Ruta Graveolens's Personal Name List

ABNER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְנֵר (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AB-nər (English)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. It has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. It was popular with the Puritans, who brought it to America in the 17th century.

ACE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AYS

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ALVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-vin

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.

ANDROMEDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ανδρομεδη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: an-DRAW-mə-də (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Means "to think of a man" from the Greek element ανδρος (andros) "of a man" combined with μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to be mindful of". Andromeda is a constellation in the northern sky, which gets its name from a mythical Greek princess who was rescued from sacrifice by Perseus. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.

ANITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish

Pronounced: ah-NEE-tah (Spanish)

Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ATHENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

AUGUSTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ow-GUWS-tah (German, Polish), ow-GOOS-tah (Italian), ə-GUS-tə (English)

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.

AVA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AY-və

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).

AXELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ak-SEL

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of AXEL

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Rating: 76% based on 5 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BESSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BES-ee

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of ELIZABETH

BETHSAIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

From Bethseda, a Biblical place name derived from Hebrew/Aramaic beth-tsaida which means "house of fishing".

BETTY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BET-ee

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of ELIZABETH

BEULAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: בְּעוּלָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BYOO-lə (English)

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.

BILL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BIL

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Short form of WILLIAM. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name.

BLANCHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: BLAWNSH (French), BLANCH (English)

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.

BRENDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BREN-də

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.

BUD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BUD

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Short form of BUDDY

CATHRYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KATH-rin

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Variant of KATHERINE

CÉCILE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch

Pronounced: say-SEEL (French)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

French form of CECILIA

CELESTE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Italian, English

Pronounced: che-LE-ste (Italian), sə-LEST (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.

CELESTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SEL-əs-teen

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.

CERISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Means "cherry" in French.

CHET

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: CHET

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Short form of CHESTER

CLEO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KLEE-o

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Short form of CLEOPATRA

CRESCENTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Late Roman

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of CRESCENTIUS

DEIRDRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: DEER-drə (English), DEER-dree (English), DER-dre (Irish)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' 'Deirdre' (1907) and J. M. Synge's 'Deirdre of the Sorrows' (1910).

DENVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEN-vər

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).

DIXIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DIK-see

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

From the term that refers to the southern United States, used by Daniel D. Emmett in his song Dixie in 1859. The term may be derived from French dix "ten", which was printed on ten-dollar bills issued from a New Orleans bank.

DREDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Short form of ETHELDREDA

DRUSILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: droo-SIL-ə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.

DUFF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: DUF

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Derived from Gaelic dubh meaning "dark".

DUSTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DUS-tin

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN). The name was popularized by the actor Dustin Hoffman (1937-), who was apparently named after the earlier silent movie star Dustin Farnum (1874-1929).

EARL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: URL

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

ED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: ED (English), ET (Dutch)

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.

ELUNED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 26% based on 5 votes

Derived from Welsh eilun "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.

ERNEST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Slovene, Polish

Pronounced: UR-nəst (English)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).

ERNESTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, English

Pronounced: er-nes-TEE-nə (German), UR-nəs-teen (English)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of ERNEST

ESTELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: es-TEL

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

ETHEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ETH-əl

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels 'The Newcomes' (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and 'The Daisy Chain' (1856) by C. M. Yonge.

EUDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ευδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: yoo-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements ευ "good" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.

EUGENE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: YOO-jeen, yoo-JEEN

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευγενιος (Eugenios) which was derived from the Greek word ευγενης (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements ευ "good, well" and γενης (genes) "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.

This name was not particularly common in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. It became more popular in part due to the fame of Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736), a French-born general who served the Austrian Empire. A notable bearer was the American playwright Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953).

EUGÉNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-zhay-NEE

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.

EUNICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ευνικη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: YOO-nis (English)

Latinized form of the Greek name Ευνικη (Eunike) which meant "good victory". The New Testament mentions her as the mother of Timothy. As an English name, it was first used after the Protestant Reformation.

EUPHRASIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-fra-ZEE

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

French form of EUPHRASIA

EVERETTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EV-ə-rit, ev-ə-RET

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Variant of EVERETT

EVVIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EE-vee, EV-ee

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN

FINOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Rating: 20% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of FIONNUALA

FRANK (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, French

Pronounced: FRANGK (English), FRAHNK (German, Dutch), FRAWNK (French)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. The name was brought to England by the Normans. Notable bearers include author L. Frank Baum (1856-1919), architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), and singer Frank Sinatra (1915-1998).

GALINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Галина (Russian, Bulgarian)

Pronounced: gah-LEE-nah (Russian)

Russian and Bulgarian feminine form of Galenos (see GALEN).

GARY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GER-ee, GAR-ee

From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.

GENEVIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEN-ə-veev

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

English form of GENEVIÈVE

GEORGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GERTRUDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: GUR-trood (English), ger-TROO-də (German), khər-TRUY-də (Dutch)

Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and þruþ "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).

GINNIFER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GIN-ni-fər

A variant of [Jennifer], originating from [Guinevere].

GRACIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAY-see

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of GRACE

GRISELDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature

Pronounced: gri-ZEL-də (English)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.

GUS (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GUS

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Short form of AUGUSTUS or ANGUS

HAZEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAY-zəl

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HECTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance

Other Scripts: ‘Εκτωρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: HEK-tər (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It was historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

HENDERSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-dər-sən

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

From a Scottish surname meaning "son of HENRY".

HERMIONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

HESTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Εστια (Ancient Greek)

Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.

HILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: HIL-də (English), HIL-dah (German, Dutch)

Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.

HILDEGARD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: HIL-de-gahrt (German)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.

HILLIARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, ?

Pronounced: HILL-ee-ard / HILL-yard

Of Greek origin, meaning "Cheer"

IRENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch, Lithuanian

Other Scripts: Ирена (Serbian)

Pronounced: ee-RE-nah (Polish), ee-RAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Latinate form of IRENE

IVA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech

Feminine form of IVO (1)

JACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK

Rating: 85% based on 4 votes

Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAN-is

Elaborated form of JANE, created by Paul Leicester Ford for his novel 'Janice Meredith' (1899).

JEAN (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: JEEN

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.

JEANIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEE-nee

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of JEAN (2)

JED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JED

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Short form of JEDIDIAH

JIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JIM

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Medieval diminutive of JAMES

JOAN (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JON

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

JOE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JO

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Short form of JOSEPH. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).

JOHNNY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAHN-ee

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).

JUANITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: hwah-NEE-tah

Diminutive of JUANA

KIM (1)

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KIM

At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.

LAUREL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-əl

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.

LAURENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-REEN

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of LAURA

LAURENTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of LAURENTIN

LEOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of LEO

LESTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LES-tər

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

From a surname which was derived from the name of the city of Leicester, originally denoting a person who was from that place. The city's name is derived from the river name Ligore combined with Latin castra "camp".

LISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIS-ə

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Short form of MELISSA

LOIS (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λωις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LO-is (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Possibly derived from Greek λωιων (loion) meaning "more desirable" or "better". Lois is mentioned in the New Testament as the mother of Eunice and the grandmother of Timothy. As an English name, it came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In fiction, this is the name of the girlfriend of the comic book hero Superman.

LORELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Variant of LAUREL

LORI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ee

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of LAURA or LORRAINE

LUCINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Rating: 88% based on 4 votes

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARGARETE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: mahr-gah-RE-tə

Rating: 80% based on 3 votes

German form of MARGARET

MARIANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: mah-ree-AH-nə (German)

Rating: 36% based on 5 votes

Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.

MARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical

Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)

Pronounced: MAHRK (English, Russian)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second Gospel in the New Testament. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He actually took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish

Other Scripts: Мартин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: MAHR-tən (English), mar-TEN (French), MAHR-teen (German), MAHR-tin (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAWR-teen (Hungarian), mahr-TIN (Bulgarian)

Rating: 36% based on 5 votes

From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MELINDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-LIN-də

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda.

MELVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MEL-vin

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

From a Scottish surname which probably originated as a variant of MELVILLE.

MORTY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAWR-tee

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of MORTON or MORTIMER

MYRNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: MUR-na

Anglicized form of MUIRNE

NASH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: NASH

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-). It was popularized in the 1990s by the television series 'Nash Bridges'.

NAT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NAT

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Short form of NATHAN, NATHANIEL, NATALIE, or other names beginning with Nat.

NATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נָתָן (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαν (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NAY-thən (English), na-TAWN (French)

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

Means "he gave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a prophet and a son of King David. It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation.

NEPTUNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)

Pronounced: NEP-toon (English), NEP-tyoon (English), NEP-choon (English)

From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.

NESSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NES-ə

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Short form of VANESSA and other names ending in nessa.

NIGEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NIE-jəl

From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).

NUMITOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. In Roman mythology Numitor was the king of Alba Longa and the father of Rhea Silvia. He was overthrown by his brother Amulius, but reinstated by his grandsons Romulus and Remus.

ODELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Form of ODILIA

PEARL

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PURL

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.

PHOEBE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)

Rating: 10% based on 3 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PRISCILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical

Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə (English), pree-SHEEL-lah (Italian)

Rating: 15% based on 4 votes

Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).

PROMETHEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Προμηθευς (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: prə-MEE-thee-əs (English)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Derived from Greek προμηθεια (prometheia) meaning "foresight, forethought". In Greek myth he was the Titan who gave the knowledge of fire to mankind. For doing this he was punished by Zeus, who had him chained to a rock and caused an eagle to feast daily on his liver, which regenerated itself each night. Herakles eventually freed him.

QUINTESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: kwin-tesə

Feminine form of [Quintinus], which means "fifth" in Latin. Also related to other names such as the masculine [Quentin] and feminine [Quintella] and [Quintina].

RACHEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: רָחֵל (Hebrew), Ραχηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: RAY-chəl (English), ra-SHEL (French), RAH-khəl (Dutch)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. The name was common among Jews in the Middle Ages, but it was not generally used as a Christian name in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation.

RHEUA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: American (South, Rare)

Pronounced: ROO

ROBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic

Other Scripts: Роберт (Russian)

Pronounced: RAH-bərt (English), ro-BER (French), RO-bert (German), RO-bərt (Dutch), RAW-bert (Polish), RO-byert (Russian), RO-beert (Russian)

From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.

The name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actors Robert Redford (1936-), Robert De Niro (1943-) and Robert Downey Jr. (1965-).

RODDY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: RAH-dee (English)

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of RODERICK or RODNEY

ROGER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish

Pronounced: RAH-jər (English), ro-ZHE (French)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.

RONALD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: RAHN-əld

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).

ROSALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, English

Pronounced: ro-za-LEE (French), RO-zə-lee (English)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

French and German form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: RAWS (English)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.

ROZ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAHZ

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Short form of ROSALIND, ROSAMUND, and other names beginning with the same sound.

RUDY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO-dee

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of RUDOLF

RUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

From the name of the bitter medicinal herb, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘ρυτη (rhyte). This is also sometimes used as a short form of RUTH (1).

RUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Feminine form of RUNE

RUSS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RUS

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Short form of RUSSELL

RUSSELL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RUS-əl

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

From a surname which meant "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.

RUTH (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)

Rating: 85% based on 4 votes

From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament, a Moabite woman who was the ancestor of King David. As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SADIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SAY-dee

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of SARAH

SAGE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SAYJ

From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.

SANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, French, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian

Other Scripts: Сандра (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: SAHN-drah (Italian, Dutch), SAN-drə (English), ZAHN-drah (German)

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).

SANDRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Elaborated form of SANDRA

SARAI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שָׂרָי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SER-ie (English)

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Means "my princess" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this was Sarah's name before God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).

SAVANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).

SAWYER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər

From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).

SERINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Variant of SERENA

SONNET

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern, Rare)

Pronounced: SAHN-it

Diminutive of Italian sonetto - song, sound; little song. Also the term for a short lyric poem, usually with eight line stanzas, followed by six line
stanzas.

The sonnets of William Shakespeare, on the other hand, are typically three Sicilian quatrains, followed by an heroic couplet.

SOPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), so-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-ah (German)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which was the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STEPHANIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: STEF-ə-nee (English), SHTE-fah-nee (German)

Feminine form of STEPHEN

SVETLANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Светлана (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: svyet-LAH-nah (Russian), sveet-LAH-nah (Russian)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Derived from the Slavic element svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem 'Svetlana' (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.

SYLVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German

Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English)

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

SYLVIANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Variant of SYLVAINE

TAMAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: תָּמָר (Hebrew), თამარ (Georgian)

Pronounced: TAH-mahr (English), TAY-mahr (English)

Means "palm tree" in Hebrew. Tamar is the daughter-in-law of Judah in the Old Testament. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of a daughter of David. This name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.

TATIANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: ta-tee-AN-ə, ta-TYAN-ə

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

Variant of TATIANA

TESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TES-ə

Rating: 73% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of THERESA

THELMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEL-mə

Rating: 7% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown. It was a rare name when British author Marie Corelli used it for the Norwegian heroine of her novel 'Thelma' (1887). The name became popular around the end of the 19th century after the novel was published. It is sometimes claimed to derive from Greek θελημα (thelema) meaning "will", though this seems unlikely.

THERESA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: tə-REE-sə (English), tə-RAY-zə (English), te-RE-zah (German)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).

The name was mainly confined to Spain and Portugal during the Middle Ages. After the 16th century it was spread to other parts of the Christian world, due to the fame of the Spanish nun and reformer Saint Teresa of Ávila. Another famous bearer was the Austrian Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), who inherited the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, beginning the War of the Austrian Succession.

THORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Modern form of ÞÓRA

TINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian

Pronounced: TEE-nə (English), TEE-nah (Italian, Dutch)

Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA and in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA.

TRENTON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TREN-tən

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "TRENT's town".

ULYSSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: yoo-LIS-ə

Feminine form of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: yoo-LIS-eez (English)

Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.

UNDINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.

UNITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: YUW-ni-tee

From the English word unity, which is ultimately derived from Latin unitas.

URANIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ουρανιη, Ουρανια (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: yuw-RAY-nee-ə (English)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of OURANIA

VALENCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: bah-LEN-thyah (Spanish), bah-LEN-syah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

From a Late Latin name which was derived from valentia "power". Cities in Spain and Venezuela bear this name.

VALERIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Czech

Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree (English), VAH-le-ree (German)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.

VENUS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Pronounced: VEE-nəs (English)

Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love, equal to the Greek goddess Aphrodite. This is also the name of the second planet from the sun.

VERN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VURN

Short form of VERNON

VERNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VUR-nə

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of VERNON, sometimes associated with the Latin word vernus "spring". It has been in use since the 19th century.

VESPER

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology, Popular Culture

Pronounced: VES-pur (Popular Culture)

Roman equivalent of [Hesperos]. Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology, meaning that the ancient Romans had incorporated many elements from Greek mythology into their own. Thus, some names were directly taken from Greek mythology and romanized, rather than inventing a legitimate Latin equivalent of it. Vesper is an example of such a name.
The name is directly taken from the Latin word for "evening."

In popular culture, Vesper was the name of James Bond's partner, and later lover, in the novel Casino Royale.

VICTORIA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Means "victory" in Latin. Victoria was the Roman goddess of victory.

VICTORINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

French feminine form of VICTORINUS

VIRGINIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə (English), veer-JEE-nyah (Italian), beer-KHEE-nyah (Spanish)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

VIVIAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).

VIVIANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Variant of VIVIANE

WADE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WAYD

From an English surname, either WADE (1) or WADE (2).

WARNER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WAHR-nər

From a Norman surname which was derived from the given name WERNER.

WAYNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WAYN

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.

WENONAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: wə-NON-ə

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Variant of WINONA. This spelling of the name was used by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow for the mother of Hiawatha in his epic poem 'The Song of Hiawatha' (1855).

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WILMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, English

Pronounced: VIL-mah (German, Dutch), WIL-mah (Dutch), WIL-mə (English)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Short form of WILHELMINA. German settlers introduced it to America in the 19th century.

XAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ZAN

Can be used as a nickname for [Xanthe], [Alexander] and other names containing this element.

XANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: KSAHN-drah

Short form of ALEXANDRA

XIOMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Possibly a Spanish form of GUIOMAR

YANCY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: YANT-see

From a surname, which was an Americanized form of the Dutch surname Jansen meaning "JAN (1)'s son".

YARDEN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: יַרְדֵן (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of JORDAN

YARONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: יָרוֹנָה (Hebrew)

Feminine form of YARON

YUSRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: يسرى (Arabic)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Means "wealth, ease" in Arabic.

ZACHARY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree

Usual English form of ZACHARIAS. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).

ZEBULON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Variant of ZEBULUN

ZENITH

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Modern, Rare)

Pronounced: ZEE-nith

From Middle English senith, from cinit, from Old French cenit and/or Latin cenit, a transliteration of Arabic سمت (samt, "direction, path") which is in itself a weak abbreviation of سمت الرأس (samt ar-ra's, "direction of the head").

In modern English, zenith means "the highest point or state; peak" and in astronomy, refers to "the point in the sky vertically above a given position or observer" or "the highest point in the sky reached by a celestial body."

ZIPPORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə (English), ZIP-ər-ə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah) which meant "bird". In the Old Testament she is the wife of Moses.

ZORICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Зорица (Serbian, Macedonian)

Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian diminutive of ZORA

ZURIÑE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Derived from Basque zuri "white".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.