Ancient Celtic Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Ancient Celtic.
There are 554 names matching your criteria.

ADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
ÁED   m   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODH.
ÁEDÁN   m   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.
ÁEDH   m   Ancient Irish
Variant of ÁED.
AENGUS   m   Irish
Variant of AONGHUS.
AERON (2)   f & m   Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of AGRONA. In Welsh mythology Aeron was often portrayed as a masculine deity.
AGRONA   f   Celtic Mythology
Derived from the old Celtic element agro meaning "battle, slaughter". This was the name of the Brythonic goddess of war and death.
AIDAN   m   Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIDEEN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ÉTAÍN.
AIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AILILL   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish Gaelic. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of queen Medb.
ANDRASTE   f   Celtic Mythology
Possibly means "invincible" in Celtic. This was the name of a Briton goddess of victory who was invoked by Boudicca before her revolt.
ANGHARAD   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
ANGUS   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
AODH   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings... [more]
AODHAGÁN   m   Irish, Scottish
Diminutive of AODH.
AODHÁN   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century... [more]
AOIBHE   f   Irish
Variant of AOIFE.
AOIFE   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "beauty" from the Gaelic word aoibh. In Irish legend Aoife was a warrior princess. In war against her sister Scathach, she was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn... [more]
AONGHAS   m   Scottish
Scottish variant of AONGHUS.
AONGHUS   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly meaning "one strength" derived from Irish óen "one" and gus "force, strength, energy". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was the Irish god of love and youth... [more]
ARAWN   m   Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the god of the underworld, called Annwfn, in Welsh mythology.
ARIANRHOD   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes... [more]
ARIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ERIN.
ARMEL   m   French
From the old Welsh name Arthfael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARMELLE   f   French
Feminine form of ARMEL.
ART   m   English
Short form of ARTHUR.
ARTAIR   m   Scottish
Scottish form of ARTHUR.
ARTHFAEL   m   Ancient Celtic
Welsh form of ARMEL.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king"... [more]
ARTO   m   Finnish
Finnish short form of ARTHUR.
ARTTU   m   Finnish
Finnish short form of ARTHUR.
ARTTURI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of ARTHUR.
ARTÚR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of ARTHUR.
ARTŪRAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ARTHUR.
ARTURO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ARTHUR.
ARTŪRS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of ARTHUR.
AYDAN (2)   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
BÉBHINN   f   Irish
Modern spelling of BÉBINN.
BÉBHIONN   f   Irish
Variant of BÉBINN.
BÉBINN   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fair lady" in Irish Gaelic. This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including a goddess of childbirth.
BEDELIA   f   Irish
Irish diminutive of BRIDGET.
BEDIVERE   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Bedwyr, which is of unknown meaning. In Arthurian legends Bedivere was one of the original companions of King Arthur... [more]
BEE   f   English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BÉIBHINN   f   Irish
Modern form of BÉBINN.
BELENOS   m   Celtic Mythology
Variant of BELENUS.
BELENUS   m   Celtic Mythology
Probably from a Celtic word meaning "bright, brilliant". This was the name of a Gaulish solar god who was often equated with Apollo.
BELI   m   Welsh Mythology
Probably a Welsh derivative of BELENUS. Beli Mawr was a Welsh ancestor deity who established several royal lines in Wales.
BERIT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of BIRGIT.
BEVIN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BÉBINN.
BIDDY   f   Irish, English
Diminutive of BRIDGET.
BIDELIA   f   Irish
Diminutive of BRIDGET.
BILE   m   Irish Mythology
Possibly an Irish form of BELENUS, though it may derive from an Irish word meaning "hero". In Irish mythology this was the name of one of the Milesians who was drowned while invading Ireland.
BIRGIT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
BIRGITTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER... [more]
BIRGITTE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of BIRGITTA.
BIRITA   f   Faroese
Faroese form of BRIDGET.
BIRTE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BIRTHE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BLAANID   f   Manx
Manx form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁITHÍN   f   Irish
Variant of BLÁTHNAT using a different diminutive suffix.
BLANID   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁTHNAID   f   Irish
Variant of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁTHNAT   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí... [more]
BLODEUWEDD   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. In a story in the Mabinogion, she is created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes... [more]
BOADICEA   f   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of BOUDICCA.
BOUDICCA   f   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide.
BRADÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic meaning "salmon".
BRADEN   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRAEDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BRAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BRÂN   m   Welsh Mythology
Variant of BRAN (2).
BRAN (1)   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2)   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANDEN   m   English
Variant of BRANDON.
BRANDON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
BRANNON   m   English
From an Irish surname derived from Mac Branain, which means "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BRANWEN   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BREANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRÉANAINN   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish form of BRENDAN.
BREANDÁN   m   Irish
Irish Gaelic form of BRENDAN.
BREANN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BREANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BREANNE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BREDA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BREESHEY   f   Manx
Manx form of BRIDGET.
BRENDA   f   English
Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.
BRENDAN   m   Irish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENDANUS   m   Irish (Latinized)
Latinized form of Bréanainn (see BRENDAN).
BRENDEN   m   English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENDON   m   English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENNA   f   English
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.
BRENNAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRENNUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRENO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
BRET   m   English
Variant of BRETT.
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAN   m   Irish, English, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble"... [more]
BRIANA   f   English
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in 'The Faerie Queene' (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANNE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRICE   m   French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRICIUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latin form of BRICE, probably ultimately of Gaulish origin.
BRÍD   f   Irish
Contracted form of BRIGHID.
BRIDE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BRIDGET   f   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda... [more]
BRIDGETTE   f   English
Variant of BRIDGET.
BRIDIE   f   Irish
Anglicized diminutive of BRÍD.
BRIGHID   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGID   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of BRIGHID.
BRÍGIDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIDA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIT   f   Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Latvian
Slovene, Croatian and Latvian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTA   f   German, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTE   f   German, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BRION   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRIT   f   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BRITANNIA   f   English (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTANY   f   English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons... [more]
BRITTNY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITTON   m   English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BRYAN   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRYANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYCE   m   English
Variant of BRICE.
BRYGIDA   f   Polish
Polish form of BRIDGET.
BRYON   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BYRNE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
CADEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CÁEL   m   Irish Mythology
From Gaelic caol "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CAILEAN   m   Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAISIDE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
CAOIMHE   f   Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CAOMH   m   Ancient Irish
Masculine form of CAOIMHE.
CAOMHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Diminutive of CAOMH. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CARADOC   m   Welsh
Variant of CARADOG.
CARADOG   m   Welsh
Welsh form of CARATACOS. This is the name of several figures in Welsh history and legend, including a 6th-century king of Gwent and a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian romance.
CARATACOS   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from the Celtic element car meaning "love". This was the name of a 1st-century British chieftain who rebelled against Roman rule.
CARLISLE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS"... [more]
CARLYLE   m   English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARRAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of CORRAIDHÍN".
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers... [more]
CASS   f & m   English
Short form of CASSANDRA, CASSIDY, and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CASSIE   f   English
Diminutive of CASSANDRA and other names beginning with Cass.
CATHASACH   m   Ancient Irish
Means "vigilant" in Irish.
CAVAN   m   English
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CEDRIC   m   English
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century... [more]
CÉIBHFHIONN   f   Irish Mythology
Means "fair locks" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of an Irish goddess of inspiration.
CERDIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Earlier form of CEDRIC, possibly of Brythonic origin.
CERNUNNOS   m   Celtic Mythology (Latinized)
Means "horned" in Celtic. This was the name of the Celtic god fertility, animals, wealth, and the underworld. He was usually depicted having antlers, and was identified with the Roman god Mercury.
CIAN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "ancient" in Gaelic. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CIANÁN   m   Irish
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
CIANNAIT   f   Irish
Feminine form of CIAN.
CLEENA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of CLÍODHNA.
CLÍDNA   f   Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of CLÍODHNA.
CLÍODHNA   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "shapely" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a beautiful goddess. She fell in love with a mortal named Ciabhan and left the Land of Promise with him, but when she arrived on the other shore she was swept to sea by a great wave.
CLÍONA   f   Irish
Variant of CLÍODHNA.
CODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COILEAN   m   Irish
Irish form of CAILEAN.
COLIN (1)   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
CONALL   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CONCHOBHAR   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Original Irish form of CONOR.
CONCHÚR   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of CONCHOBHAR.
CONLAOCH   m   Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Gaelic conn "chief" and flaith "lord". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including a son of Cúchulainn who was accidentally killed by his father.
CONNELL   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill meaning "descendant of CONALL".
CONNER   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONNLA   m   Irish Mythology
Variant of CONLAOCH.
CONNOR   m   Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONOR   m   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings... [more]
CORRAIDHÍN   m   Ancient Irish
Means "little spear", derived from Irish corradh "spear" and a diminutive suffix.
COTY   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
CÚCHULAINN   m   Irish Mythology
Means "hound of Culann" in Irish. This was the usual name of the warrior hero who was named Sétanta at birth, given to him because he took the place of one of Culann's hounds after he accidentally killed it... [more]
CUIDIGHTHEACH   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "helpful".
CULHWCH   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "hiding place of the pig" in Welsh. In Welsh legend he was the lover of Olwen the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden... [more]
CULLEN   m   English
From a surname, either CULLEN (1) or CULLEN (2).
CUNOBELINUS   m   Ancient Celtic
Possibly means "hound of Belenus" from the old Celtic element koun "hound" combined with the name of the god BELENUS... [more]
CYMBELINE   m   Literature
Form of CUNOBELINUS used by Shakespeare in his play 'Cymbeline' (1609).
CYNBEL   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh cyn "chief" and bel "war".
CYNWRIG   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh cyn meaning "chief" and gwr meaning "hero, man", plus the suffix -ig indicating "has the quality of".
DAGDA   m   Irish Mythology
Means "good god" in Celtic. In Irish myth Dagda (called also The Dagda) was the powerful god of the earth, knowledge, magic, abundance and treaties, a leader of the Tuatha De Danann... [more]
DÁIRE   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish Gaelic. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.
DAIREANN   f   Irish Mythology
Variant of DOIREANN.
DARA (1)   m   Irish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARACH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARRAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DEIDRA   f   English
Variant of DEIRDRE.
DEIDRE   f   English
Variant of DEIRDRE.
DEIRDRE   f   English, Irish, Irish Mythology
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise... [more]
DEITRA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of DEIRDRE.
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DELIA (2)   f   English
Short form of ADELIA or BEDELIA.
DELMA   f   Irish, English
Short form of FIDELMA.
DERDRIU   f   Irish Mythology
Older form of DEIRDRE.
DERMID   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of DIARMAD.
DERMOT   m   Irish
Anglicized form of DIARMAID.
DERRY   m   Irish
Diminutive of DERMOT.
DIARMAD   m   Scottish
Scottish form of DIARMAID.
DIARMAID   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne... [more]
DILLAN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of DYLAN.
DILLON   m   English
Variant of DYLAN based on the spelling of the surname Dillon, which has an unrelated origin.
DOIREANN   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "sullen, tempestuous" in Irish. This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a daughter of Bodb Derg who poisoned Fionn mac Cumhail.
DOIREND   f   Irish Mythology
Variant of DOIREANN.
DONNDUBHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Composed of the Gaelic element donn "brown" combined with dubh "dark" and a diminutive suffix.
DONOVAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".
DREST   m   Ancient Celtic
Variant of DRUST.
DRUST   m   Ancient Celtic
Pictish name probably derived from Celtic drest meaning "riot" or "tumult". This name was borne by several kings of the Picts, including their last king Drust X, who ruled in the 9th century.
DRUSTAN   m   Ancient Celtic
Older form of TRISTAN. This name was borne by a 7th-century Scottish saint.
DRYSTAN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of TRISTAN.
DUBHSHLÁINE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Gaelic name of the River Slaney.
DUBHTHACH   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
DWYN   m   Celtic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Celtic god of love.
DYLAN   m   Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy "great" and llanw "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon... [more]
EADAN   f   Irish
Modern form of ÉTAÍN.
ÉADAOIN   f   Irish
Modern form of ÉTAÍN.
ÉBER   m   Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of ÉIBHEAR.
EDAN   m   Irish, Scottish
Variant of AIDAN.
EDANA   f   History
Latinized form of ÉTAÍN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
ÉIBHEAR   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Irish legend this name belonged to two of the sons of Míl, Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn, the first of the Gaels to conquer Ireland.
ÉIBHIR   m   Irish
Variant of ÉIBHEAR.
EIGYR   f   Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of IGRAINE.
EIMEAR   f   Irish
Variant of ÉIMHEAR.
ÉIMHEAR   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of EMER.
EIMHIR   f   Scottish
Scottish form of EMER.
EIREANN   f   English (Rare), Irish (Rare)
From Éireann, the genitive case of Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
ELISEDD   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
ELLIS (2)   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of ELISEDD.
EMER   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Gaelic eimh "swift". In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.
ENID   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
EPONA   f   Celtic Mythology
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ERIN   f   English, Irish
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
ÉRIU   f   Irish Mythology
From the name of an Irish goddess, who according to legend gave her name to Ireland (which is called Éire in Irish). In reality, the goddess probably got her name from that of the island, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
ERYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERIN.
ÉTAÍN   f   Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét "jealousy". In Irish mythology she was a sun and horse goddess who was the lover of Midir.
FACHTNA   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "hostile" in Irish Gaelic. He was the husband of Neasa in Irish legend. Some versions of the legends also have him as the father of Conchobhar.
FÁELÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Older form of FAOLÁN.
FAOLÁN   m   Irish
Means "little wolf", derived from Gaelic fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
FEARGHAS   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Gaelic elements fear "man" and gus "vigour". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the Ulster hero Fearghas mac Róich.
FEDELM   f   Irish Mythology
Variant of FEIDELM.
FEDELMA   f   Irish
Latinized form of FEIDELM.
FEIDELM   f   Irish Mythology
Possibly a feminine form of FEIDLIMID. This name is borne by several women in Irish legend including Feidelm Noíchrothach, a daughter of Conchobhar the king of Ulster.
FEIDHELM   f   Irish
Variant of FEIDELM.
FEIDHLIM   m   Irish
Variant of FEIDLIMID.
FEIDHLIMIDH   m   Irish
Variant of FEIDLIMID.
FEIDLIMID   m & f   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of three early kings of Munster.
FELIM   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FEIDHLIM.
FENELLA   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FERGIE   m & f   Scottish
Diminutive and feminine form of FERGUS.
FERGUS   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of FEARGHAS.
FFRAID   f   Welsh
Welsh form of BRIDGET.
FIACHRA   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years... [more]
FIACRE   m   French
French form of FIACHRA.
FIDELMA   f   Irish
Latinized form of FEIDELM. Saint Fidelma and her sister Saint Eithne were 5th-century followers of Saint Patrick.
FILLIN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.
FINELLA   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FINN (1)   m   Irish Mythology, Irish
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
FINNAGÁN   m   Irish
Diminutive of FIONN.
FINNÁN   m   Irish
Older form of FIONNÁN.
FINNEGAN   m   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN... [more]
FINNGUALA   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of FIONNUALA.
FINOLA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FINTAN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FION   m   Irish
Variant of FIONN.
FIONA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FIONN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon... [more]
FIONNÁN   m   Irish
Diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
FIONNTAN   m   Irish, Scottish
Modern Irish form of FINTAN.
FIONNUALA   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
FIONOLA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
GAENOR   f   Welsh
Welsh variant of GAYNOR.
GALCHOBHAR   m   Ancient Irish
Means "foreign help" in Irish.
GAVIN   m   English, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GAWAIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend... [more]
GAYNOR   f   English (British)
Medieval form of GUINEVERE.
GENEVRA   f   Various
Variant of GINEVRA.


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