occitan
Original Occitan form of Aélis.
AELITA f Literature, Latvian, Russian
Created by Russian and Soviet author Alexei Tolstoy for his science fiction novel 'Aelita or, The Decline of Mars' (1923), where it belongs to a Martian princess. Allegedly the name is common in Eastern Europe.
ÆLLE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "all, universal" in Old English. It was borne by several Anglo-Saxon kings, including the legendary first king of the South Saxons.
AELLIC m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and lic with the contested meaning of "like" or "body."
ÆLLING m Medieval English
Ælling is a masculine Old English name in which an uncompounded name (Ælla, Ælli, or Alla) has been combined with the suffix –ing.
AELLO f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἄελλα (aella) "whirlwind, tempest". This was the name of a "storm-swift" harpy in Greek myth.
AELLOPOS f Greek Mythology
Means "swift-footed like a storm-wind" or "storm-footed" from Greek aella "storm wind" and pous "foot". In Greek myth this was the name of a harpy. It was also an epithet of the goddess Iris, the messenger of the gods.
AELLOPUS f Greek Mythology
An epithet of the Harpy Aello meaning "whirlwind-footed".
AELOD m Medieval English, Welsh
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and Auð meaning "wealth, fortune."
AELPHABA f Literature
Variant of Elphaba. In the novel 'Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West' (1995), this was the name of a legendary saint, Elphaba's namesake, who disappeared behind a waterfall for hundreds of years to read a book.
ÆLRIC m Medieval English
Derived from Old English æl "hall, temple" and ric "power", making the name a cognate of Alberich.
AELTJE f Dutch (Rare, Archaic)
Obsolescent variant of Aaltje primarily used in the 1600s and briefly between the 1930s and the 1960s.
AELWEN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white; fair; blessed". This name has been used from the early 20th century onwards.
AELYTH f Anglo-Saxon (Anglicized, Rare), Popular Culture
Of Anglo-Saxon origin, this soft name has several strong meanings, the Anglo-Saxon one being, “seasoned warrior.” It’s the medieval form of Æðelgyð, which means “noble war.” Aelythis also thought to be a variant spelling of the Scottish Gaelic Alyth, meaning “ascending, rising”... [more]
AEMILIAN m English, History
English form of Aemilianus. This name was borne by a Roman Emperor from the 3rd century AD.
AEMON m Literature, Pop Culture
Possibly derived from Amon. This is the name of a character in George R. R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series, as well as the TV show based on the books 'Game of Thrones'.
AEN m & f Zhuang
Means "grace" in Zhuang.
AENE m & f Arabic
Variant transcription of Ain.
AENEA f Literature
Possibly intended to be a feminine form of Aeneas, or possibly taken from the Latin word aēneus meaning "made of copper, made of bronze; brazen" (feminine aēnea), a derivative of aes "copper, bronze"... [more]
AENESIDEMUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ainesidemos. Known bearers of this name include the ancient Greek philosopher Aenesidemus (1st century BC) and a tyrant of Leontini (5th century BC).
AENETE f Greek Mythology
Derived from αἰνή (aene) meaning either "horrible" or "praised".
AÉNȮHEA'EOTSE m Cheyenne
Means "attacking/charging hawk", from the Cheyenne aénohe 'hawk' and -a'eotse 'attack/charge'.
AENNE f German
Variant of Anna.
ÆNNIBRANTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse enni "forehead" and brattr "steep".
AENON m Biblical
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament, which may be the Greek form of Hebrew ay-yin "spring, natural fountain". The Gospel of John (3:23) identifies it as a place near Salem where John the Baptist performed baptisms.... [more]
ÆON f Popular Culture
Used by animator Peter Chung for his character Æon Flux, from the name of a type of spirit being in Gnosticism, an emanation from the Godhead, ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European base meaning "vital force, life, long life, eternity".... [more]
AEONE f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Ione, borne by British singer-songwriter Aeone Victoria Watson (1959-).
AE-OYNA-KAMUY m Far Eastern Mythology
A Kamuy (god or spirit) in Ainu mythology. Described as a man encircled by smoke and flame, under which he wears a coat of bark, he is said to have taught humans domestic skills, earning him the moniker Aynurakkur ("father of humanity").
AEQUITAS m & f Roman Mythology
Means "equity, equality, fairness" in Latin. During the Roman Empire, Aequitas as a divine personification was part of the religious propaganda of the emperor, under the name Aequitas Augusti, which also appeared on coins... [more]
AE-RA f Korean
From Sino-Korean 愛 "love" and 羅 "net for catching birds". A famous bearer is South Korean actress Shin Ae-ra (1969-).
AERACURA f Celtic Mythology
Of unclear origin. It has been connected with Latin aes, aeris "copper, bronze, money, wealth" as well as era "mistress" and the name of the Greek goddess Hera.... [more]
AERES f Welsh (Modern, Rare)
Allegedly directly taken from Welsh aeres "heiress".
AERFEN f Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Aerten, the name of a Brythonic goddess of fate. Aerten is derived from Proto-Celtic *agro- "carnage, slaughter" (cf. Agrona) and *tan-nu "to broaden, to spread" or *ten-n-d-o- "to break, to cut"... [more]
AERGIA f Greek Mythology
The name of the Ancient Greek personification of sloth and idleness. Her name means "inactivity".
AE-RI f Korean
From Sino-Korean 愛 "love" and 利 "gains, advantage, profit, merit". A famous bearer is South Korean actress Jung Ae-ri (1960-).