Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Libera f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of wine, fertility, and freedom who empowers the woman to release her semen. See also Liber.
Libertas f Roman Mythology
Derived from the Latin noun libertas meaning "freedom, liberty". In Roman mythology, Libertas was the name of the goddess of liberty.
Libi f Hindi, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Indian, Marathi, Nepali, Gujarati, Bengali, Assamese, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Indian (Sikh)
MEANING - wrting, handwriting, manuscript ... [more]
Libya f Greek Mythology
Libya is the daughter of Epaphus, King of Egypt, in both Greek and Roman mythology. She personified the land of Ancient Libya in North Africa, from which the name of modern-day Libya originated.
Licarayen f Mapuche, New World Mythology
Composed of Mapuche lica meaning "stone" and rayen "flower" (compare Rayen). In legend the beautiful maiden Licarayen sacrificed herself in order to stop the wrath of the evil spirit of the volcano Osorno from destroying her people; it was from the ashes and snow of her sacrifice that Lake Llanquihue in Chile was created.
Licorus m Greek Mythology, Literature
Licorus is a form of the name Lycorus.In Greek mythology, Lycorus was a son of the god Apollo. After him a city was named Lycoreia.This is the name of Licorus Black, a character in the "Harry Potter" series written by J.K. Rowling.
Liễu Hạnh f Far Eastern Mythology
A Vietnamese mother goddess. Her name is derived from liễu meaning "willow" and hạnh meaning "almond".
Líf f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic variant of Hlíf. In Norse mythology, Líf and Lífþrasir are the only people to survive Ragnarǫk and become the ancestors of the post-Ragnarǫk human race.
Lífþrasir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "the one striving after life". In Norse mythology Líf and Lífþrasir are the only people to survive Ragnarǫk].
Lilaea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Directly taken from Greek λιλαία meaning "lilac". In Greek mythology, Lilaea was a Naiad of a spring of the same name, daughter of the river god Cephissus. The ancient city of Lilaea and the modern village of Lilaia in Phocis are named after her.
Lile m & f Caucasian Mythology, Svan (Rare), Georgian
As a Svan name, this name is strictly masculine. It comes from the name of the Svan sun god Lile, whose name is thought to be etymologically related to that of the Sumerian god Enlil.... [more]
Lilinoe f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
From the word meaning "fine mist." A deity in Hawaiian mythology goes by this name, associated with Mauna Kea alongside Poliʻahu and Waiau.
Liluri f Near Eastern Mythology
Entymology unknown. This was the name of an ancient Syrian goddess of mountains.
Limenia f Greek Mythology
Means "of the harbour", derived from Greek λιμήν (limên) "harbour". This was an epithet of the Greek goddesses Aphrodite, Hera, and Artemis.
Limnaea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Λιμναία (Limnaia), from Greek λιμναῖος (limnaios) "of a lake". This was an epithet of the goddess Artemis at Sicyon, near Epidaurus, and also used of nymphs.
Limpi f Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Hinduism, Indian, Nepali, Tamil, Kannada
MEANING - writing, script... [more]
Limu m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 力 (lì, meaning “strength”) and 牧 (mù, meaning “to herd”). In Chinese mythology this name belonged to one of the greatest retainers of the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan)... [more]
Lindus m Greek Mythology
A character in Greek Mythology, and the son of Cercaphus and Cydippe or Lysippe, and grandson of Helios; in conjunction with whom he possessed the island of Rhodes, where he was regarded as the founder of the town of Ialysus.
Linglun m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
In Chinese mythology, Linglun was a retainer of the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan) who was said to have invented music. He made flutes that mimicked the songs of many bird species and devised the Chinese 5-tone music scale... [more]
Líobhan f Irish Mythology
Form of the Gaelic name Lí Ban, meaning "beauty of women". It belonged to two characters in Irish myth, one a mermaid captured in Lough Neagh in 558, according to the 'Annals of the Four Masters' (see also Muirgen).
Liriope f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Leiriope, which literally means "the face of leirion". Leirion was another name that the ancient Greeks had for the daffodil flower. In Greek mythology, Liriope was the name of a nymph.
Litae f Greek Mythology
THE LITAI (Litae) were the personified spirits (daimones) of prayer, ministers of the god Zeus. They were described as hobbling, old women. Their opposite number was Ate, the spirit of delusion and folly, in whose wake they followed.
Litavis f Celtic Mythology
Litavis is a Gallic deity whose cult is primarily attested in east-central Gaul during the Roman period. She was probably an earth-goddess. Her name is derived from Gaulish Litavi- "earth; the vast one" (ultimately from Proto-Celtic *flitawī- "broad").
Litr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "the coloured one". In Norse mythology Litr is a dwarf who gets in Thor's way as he is about to consecrate Baldr's funeral pyre with Mjǫllnir... [more]
Liuba f Slavic Mythology
Derived from the Slavic element lyuby "love", this was the name of the Sorbian and Wendish goddess of spring, love and fertility.
Liyu f Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 丽 (lì, meaning “beautiful”) and 娱 (yú, meaning “amusement” or “to make happy”). In Chinese mythology Liyu was a secondary wife to the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan) who was said to have invented cooking... [more]
Ljóta f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Ljót. In Norse mythology this is a typical name for giantesses.
Lobel m Croatian (Rare), Slavic Mythology
An old Croatian name of unknown meaning.... [more]
Locika f Folklore
From the Czech word for the Lactuca plant (lettuce). This is the Czech name for Rapunzel (the fairy tale character). This isn't a personal name in Czech.
Locrus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name which means "Locrian".
Locutius m Roman Mythology
God that enabled children to form sentences.
Loddfáfnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of loddari ("juggler") and Fáfnir. In Norse mythology this is the name of a young man Odin advises.
Lofarr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from lof ("permission; paean of praise") and herr ("army"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Lofn f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "the comforter; the mild". In Norse mythology this is the name of a goddess who receives permission from Odin and Frigg to bring together men and women whose marriage was previously forbidden.
Lofnheiðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of lof ("permission; praise") and heiðr ("bright, clear; honour"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology, the daughter of Hreiðmarr and the sister of Reginn, Fáfnir, Otr and Lyngheiðr.
Loge m Norse Mythology, Astronomy
Variant of Logi. He is a fire giant from Norse mythology, son of Fornjót, sometimes confused with the god Loki... [more]
Logi m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "flame, blaze" in Old Norse. In Norse legend Logi was "a handsome king of a land north of Norway. A descendant of giants, his name became Hálogi - "tall Logi" - the legendary source of the modern Hålogaland region of Norway… His daughters were Eisa and Eimyrja, names both meaning "embers", and his wife's name Glöd probably means "red-hot embers" - all suggestive that Logi is a personification and deity of fire" (K.M. Sheard, 2011).
Lohrasp m Persian, Persian Mythology, Literature
Persian form of the Avestan compound name Aurvataspa or Arvataspa, which consists of Avestan aurva meaning "swift" and Avestan aspa meaning "horse". As such, the meaning of this name is basically "swift horse" or "one who has a swift horse".... [more]
Lomna f Judeo-Christian Legend
This name was used for the wife of Peleg in the Book of Jubilees.
Lona f Polynesian Mythology
Lona is a Hawaiian moon goddess. She fell in love with a married a mortal called ʻAikanaka. Lona and ʻAikanaka lived happily together until ʻAikanaka succumbed to old age.
Lóni m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "the shining one" or "the lazy one". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Lono m Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
The god of "peace and prosperity, wind and rain" in Hawaii.
Loptr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly from Old Norse lopt "air". This is an alternative name for the Norse god Loki, used in the epic works 'Poetic Edda' and 'Prose Edda' by Snorri Sturluson... [more]
Loreley f Germanic Mythology, Spanish
Older German form of Lorelei. This was the pen name of Mexican writer María Luisa Garza (1887-1980). It is also borne by Argentine model and actress Luisana Loreley Lopilato (1987-), the wife of Canadian singer Michael Bublé.
Losna f Etruscan Mythology
An Etruscan goddess of the moon.
Lotis f Greek, Greek Mythology
From the Greek word λωτός (lotos) meaning “lotus tree”. Lotis was a river nymph that transformed into a lotus tree to avoid Priapus.
Loxias m Greek Mythology
Greek “the obscure”.... [more]
Loxo f Greek Mythology
The name of one of the Hyperborian nymphs who accompanied Artemis. The name is ultimately derived from the word λοξος (loxos) meaning "slant, trajectory".
Lua f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Lua was a goddess to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons. Her name is thought to be derived from Latin luo "to set free".... [more]
Lubal m Judeo-Christian Legend
One of the sons of Magog in the Book of Jasher.
Lubanga m African Mythology
A god of good health of the Bunyoro People of Uganda.
Lulal m Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology, Lulal, inscribed dlú.làl in cuneiform, is the younger son of Inanna. He was the patron deity of Bad-tibira while his older brother, Shara was located at neighboring Umma.
Lumisirkku f Folklore
Means "snow bunting (a type of bird)" in Finnish, composed of lumi "snow" (see Lumi) and sirkku "bunting" (referring to a bird of the genus Emberiza; see Sirkku)... [more]
Luonnotar f Finnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish luonto meaning "nature". In the Kalevala this is another name for Ilmatar.
Lupercus m Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Personal name from Medieval Latin “lŭpus”, meaning “wolf”. Lupercus in Roman mythology was considered a pastoral deity invoked to protect the fertility. In his honor were celebrated on February 15, in a cave on the Palatine Hill... [more]
Lur f Basque Mythology
Means "earth" in Basque.... [more]
Lurra f Basque Mythology
Variant of Lur. A feminine, positive entity that relates to fecundity. Unlimited in all directions, she includes the stars, moon and sun inside her borders... [more]
Luscinia f English (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Italian (Rare), Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin luscinia "nightingale". This was an epithet of the Roman goddess Minerva. As an English name, it has been used sparingly since the 19th century.
Luʻukia f Polynesian Mythology, Hawaiian (Rare)
Name of A legendary chiefess, sister of Kāwelu, daughter or wife of ʻOlopana.
Luwu m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
The name of a deity found in the Shanhaijing (山海经), or Classic of Mountains and Seas. It has the face of a human, the body of a tiger and nine tails. It acts as a groundskeeper for the supreme heavenly god Di, watching over his gardens on Mount Kunlun as well as the Nine Domains of Heaven.
Luxovius m Celtic Mythology
The Gaulish god of the waters of Luxeuil. Consort of Bricta.
Lycaethus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name derived from λύκος (lýkos) meaning "wolf" and an unknown second element.
Lycaste f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λυκαστη (Lykaste), which is of unknown meaning. This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, including a woman of Lemnos who slew her twin brother Cydimus.
Lycidas m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), Literature
Latinized form of Lykidas. This was the name of a centaur from Greek mythology.... [more]
Lycius m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Lykios. This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo. It was used by John Keats for the hero of his poem 'Lamia' (1819).
Lycomedes m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology
Latinized form of Lykomedes. In Greek mythology, King Lycomedes of Scyros is the maternal grandfather of Neoptolemus.
Lycorias f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λυκωριάς (Lykorias). In Greek myth this was the name of a sea-nymph, daughter of Nereus and Doris.
Lycorus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Lykoros. In Greek mythology, Lycorus was a son of the god Apollo. A city was named Lycoreia in his honour.
Lykaon m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Possibly derived from Greek λυκος (lykos) "wolf". In Greek mythology, this is the name of an early king of Arkadia.
Lykidas m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "son of Lykos" in Greek, derived from the name Lykos combined with ίδας (idas), which is the Aeolic and Doric Greek form of the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides).
Lykios m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "Lycian" in Greek, referring to a person from the province of Lycia in Asia Minor. The Greeks connected the place name with λύκος (lykos) "wolf"... [more]
Lynceus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λυγκεύς (Lynkeus), though technically Lygkeus is the correct spelling. The name is a more elaborate form of Lynkos (see Lyncus)... [more]
Lyncus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λύγκος (Lynkos), though technically Lygkos is the correct spelling. It is derived from Greek λύγξ (lynx) - technically lygx - which refers to the feline animal of the same name... [more]
Lyngheiðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Germanic name elements lyng "heather" and heiðr "honour". This is the name of a Dwarf from Norse mythology.
Lyngvi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse lyng ("heather"). In Norse mythology this is the name of the island in the lake Ámsvartnir where Fenrisúlfr is chained until Ragnarǫk.
Lysianassa f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek elements λυσις (lysis) "releasing, freeing, deliverance" and ανασσα (anassa) "queen". This was borne by several minor characters in Greek mythology, including a daughter of King Priam of Troy, and one of the Nereids.
Lysidice f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Λυσιδίκη (Lysidikê), derived from λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening, freeing, deliverance" and δικη (dike) "justice"... [more]
Lysippe f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "she who lets loose the horses" in Greek from the elements λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". In Greek myth, this was the name of an Amazon queen who lived not long before the Trojan War... [more]
Lysithea f Greek Mythology, Astronomy
Derived from the Greek elements λύσις (lysis) "releasing, freeing, deliverance" and θεός (theos) "god"... [more]
Lytta f Greek Mythology
Attic form of Lyssa 2.
Ma f Sumerian Mythology
Means "land" in Sumerian. In Sumerian mythology, Ma is referred to as the mother of the mountain.
Maahin m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Sinhalese, Indian, Telugu, Bengali, Marathi, Malayalam, Nepali, Kannada
Means "causing or feeling joy, dominion, mighty or powerful, blithe".
Ma'at f Egyptian Mythology
Ma'at refers to the ancient Egyptian concepts of truth, balance, order, harmony, law, morality, and justice. Maat was also the goddess who personified these concepts, and regulated the stars, seasons, and the actions of mortals and the deities who had brought order from chaos at the moment of creation... [more]
Mabior m Dinka, African Mythology
Means "white bull" in Dinka. The white bull is the most prized and is sought after for sacrifices in celebration.
Macareus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Μακαρεύς (Makareus), which is a variant form of Makarios (see Macario). This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a companion to Odysseus on his voyages.
Macha f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Proto-Celtic *makajā "plain (level country)". In Irish legend this was the name of a war goddess, sister of the Morrígan and the Badb... [more]
Machaon m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek verb μαχάω (machao) meaning "to wish to fight". Also compare the related name Machon.
Macistus m Greek Mythology
Doric Greek masculine name meaning "tallest" or "greatest".
Macris f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Μακρις (Makris), which is possibly derived from Greek μακρός (makros) "large, long; far, distant" or μάκαρ (makar) "blessed, happy" (compare Makarios).
Madana m Hinduism
Means "intoxicating, maddening" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Kamadeva, the Hindu god of love and desire.
Maetsill m Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Maetsill is the Vainakh god of agriculture and harvest and the protector of the weak.
Mafdet f Egyptian Mythology
Name of the Egyptian goddess of judgement, justice and execution, her name meaning "she who runs". It is believed that she is the first feline deity, predating Bastet and Sekhmet, and she is often depicted as a feline or a woman with the head of a feline... [more]
Maganda f Philippine Mythology
Means "beautiful" in Tagalog. In Philippine mythology, she and Malakas were the first humans. They were said to have sprung from a large bamboo tree pecked by a sarimanok (mythical bird) known as Magaulancealabarca.
Magec f & m Guanche Mythology
Magec (Guanche Berber Ma-ɣeq, "possesses radiance" or "mother of brightness"), in Tenerife, was a deity in the ancient Berber mythology. He or she was god or goddess (actual gender is unknown) of the Sun and the light and also thought to be one of the principal divinities in Guanche religion... [more]
Maggila f Baltic Mythology
Alleged Prussian Lithuanian goddess of wrath.... [more]
Magor m Hungarian, Hungarian Mythology
According to Simon of Kéza's 'Gesta Hunnorum et Hungarorum', written in the 1280s, Magor is the brother of Hunor and the son of Enéh and Ménrót... [more]
Magu f Far Eastern Mythology
The name of a taoist immortal associated with the elixir of life and protection of women. Her name is derived from 麻 (ma) meaning "cannabis, hemp" and 姑 (gu) meaning "aunt, maid, maiden".
Mahalakshmi f Indian, Hinduism, Hindi
From Sanskrit महालक्ष्मी (Mahalakshmi) meaning "great sign", derived from Sanskrit महा (maha) "great" and लक्ष्मी (lakshmi) "sign, mark".
Maheen m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Nepali, Marathi, Hinduism, Telugu, Sinhalese, Malayalam, Kannada, Assamese, Punjabi, Bengali
MEANING - "earth-ruler" ,king, prince. Here मही means earth + इन means ruler
Maheshani f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi (Modern), Bengali, Nepali, Tamil, Sinhalese, Malayalam, Telugu
MEANING - " great lady", Godess Durga (great Goddess)
Maheshi f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Gujarati, Punjabi, Bengali, Indian (Sikh), Marathi, Nepali, Sinhalese
MEANING - "wife of great lord Shiva", A name of goddess Durga
Mahetsi m & f New World Mythology
From Hñähñu language HEAVEN, SKY
Mahi f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Marathi, Bengali, Malayalam, Indian, Gujarati, Hindi, Punjabi
MEANING - earth, great, intellect, greatness, exceedingly
Mahie f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Nepali, Marathi, Sinhalese, Tamil, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali
MEANING - the earth, cow, heaven & earth, soil, streams
Mahim m Hindi, Sanskrit, Marathi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Assamese, Gujarati, Bengali
MEANING - Great; Glorious ; Powerful; Glory, might
Mahin m Sanskrit, Hindi, Telugu, Indian, Tamil, Hinduism, Marathi, Assamese, Gujarati
MEANING - mighty, great, sovereignty, dominion
Mahina f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Means "moon, month" in Hawaiian, from Proto-Polynesian *masina. In Hawaiian mythology, Mahina is a lunar deity and the mother of Hema.
Mahsuri f Malay, Folklore
From Malay maha meaning "great" and suri meaning "queen". This is the name of a legendary woman from the Malaysian island of Langkawi who was executed for adultery.
Mahuika f Polynesian Mythology, Maori (Rare)
Combination of the name Maui and the Polynesian root hika "to rub, to burn". In Māori mythology, Mahuika is a fire deity and the wife of Auahitūroa... [more]
Maira f Greek Mythology
One of the Erasinides, nymphs of the river Erasinus, whose name is derived from the word μαρμαιρο (marmairo) meaning "sparkling".
Maitagarri f Basque, Basque Mythology
Derived from the Basque adjective maitagarri "lovable; nice; affable".... [more]
Maka f Sioux, New World Mythology
Means "earth, ground, soil" in Lakota. In Oglala Lakota (Sioux) mythology, Makȟá (less correctly spelled Maka) was created by Íŋyaŋ ("stone"), then given the spirit Makȟá-akáŋl ("earth goddess").
Makaria f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek Μακαρία "bliss", this was the name of a minor Greek goddess and the personification of a blessed death. She was the daughter of Hades and Persephone.
Makemake m Polynesian Mythology
From the Rapa Nui mythology of Easter Island, was the creater of humanity and the god of fertility. A notable use of the name is for the fourth dwarf planet from the Sun and the third dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt.
Makiling f & m Philippine Mythology, Tagalog
Means "uneven, crooked, bent" in Tagalog. In Tagalog mythology, Maria Makiling is a spirit who is said to protect Mount Makiling, a volcano in the Philippines.
Malakas m Philippine Mythology
Means "strong, hard, powerful" in Tagalog. In Philippine mythology, he and Maganda were the first humans. They were said to have sprung from a large bamboo tree pecked by a sarimanok (mythical bird) known as Magaulancealabarca.
Maleen f German, Hunsrik, Folklore
German short form of Magdalene and Hunsrik form of the related name Marlene.... [more]
Malgven f Breton Legend, Celtic Mythology
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of a sorceress or druidess in the Breton legend of Ys. Malgven was the mother of Ahes by King Gradlon (Gralon in Breton).
Malicha f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Malicha (or Malache, or Lamache) was a woman from Lemnos and the mother of Leucophanes by Euphemus.
Malina f Inuit Mythology, Greenlandic
In Inuit mythology, Malina is the name of a solar goddess. She is constantly fleeing from her brother, the moon god Igaluk (Inuit) or Anningan (Grenlandic), and their eternal chase explains the movement of the sun and moon through the sky.
Malio f Polynesian Mythology
Name of a sorceress, sister of the Puna rascal, in Hawaiian Mythology.
Maliya f Near Eastern Mythology
Maliya is the Hittite goddess of gardens, often associated with the horse-god Pirwa and the goddess Kamrušepa... [more]
Malkira m Judeo-Christian Legend
Hebrew: melek ra - lit. "king of evil", "king of the wicked"; or malach ra - "messenger of evil", "angel of iniquity". Identified with Samael.
Mamberi m Georgian Mythology
This is the name of the lord of wolves in Georgian mythology. He was worshiped in Svaneti and other mountainous regions.
Mamers m Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Oscan-Italic form of Mars.
Mami f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "mother" in Babylonian. It is another name for Ninhursag.... [more]
Mammon m Biblical, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "wealth, riches". In the New Testament, this was material wealth or greed, which was often personified as a deity. Sixteenth century German theologian Peter Binsfeld classified him as one of the seven princes of Hell.
Mana m Norse Mythology
This is the word for "moon" in Old Norse, and unlike in Greek and Roman mythology, is a god and not a goddess.
Manaavi f Hinduism
Name : Manaavi मनावी... [more]
Mánagarmr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "moon-hound". This is another name for Hati.
Manas m Kyrgyz, Mythology
Meaning uncertain. It may be derived from Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" or from Alpamysh, the name of a character from an ancient Turkic epic of the same name... [more]
Manat f Near Eastern Mythology
Probably either from Arabic مَنَا (manā) meaning "mete out, distribute" or "test, determine" or مُنِيَة (muniya) meaning "fate, destiny, desire, wish". This was the name of the Semitic goddess of time, fate, fortune and death who was worshipped in pre-Islamic Arabia... [more]
Máni m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse máni "moon". Máni is the personification of the moon in Norse Mythology.
Mania f Etruscan Mythology, Roman Mythology
In Roman and Etruscan mythology, Mania was a goddess of the dead. She, along with Mantus, ruled the underworld. She was said to be the mother of ghosts, the undead, and other spirits of the night, as well as the Lares and the Manes... [more]
Manmohan m Indian, Hinduism
It is another name of Krishna, the Hindu deity. It is a compound of Man and Mohana.
Manovir m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Bengali, Hindi, Nepali, Gujarati, Sinhalese, Tamil, Malayalam, Telugu, Kannada
MEANING - "brave by heart", courageous person, bold. Here मनः means by heart or mind + वीर means brave, courageous, warrior
Manto f Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, but perhaps related to μᾰ́ντῐς (mántis) meaning "seer, prophet".
Mantus m Etruscan Mythology
In Etruscan myth and religion, Mantus was a god of the underworld in the Po Valley as described by Servius.
Manzat f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. Her name is derived from Akkadian manzât "rainbow".1 The fact that her name is Akkadian rather than Elamite, is possibly due to the fact that Elam had repeatedly been under Akkadian rule and was thus influenced by the Akkadian language and culture... [more]
Maponus m Celtic Mythology
Maponus was the god of youth. In Gaulish, mapos means a young boy or son.
March m Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Mark. King March of Cornwall is a famous bearer.
Mardǫll f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from marr ("sea, ocean") and dallr ("luminous, shining"). In Norse mythology this is a name for Freyja.
Margerðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of marr ("sea, lake" or "horse") and garðr ("enclosure, protection"). In Norse mythology this is the name of both a giantess and a sorceress.
Marica f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Marica was a nymph and the mother of Latinus. The sacred forest near Minturnae was dedicated to Marica as well as a nearby lake. The origin and meaning or her name are uncertain... [more]
Marici f Japanese Mythology, Chinese Mythology
Marici is a deva or bodhisattva associated with light and the sun. She is known as Molizhitian (摩利支天) or Molizhitian Pusa (摩利支天菩萨) in China and Marishi-ten (摩利支天?) in Japan and in Tibetan as 'Odzer Canma, "Woman Endowed with Rays of Light" (Wylie: 'od zer can ma)... [more]
Marigorri f Basque Mythology, Basque
Epithet for the moon.... [more]
Mārikoriko f Polynesian Mythology
Means "twilight" in Maori. This is the name of the first woman according to some Maori tribal traditions.
Maris m Etruscan Mythology
Etruscan god often depicted as an infant or child. He was the son of Hercle, the Etruscan equivalent of Heracles.
Marisa f Indian, Hinduism
Said to mean "worthy; respectable" in Sanskrit.... [more]
Marisha f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
" venerable woman"; "respectable lady"... [more]
Marishi f Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism
Venerable woman; Respectable lady
Marj m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Nepali, Hindi
MEANING "cleaner", "purifying ", "one who purifies " , "An epithet for Lord Vishnu "... [more]
Marjan f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi
MEANING - "purification " ," cleaning ", "cleansing", "wiping off" ,"a brush or broom "... [more]
Marjani f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Tamil, Nepali, Telugu, Kannada, Bengali, Malayalam, Punjabi, Gujarati, Indian (Sikh)
MEANING - " purification ", "cleansing", "cleaner ", " broom", Name of a female attendant of Goddess Durga ... [more]
Marpesia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μάρπτω (márptô) "to take hold of, to seize, to catch". This was the name of an Amazonian queen in Greek mythology. A chapter is dedicated to Marpesia and her sister Lampedo in Boccaccio's 'On Famous Women' (1374).
Marpessa f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μάρπτω (márptô) "to take hold of, to seize, to catch" (cf. Marpesia), with the alleged meaning "the robbed one". In Homer's 'Iliad' this name belonged to the wife of the hero Idas... [more]
Marsyas m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Meaning Unknown. Marsyas in Greek myth a satyr known for music and free speech. Also the half-brother of General Antigonus.
Marul m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Nepali, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali, Assamese
MEANING - Soft,Gentle, a kind of duck or flemingo
Marula f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh), Marathi, Nepali, Assamese
MEANING - a kind of duck or flemingo, Soft, Mild, Name of a poetess... [more]
Marzana f Russian, Slavic Mythology, Baltic Mythology
Baltic and Slavic goddess associated with seasonal agrarian rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature, Marzana is often referred to as a goddess of death.... [more]
Mastorava f Mordvin, Mythology
The name of Mordvin Earth goddess. Her name is derived from mastor meaning "earth" and ava meaning "woman, mother".
Matangi f Hinduism
Matangi is one of the Mahavidyas, ten Tantric goddesses and a ferocious aspect of Parvati, the Hindu Divine Mother. She is considered to be the Tantric form of Parvati but she is very similar to Saraswati... [more]
Mathonwy m Welsh Mythology
Mathony is the name of a god or demi-god who was father to the Welsh god/goddess Don ... [more]
Matri f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese, Nepali
"Mother" ;"Divine mother" ;"Goddess Durga ";"Goddess Lakshmi "
Matrika f Hinduism
Name: Matrika मातृका... [more]
Máttaráhkká f Sami, Sami Mythology
Máttaráhkká is the goddess of women and children. She has three daughters: Sáráhkká, Uksáhkká and Juoksáhkká.
Matuta f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin mātūtīnum "morning", this was an epithet of the Roman goddess Aurora.
Max’iell m Jewish Legend
Jewish form of Maxwell
Mayari f & m Philippine Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly from Tagalog mayari meaning "to make, to finish" or may-ari meaning "owner, master". In Tagalog mythology, as well as the mythologies of other Philippine ethnic groups, Mayari is a deity of the moon, night, war, revolution, equality, and strength... [more]
Mayga f Indian, Hinduism
Variant of Indian Hindu name Megha. Means "cloud," "rain cloud," "rain," or "star" in Sanskrit.
Maygha f Indian, Hinduism
Variant of Indian Hindu name Megha. Means "cloud," "rain cloud," "rain," or "star" in Sanskrit.
Mazdak m Persian, Persian Mythology
Mazdak is a name derived from the Zorastrian religion. Aura Mazda was the Fire God, I believe. Mazdak is a great mythological name and is used today in the Farsi language by the Persians/Iranians. It is a name with thousands of years of history.
Mazu f Chinese Mythology
From Chinese 媽祖 (Māzǔ), derived from 妈 (mā) meaning "mother" and 祖 (zǔ) meaning "ancestor, forebear, grandparent". In Chinese mythology Mazu is a sea goddess and the deified form of a medieval Fujianese shamaness who was revered by seafarers and sailors.
Mbombo m African Mythology
Mbombo, a god, also Bakuba god (mbombo) named Bumba, The story of Mbombo's creation tells that in the beginning, Mbombo was alone, darkness and primordial water covered all the earth. It would happen that Mbombo came to feel an intense pain in his stomach, and then Mbombo vomited the sun, the moon, and stars... [more]
Meander m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant spelling of Maeander, which is the latinized form of Μαίανδρος (Maiandros). The latter is the Greek name for a river that is nowadays known as the Büyük Menderes river, which is located in southwestern Turkey... [more]
Medeina f Baltic Mythology, Lithuanian
Lithuanian goddess of the forest and the hunt, her name deriving from either Lithuanian medis "tree; wood" or Lithuanian medė "forest".... [more]
Medesicaste f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, the name Medesicaste refers to two women of the Trojan royal house. And it means "the one that differs in wisdom".
Meditrina f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of wine and health, possibly created to explain the Roman holiday of Meditrinalia (Oct. 11); generally taken to mean 'healer'
Medon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun μέδων (medon) meaning "ruler", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb μέδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over".... [more]
Meduna f Celtic Mythology
Meduna was a Celtic goddess known from an inscription in Bad Bertrich, Germany, where she was worshipped together with Vercana. The origin and meaning of her name are uncertain: theories include a derivation from Gaulish medu- "mead", which gave rise to the speculation that she may have been a goddes of honey-wine.
Medus m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology he was son of Medea and Aegeus.... [more]
Meedhu m Hinduism
MEANING : riches, wealth, prize... [more]
Meedhush m Hinduism
MEANING : bountiful, liberal, Name of a son of lord Indra by Paulomi ... [more]
Meenu f Hinduism
Girl with Fish Eyes or Fish that navigates through easily anywhere and there is peace and happiness around
Mefitis f Roman Mythology
Mefitis was a Samnite and minor Roman goddess of noxious gases, like those from volcanoes or swamps. Mefitis also gives her name to the archaic word "mephitic" meaning foul smelling.
Megacles m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Megakles. This name was borne by two eponymous archons of Athens, the earliest of which lived in the 9th century BC.
Meganeira f Greek Mythology
Derived from μέγᾰς (mégas) meaning "big, large, great" and potentially ανηρ (aner) meaning "man".
Megapenthes m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "great sorrow".
Megara f Greek Mythology, Popular Culture
Either a variant of Megaera or derived from either the Ancient Greek city Megara in West Attica, Greece, or the Ancient Greek colony in Sicily Megara Hyblaea, both derived from megaron, from megas 'large, great, marvelous', referring to a large hall.... [more]
Megareus m Greek Mythology
Likely derived from Megara.... [more]
Megisto f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Variant of Megiste, which is the main feminine form of Megistos. This was the name of the leader of the women's resistance against the tyrant Aristotimus of Elis (c... [more]
Melaine f English (Rare), Greek Mythology
Etymologically, Melaine shares her roots with Melanie.... [more]
Melampus m Greek Mythology
In the Greek myths Melampus was the cousin of Bellerophon and won glory and fame all because he was kind to animals. One day when he was a boy he saw some orphaned baby snakes by the side of the road... [more]
Melaneus m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελανέω (melaneō) meaning "to grow black, to become black", which is ultimately derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark" (see Melanie)... [more]
Melanippe f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Melanippos. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology.
Melanippos m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Greek adjective μελανός (melanos) meaning "black, dark", which is the genitive form of the Greek adjective μέλας (melas) meaning "black, dark"... [more]
Melanippus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Melanippos. This name is borne by several characters in Greek mythology.
Melantho f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελανθης (melanthes) "black". This is the name of several minor figures in Greek mythology. It also occurs in Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' belonging to the favourite maid of Penelope, who is described as "sharp-tongued", and is later hanged alongside the other maids who had lain with Penelope's suitors; she is the sister of Melanthios, an insolent goatherd killed by Odysseus.
Melanthos m Greek Mythology
Means "black flower", derived from Greek μελας (melas) meaning "black" combined with Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". Also compare Melanthios.
Melanthus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Melanthos. In Greek mythology, Melanthus was a king of Messenia who was later expelled from Messenia and instead became king of Athens.
Mel-dela f Caucasian Mythology
This was the name of the supreme goddess in Vainakh mythology.
Meleager m Ancient Greek (Latinized), History, Greek Mythology
Latinized form of Meleagros. In history, this was the name of a king from the Ptolemaic Dynasty of ancient Egypt. In Greek mythology, this was the name of a hero who was the host of the Calydonian boar hunt.
Meler-yerdi m Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Meler-Yerdi was the god of plants and cereal beverages in Vainakh mythology.
Meliboea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Derived from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey" and βοάω (boaô) "to shout, to proclaim" (when used of the wind, "to roar" and "to howl"; cf... [more]
Meline f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Meline is the daughter of Thespius and Megamede. She bore Heracles a son, Laomedon.
Melinoe f Greek Mythology
Name of a minor figure in Greek mythology, spelled Μηλινοη (Mêlinoê) or Μειλινοη (Meilinoê), possibly derived from Greek μήλινος (mêlinos) "of a quince-yellow, having the colour of quince", quince being a type of fruit, the yellowish-green colour of which allegedly "evoked the pallor of illness or death for the Greeks." If originally spelled Meilinoe, it may be derived from Greek μείλια (meilia) "propitiations, offerings to the dead".... [more]
Melisseus m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελισσεύς (melisseus) meaning "bee-keeper, bee-man", which is ultimately derived from Greek μέλισσα (melissa) meaning "honey-bee" (also see Melissa)... [more]
Mellona f Roman Mythology, English (American, Rare, Archaic)
Mellona was an Ancient Roman goddess associated with the supply of honey. The name contains the latin word mel "honey".
Mena f Hinduism
Mena is the daughter of Meru, the wife of Himavat and mother to Parvati, Ganga and Mainaka.
Mena f Roman Mythology
Along with Juno, assured menstrual flow, and during pregnancy redirected its flow to feed the developing child.
Menaka f Indian, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Tamil
Means "celestial damsel" in Hindi.
Menemachus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Menemachos. This name was borne by a Greek physician from the 2nd century AD.
Menephron m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Greek verb μενω (meno) meaning "to stay, to remain" as well as "to last, to withstand" (see Menelaus)... [more]
Meneptolemos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective μενεπτόλεμος (meneptolemos) meaning "staunch in battle, steadfast", which consists of the Greek verb μένω (meno) meaning "to stay, to remain" as well as "to last, to withstand" combined with the Epic Greek noun πτόλεμος (ptolemos) meaning "war".... [more]
Meneptolemus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Meneptolemos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the suitors of Penelope.
Menestheus m Greek Mythology
Derived from μένω (ménō) meaning “to stay” and θεός (theós) meaning "divine".
Menglǫð f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "one who takes pleasure in jewels". In Norse mythology Menglǫð is a maiden who lives in Lyjaberg.
Menhit f Egyptian Mythology, African Mythology
Means "(she who) massacres". ... [more]
Menippe f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Menippos. This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology, one of whom was a daughter of Orion.
Menippus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Menippos. This name was borne by an ancient Greek Cynic philosopher from the 3rd century BC.
Menja f Norse Mythology
The name of an enslaved giant and sister of Fenja in 'Grottasöngr'.
Menoeceus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "strength of the house".
Menoetius m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "doomed might".
Ménrót m Hungarian Mythology
Ménrót is mentioned in Simon of Kéza's 'Gesta Hunnorum et Hungarorum', written in the 1280s, in its semi-Latinized form Menrot. According to Simon of Kéza, Hunor and Magor, the legendary forefathers of the Huns and the Hungarians, were the sons of Ménrót, a mythical giant, who he partly identified with biblical Nimrod... [more]
Menrva f Etruscan Mythology
Menrva was an Etruscan goddess of war, art, wisdom, and medicine. She contributed much of her character to Roman Minerva, when that culture evolved. She was the child of Uni and Tinia... [more]
Mens m Roman Mythology
Meaing, "mind" he was the god who provides a child with its intelligence.
Mephistopheles m Literature, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Hebrew mephitz "destroyer" and tophel "liar" (the second element taken from the phrase tophel shequer, literally "falsehood plasterer"). This is the name of the devil in the German Faust legend, with whom the character Faust makes a pact, exchanging his soul for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures.
Meret f Egyptian Mythology
Means "the beloved". ... [more]
Meretseger f Egyptian Mythology, Ancient Egyptian
Means "She who loves silence." ... [more]
Merewenne f Medieval Cornish, Celtic Mythology
Merewenne is listed in the 12th-century Hartland list as one of the daughters of Brychan. While she is sometimes considered identical with Morwenna of Morwenstowe, another daughter of Brychan, Merewenne and the variants Marwyne and Merwenna appear in medieval records referring to the patron-saint of Marhamchurch near Bude (a church dating back to 1086 which is situated in north-east Cornwall).
Mergen m Mythology, Tuvan, Kalmyk, Buryat, Kazakh
Derived from Mongolian мэргэн (mergen) meaning "sharpshooter, archer" or "wise, intelligent". In Turkic mythology, Mergen is a deity of abundance and wisdom.
Meriadeg m Breton, Breton Legend
From an old Breton name composed of the elements mer "sea" and iatoc "forehead". Conan Meriadeg was the legendary founder of Brittany.
Merops m Greek Mythology
From Greek μέροψ (merops) meaning "bee-eater", the bee-eater (species Merops apiaster) being a type of bird; allegedly it was used to mean "mortal". This word can mean "with face turned", derived from Greek μέρος (meros) "part" and ὤψ (ôps) "eye, face".
Merzhin m Breton Legend
Breton variant of Merlin.
Mesembria f Greek Mythology
Mesembria is the name of the of the Greek Horae, goddesses of the hours. Her name means "midday", or "noon".
Mesha f & m Indian, Hinduism
EAST INDIAN INDIA... [more]
Meskhenet f Egyptian Mythology
In Egyptian mythology she was a goddess of childbirth, and the creator of each child's 'ka', a part of their soul, which she breathed into them at the moment of their birth. Because she was responsible for 'ka', she was also associated with fate, and so would sometimes be associated with Shai... [more]
Mestor m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun μήστωρ (mestor) meaning "adviser, counsellor". In Greek mythology, this was the name of several princes.
Mestra f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Mestra was a daughter of Erysichthon of Thessaly. According to Ovid's "Metamorphoses," she was granted the ability to change her shape at will by her lover, Poseidon. Mestra used her shape-shifting ability and trickery to provide her father with nourishment after he had been cursed with an insatiable appetite by Demeter... [more]
Metanira f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Metanirapronunciation? (Ancient Greek: , Metaneira or Metaenira; also Meganeira1) was a queen of Eleusis and wife of Celeus... [more]
Metatron m Judeo-Christian Legend
After the angel of the face, the angel of the presence, chief of the ministering angels, the chief recording angel, chancellor of heaven, the angel by whom the world is maintained, and a being so mighty that he possesses 72 other names... [more]
Methone f Greek Mythology
One of the Alkyonides.
Metioche f Greek Mythology
Metioche, a daughter of Orion, see Menippe and Metioche... [more]
Michpa m Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Michpa was the Georgian patron god of cattle and other domestic animals who was worshiped in Svaneti in the winter.
Mictēcacihuātl f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Mictlan, the Aztec afterlife, and Nahuatl cihuātl meaning "woman, lady". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of the dead and the underworld.
Midhu m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil
MEANING : riches, wealth, prize... [more]
Midhush m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali, Sinhalese, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese
MEANING : bountiful, liberal, Name of a son of lord Indra by Paulomi... [more]
Midhushi f Hinduism
MEANING : liberal, bountiful, bestowing richly, name of goddess Durga or Lakshmi, name of a goddess ( who was wife of Ishaan / ईशान ) ... [more]
Midhushtam m Hinduism
MEANING : most bountiful or liberal (applied to gods), the sun... [more]
Midhushtama f Hinduism
MEANING : most bountiful or liberal. It is feminine of Midhushtam... [more]
Midir m Irish Mythology
Meaning uncertain. In early Irish literature he was the sídhe lover of Étaín.
Mignolina f Folklore
The other Italian name form Thumbelina
Miha f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali, Bengali
"Downpour of water"; "mist "... [more]
Mihrimah f Persian, Persian Mythology, Ottoman Turkish, Turkish, Urdu
Means "sun and moon" in Farsi from the word مهر (mehr) meaning "sun" and ماه (mah) meaning "moon".... [more]
Mikelats m Basque Mythology
Servant and pupil of Etsai.
Mikha'iil m Judeo-Christian Legend
Arabic, biblical equivalent for the name Michael used in Quran.
Mikolt f Hungarian, Medieval Hungarian, Hungarian Mythology
Old Hungarian name of uncertain origin and meaning; theories include a derivation from Mikál (via the variant Mikol) and a derivation from Nikola... [more]
Milad m Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Mithridates. This is the name of a hero in the epic Shahnameh.
Milcom m Biblical, Near Eastern Mythology, English (Puritan)
In the Old Testament, Milcom was the highest of the Ammonite gods. It is generally accepted that this name is a form of the common Semitic noun meaning "king" (Hebrew melek), and became an epithet of the head of the Ammonite pantheon... [more]
Mime m Germanic Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Richard Wagner's The Ring opera cycle, Mime is the brother of Alberich and the maker of the magic helmet Tarnhelm.
Mímir m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse mímir "memory", which is related to Old English gemimor "well-known", modern Dutch mijmeren "to muse, to ponder" and Latin memor "mindful, remembering." In Norse mythology, Mímir was a god who had omniscient wisdom and knowledge and who was keeper of the Well of Wisdom in Jotunheim (the world of the Giants).
Mindia m Georgian, Folklore, Literature
Basically means "I wanted you", derived from Georgian მინდია (mindia) or მინდოდა (mindoda) meaning "I wanted". This name literally refers to the fact that the child in question was desired by its parents.... [more]
Mindort-batoni m Georgian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Mindort-Batoni was the god of valleys, fields, and wild flowers in Georgian mythology. He is also the father of Mindort-brdzanebeli, the goddess of flowers.
Mindort-brdzanebeli f Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Mindort-Brdzanebeli was the Georgian goddess of flowers and daughter of Mindort-batoni. She was believed to flutter over plants and live off of pollen.
Miniver f Cornish, Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Anglicized form of Menfre, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Menfre, born c.471, was one of the many holy daughters of King Brychan Brycheiniog. 'St. Menfre appears to have been active in Wales, around Minwear, near Haverfordwest, in Dyfed but, later, left her native land in order to evangelise the Cornish.' The early use of the name was in Cornwall where it appears to be a regional form of Guinevere... [more]
Minthe f Greek Mythology
Means "mint" in Greek. In Greek mythology Minthe was a nymph was was transformed into an herb by Persephone after attempting to seduce Hades.
Mirliflor m Folklore
Derived from French mirliflore meaning "dandy". This is the name of a prince in the fairy tale 'Rosanella'. He is known for his inconstancy.