Names Categorized "dog names"

This is a list of names in which the categories include dog names.
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ACE (1) m English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
ANGUS m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ARCHIE m Scottish, English
Diminutive of ARCHIBALD. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.
BAILEY m & f English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BAMBI f English
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel 'Bambi' (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
BEAUREGARD m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
BELLA f English
Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".
BENJI m English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.
BUDDY m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BUSTER m English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust, a dialectal variant of burst. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
CANDY f English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CHARLIE m & f English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHICA f Portuguese
Diminutive of FRANCISCA.
CHICHI f Western African, Igbo
Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning "God".
CHICO m Portuguese
Diminutive of FRANCISCO.
COOPER m English
From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.
DAISY f English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
FIDO m Pet
Means "I am faithful" in Latin. This name is commonly given to dogs.
FIFI f French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
FINLEY m & f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
GINGER f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GORDIE m English
Diminutive of GORDON. A famous bearer was Canadian hockey star Gordie Howe (1928-2016).
GRACIE f English
Diminutive of GRACE.
HAPPY f & m English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
LUCKY m & f English, Indian, Hindi
From a nickname given to a lucky person. It is also sometimes used as a diminutive of LUKE.
LUNA f Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
MACY f English
From an English surname that was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius. This is the name of a chain of American department stores founded by Rowland Hussey Macy (1822-1877).
MARLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARMADUKE m English (British, Rare)
Possibly derived from the Old Irish name MÁEL MÁEDÓC. This name has been traditionally used in the Yorkshire area of Britain.
MAX m German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Russian
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Макс (see MAKS).
MILO m English, Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.
MOLLY f English
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
OLIVER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OTIS m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of OTTO. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).
OTTO m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
PARKER m & f English
From an English occupational surname that meant "keeper of the park".
PENNY f English
Diminutive of PENELOPE.
PERCY m English
From an English surname that was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name that was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PERDITA f Literature
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).
PIPPIN (1) m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of PÉPIN.
POLLY f English
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
POSY f English
Diminutive of JOSEPHINE. It can also be inspired by the English word posy for a bunch of flowers.
PRINCE m English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
PRINCESS f English (Modern)
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
RANDY m & f English
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
REX m English
From Latin rex "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
RILEY m & f English
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROBIN m & f English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROCKY m English
Diminutive of ROCCO and other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie 'Rocky' (1976) and its five sequels.
ROSCOE m English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, itself derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
RUFUS m Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen meaning "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RUSSELL m English
From a surname meaning "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.
RUSTY m English
From a nickname that was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
SCOUT f English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
SPIKE m English (Rare)
From a nickname that may have originally been given to a person with spiky hair.
STEVE m English
Short form of STEVEN. A notable bearer was American technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011).
TITO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of TITUS.
TOBY m & f English
Medieval form of TOBIAS. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
TRIXIE f English
Diminutive of BEATRIX.
ZEUS m Greek Mythology
The name of a Greek god, related to the old Indo-European god *Dyeus, from a root meaning "shine" or "sky". In Greek mythology he was the highest of the gods. After he and his siblings defeated the Titans, Zeus ruled over the earth and humankind from atop Mount Olympus. He had control over the weather and his weapon was a thunderbolt.