littleRainbow's Personal Name List

LACEY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAY-see

From a surname which was a variant of LACY

LACY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAY-see

From a surname which was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name which was Latinized as Lascius.

LÆRKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Means "lark" in Danish.

LAINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Estonian

Pronounced: LIE-ne

Means "wave" in Estonian.

LAINEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: LAYN-ee

Variant of LANEY

LALA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Лала (Bulgarian)

From a South Slavic word meaning "tulip". It is derived via Turkish from Persian لاله (laleh).

LALEH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Persian

Other Scripts: لاله (Persian)

Means "tulip" in Persian.

LANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Лана (Russian, Serbian)

Pronounced: LAH-nə (English)

Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).

LANEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAYN-ee

Diminutive of ELAINE

LANI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian

Means "sky, heaven, royal, majesty" in Hawaiian.

LAOISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: LEE-sha

Possibly a newer form of LUIGSECH. It is also used as an Irish form of Louise.

LARISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-RIS-ə

Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.

LARK

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LAHRK

From the English word for the type of songbird.

LATOYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: African American

Pronounced: lə-TOI-ə

Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TOYA.

LAURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: LAWR-ə (English), LOW-rah (Spanish, Italian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch)

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. A famous bearer was Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812.

LAURE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: LOR

French form of LAURA

LAUREN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ən

Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.

LAURENTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).

LAYLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, English

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)

Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian

Pronounced: LE-ah (German, Finnish)

Form of LEAH

LEAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament, Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEIGH

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LEE

From a surname which was a variant of LEE.

LEILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)

Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LEILANI

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Hawaiian

Pronounced: LAY-lah-nee

Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".

LELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of LAELIA

LENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Лена (Russian)

Pronounced: LE-nah (German, Italian), LYE-nah (Russian), LEE-nə (English)

Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.

LENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian

Pronounced: LE-nə (German), LE-ne (Danish, Norwegian)

German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE

LENI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LE-nee

German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA

LEOCADIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Late Roman

Late Latin name perhaps derived from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white". Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.

LEONE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Variant of LEONA

LEONIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: LE-o-nee (German), lay-o-NEE (Dutch)

German and Dutch feminine form of LEONIUS

LEONOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Spanish and Portuguese form of ELEANOR. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married king Alfonso VIII of Castile.

LEONORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: le-o-NO-rə

German short form of ELEANOR

LEYLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Azerbaijani, English (Modern)

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)

Variant of LEILA

LIBERTY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIB-ər-tee

Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).

LIEKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: LEE-kə

Dutch diminutive of ANGELIQUE or names ending in lia.

LIEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: LEEN

Short form of CAROLIEN and other names ending in lien.

LIES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: LEES

German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH

LIESBETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: LEES-bət

Dutch variant of ELISABETH

LIESE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: LEE-zə (German), LEE-sə (Dutch)

German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH

LIESEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LEE-zel

German diminutive of ELISABETH

LIESELOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LEE-ze-law-tə

Variant of LISELOTTE

LIESL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

German short form of ELISABETH

LILA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)

Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.

LILI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, French, Hungarian

German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.

LILIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən (English)

Variant of LILLIAN

LILIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English

Pronounced: lee-LYAH-nah (Italian, Polish), lil-ee-AN-ə (English)

Latinate form of LILLIAN

LILIBETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Diminutive of ELIZABETH

LILITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: LIL-ith (English)

Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.

LILLI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Finnish

Pronounced: LI-lee (German), LEEL-lee (Finnish)

German variant of LILI and a Finnish variant of LILJA.

LILLIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən

Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.

LILO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LEE-lo

Short form of LISELOTTE

LILOU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: lee-LOO

Either a diminutive of French names containing the sound lee or a combination of LILI and LOUISE.

LILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee

From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LINA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Croatian

Short form of names ending in lina.

LING

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Chinese

Other Scripts: 灵, 铃 (Chinese)

From Chinese "spirit, soul" or "bell, chime".

LINN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: LIN

Short form of LINNÉA

LINNET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: li-NET, LIN-ət

Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.

LIOR

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר (Hebrew)

Means "light for me" in Hebrew.

LISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian

Pronounced: LEE-sə (English), LEE-zah (German)

Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.

LISBETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LEES-bet

German short form of ELISABETH

LISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: LEE-se (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), LEES (English), LEEZ (English)

Short form of ELISABETH or ELIZABETH

LISELOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish

Pronounced: LEE-ze-law-tə (German)

Contraction of LISA and CHARLOTTE

LIV (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: LEEV

Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".

LIVNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִבְנָה (Hebrew)

Means "white" in Hebrew.

LIZ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIZ

Short form of ELIZABETH. This is the familiar name of actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-).

LIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Russian, Hungarian

Other Scripts: Лиза (Russian)

Pronounced: LIE-zə (English)

Short form of ELIZABETH or YELIZAVETA

LOES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: LOOS

Feminine diminutive of LODEWIJK

LOIS (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λωις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LO-is (English)

Possibly derived from Greek λωιων (loion) meaning "more desirable" or "better". Lois is mentioned in the New Testament as the mother of Eunice and the grandmother of Timothy. As an English name, it came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In fiction, this is the name of the girlfriend of the comic book hero Superman.

LOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, English

Pronounced: LO-lah (Spanish), LO-lə (English)

Diminutive of DOLORES

LONDON

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: LUN-dən

From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).

LOREDANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Romanian

Created by the French author George Sand for a character in her novel 'Mattea' (1833) and later used by the Italian author Luciano Zuccoli in his novel 'L'amore de Loredana' (1908). It was possibly based on the Venetian surname Loredan, which was derived from the place name Loreo.

LORELEI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Germanic Mythology

Pronounced: lawr-e-LIE, LAWR-e-lie

From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.

LORENZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).

LORETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: lə-RET-ə (English), lo-RET-tah (Italian)

Either an elaboration of LORA or a variant of LAURETTA. It is also sometimes used as a variant of LORETO.

LORRAINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-RAYN

From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.

LOTTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Finnish

Pronounced: LOT-tah (Finnish)

Short form of CHARLOTTA

LOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Danish

Pronounced: LAW-tə (German)

Short form of LISELOTTE or CHARLOTTE

LOTTIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Diminutive of CHARLOTTE

LOU

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: LOO (English)

Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941).

LOUELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: loo-EL-ə

Combination of LOU and the popular name suffix ella.

LOUISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə (English), loo-EES-ə (English)

Latinate feminine form of LOUIS

LOUISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EEZ (French, English), loo-EE-se (Danish)

French feminine form of LOUIS

LOUISETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Diminutive of LOUISE

LOUIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Λουιζα (Greek)

Greek feminine form of LOUIS

LOURDES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Various

Pronounced: LOOR-des (Spanish), LUWRD (French), LAWRDZ (English)

From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.

LOVISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: loo-VEE-sah

Swedish feminine form of LOUIS

LUANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: loo-AN-ə (English), loo-AH-nah (Italian)

From the movie 'Bird of Paradise' (1932), in which it was borne by the main character, a Polynesian girl. The movie was based on a 1912 play of the same name set in Hawaii.

LUANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: loo-AN-ə

Either a combination of LOU and ANNA or a variant of LUANA.

LUANNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: loo-AN

Variant of LUANN

LUCA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hungarian, Croatian

Pronounced: LOO-tsah (Croatian)

Hungarian and Croatian form of LUCIA

LUCASTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".

LUCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, French

Pronounced: LOO-che (Italian), LOOS (French)

Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.

LUCÍA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Catalan

Pronounced: loo-THEE-ah (Spanish), loo-SEE-ah (Latin American Spanish)

Spanish and Catalan form of LUCIA

LUCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHEE-ah (Italian), LOO-tsee-ah (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English)

Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUCIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHAH-nah (Italian), loo-THYAH-nah (Spanish), loo-SYAH-nah (Latin American Spanish)

Feminine form of LUCIANUS

LUCIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Czech

Pronounced: luy-SEE (French), luw-TSI-e (Czech)

French and Czech form of LUCIA

LUCIENNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: luy-SYEN

Feminine form of LUCIEN

LUCILLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: loo-SEEL

French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).

LUCINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LUDOVICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: loo-do-VEE-kah

Latinate feminine form of LUDWIG

LUELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: loo-EL-ə

Variant of LOUELLA

LUÍSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Pronounced: loo-EE-zə

Feminine form of LUÍS

LUISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: LWEE-sah (Spanish), LWEE-zah (Italian)

Feminine form of LUIS

LUISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: loo-EE-zə

German form of LOUISE

LUIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish, Portuguese, Romanian

Pronounced: luw-EE-zah (Polish)

Polish, Portuguese and Romanian feminine form of LOUIS

LUJAYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: لجين (Arabic)

Means "silver" in Arabic.

LULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-lə

Diminutive of LOUISE and names that begin with Lu.

LULE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Albanian

Means "flower" in Albanian.

LULU (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LOO-loo

Diminutive of names that begin with Lu, especially LUISE.

LUMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Pronounced: LOO-mee

Means "snow" in Finnish.

LUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LUNED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: LIN-ed (Welsh)

Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.

LUPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: LOO-pe

Short form of GUADALUPE

LUTGARDIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Latinized form of the Germanic name LUITGARD

LUULE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Estonian

Means "poetry" in Estonian.

LUUS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, Limburgish

Pronounced: LUYS

Dutch and Limburgish form of LUCIA

LUZ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: LOOTH (Spanish), LOOS (Latin American Spanish)

Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".

LUZIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, German

Portuguese and German form of LUCIA

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German, Finnish)

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYKKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Means "good fortune, happiness" in Danish.

LYNN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIN

From an English surname which was derived from Welsh llyn "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls. In some cases it may be thought of as a short form of LINDA or names that end in lyn or line.

LYRIC

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: LIR-ik

Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MAAYAN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מַעֲיָן (Hebrew)

Means "spring of water" in Hebrew.

MABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-bəl

Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).

MACKENZIE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-KEN-zee

From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).

MACY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-see

From an English surname which was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius. This is the name of a chain of American department stores founded by Rowland Hussey Macy (1822-1877).

MÄDCHEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Means "girl" in German. It is not used as a name in Germany itself.

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Swedish

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

French form of MAGDALENE

MADELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), ma-də-LEEN (French), mad-LEEN (French)

English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.

MADISON

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAD-i-sən

From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president.

MADONNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-DAHN-ə

From a title of the Virgin Mary meaning "my lady" in Italian. A famous bearer of the name is American singer Madonna Ciccone (1958-), known simply as Madonna.

MAE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAËLYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MAEVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Tahitian, French

Means "welcome" in Tahitian.

MAFALDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese

Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA

MAGALI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Occitan

Pronounced: ma-ga-LEE (French)

Occitan form of MAGDALENE

MAGALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Variant of MAGALI

MAGDALENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish, English

Other Scripts: Магдалена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Pronounced: mahg-dah-LE-nah (Polish), mahk-dah-LE-nah (German), MAHG-dah-le-nah (Finnish), mag-da-LAY-na (English)

Latinate form of MAGDALENE

MAHALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Variant of MAHALA

MAI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Vietnamese

Means "apricot blossom" in Vietnamese.

MAIA (3)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Basque form of MARIA

MAIALEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Basque form of MAGDALENE

MAIARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Native American, Tupí

Means "wise" in Tupí.

MAIMU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Estonian

Pronounced: MIE-moo

Means "little" in Estonian.

MAISIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: MAY-zee

Diminutive of MAIREAD

MAITE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Means "lovable" in Basque.

MAJA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish

Other Scripts: Маја (Serbian)

Pronounced: MIE-ah (German, Polish)

Form of MAIA (1)

MAKENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: mə-KEN-ə

Variant of MCKENNA

MALAI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Thai

Other Scripts: มาลัย (Thai)

Means "garland of flowers" in Thai.

MALAIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ملائكة (Arabic)

Pronounced: mah-LIEK-ah

Means "angels" from the plural of Arabic ملك (malak).

MALI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Thai

Other Scripts: มาลี (Thai)

Means "flower" in Thai.

MALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian

Either a Hawaiian form of MARIA or a variant of MALIE.

MALIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish

Pronounced: MAH-lin (Swedish, Norwegian), MAH-leen (Finnish)

Swedish and Norwegian short form of MAGDALENE

MALINA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish (Rare)

Other Scripts: Малина (Bulgarian, Serbian)

Pronounced: mah-LEE-nah (Polish)

Means "raspberry" in several Slavic languages.

MALINI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मालिनी (Hindi)

Means "fragrant" in Sanskrit.

MALKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מַלְכָּה (Hebrew)

Means "queen" in Hebrew.

MAMIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-mee

Diminutive of MARY or MARGARET

MANAMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 愛美, 愛海 (Japanese)

Pronounced: mah-nah-mee

From Japanese 愛 (mana) "love, affection" combined with 美 (mi) "beautiful" or 海 (mi) "sea, ocean".

MANDY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAN-dee

Diminutive of AMANDA

MANJULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मञ्जुला (Hindi)

Means "lovely, beautiful" in Sanskrit.

MARCELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Ancient Roman

Feminine form of MARCELLUS

MARCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: MAHR-shə (English), MAHR-see-ə (English), MAHR-thyah (Spanish), MAHR-syah (Latin American Spanish)

Feminine form of MARCIUS. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

MARCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-see

Diminutive of MARCIA

MAREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian

Danish form of MARINA

MARGALIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מַרְגָלִית (Hebrew)

Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites).

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARGARETHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German

Pronounced: mahr-gah-RE-tah (German)

Dutch and German form of MARGARET

MARGARETHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish

Pronounced: mahr-gah-RE-tə (German)

German and Danish form of MARGARET

MARGERY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree

Medieval English form of MARGARET

MARIA

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Маріа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: mah-REE-ah (Italian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), MAHR-yah (Polish), MAH-ree-ah (Finnish)

Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical Greek, Georgian, Armenian, Arabic

Other Scripts: Μαριαμ (Ancient Greek), მარიამ (Georgian), Մարիամ (Armenian), مريم (Arabic)

Form of MARIA used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as the Georgian and Armenian form. It is also a variant transcription of Arabic MARYAM.

MARIANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Greek

Other Scripts: Μαριαννα (Greek)

Pronounced: mer-ee-AN-ə (English), mar-ee-AN-ə (English), mahr-YAHN-nah (Polish)

Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of MARIAMNE.

MARICRUZ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Contraction of MARÍA and CRUZ

MARIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-REE (French), mah-REE (German)

French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

MARIETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Italian diminutive of MARIA

MARIGOLD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MER-ə-gold, MAR-ə-gold

From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.

MARIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Greek, Finnish, Estonian

Other Scripts: Μαρικα (Greek)

Pronounced: MAH-ree-kah (Finnish)

Diminutive of MARIA

MARIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: MAH-ree-kə

Dutch diminutive of MARIA

MARILOU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: mer-i-LOO (English), mar-i-LOO (English)

Combination of MARIA and LOUISE

MARILYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-ə-lin, MER-lin, MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin

Combination of MARY and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).

MARISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English

Pronounced: mah-REE-zah (Italian), mah-REE-sah (Spanish), mə-RIS-ə (English)

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.

MARISOL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".

MARISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-RIS-ə

Variant of MARISA

MARIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian

Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET

MARJANI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Means "coral" in Swahili, originally a borrowing from Arabic.

MARJORIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree

Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.

MARLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-lə

Shortened form of MARLENE

MARLENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, English

Pronounced: mahr-LE-nə (German), MAHR-leen (English)

Blend of MARIA and MAGDALENE. It refers, therefore, to Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament. The name was popularized by the German actress and singer Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), whose real name was Maria Magdalene von Losch.

MARLEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MAHR-lee

From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).

MARLOES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: mahr-LOOS

Combination of MARIA and LOES

MARNI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Means "rejoice" in Hebrew.

MARNIE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-nee

Variant of MARNA. This name was brought to public attention by Alfred Hitchcock's movie 'Marnie' (1964).

MARNIE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Variant of MARNI

MARSAILI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA

MÄRTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Swedish short form of MARGARETA

MARTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Georgian

Other Scripts: Марта (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მართა (Georgian)

Pronounced: MAHR-tah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech)

Cognate of MARTHA

MARTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian

Norwegian variant of MARTHA

MARTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Μαρθα (Greek), Марѳа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: MAHR-thə (English)

From Aramaic מרתא (marta') meaning "lady, mistress". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington.

MARTHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German

Pronounced: MAHRT (French), MAHR-tə (German)

French and German form of MARTHA

MARVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-və

Feminine form of MARVIN

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MARYAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Persian

Other Scripts: مريم (Arabic), مریم (Persian)

Arabic and Persian form of MARIA. In Iran it is also the name of a flower, the tuberose, which is named after the Virgin Mary.

MARYLOU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mer-ee-LOO, mar-ee-LOO

Combination of MARY and LOU

MATHILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English, Swedish)

Variant of MATILDA

MATHILDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-TEELD (French), mah:-TIL-də (Dutch)

Cognate of MATILDA

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English), MAH-teel-dah (Finnish)

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MATILDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: mah-TEEL-de (Spanish)

Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of MATILDA

MAVIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-vis

From the name of the type of bird, also called the song thrush, ultimately derived from Old French. It was first used as a given name by the British author Marie Corelli, who used it for a character in her novel 'The Sorrows of Satan' (1895).

MÁXIMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: MAHK-see-mah

Spanish feminine form of MAXIMUS

MAXIMILIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Feminine form of MAXIMILIANUS

MAXIMILIENNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French feminine form of MAXIMILIAN

MAXINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mak-SEEN

Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.

MAY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.

MAYA (3)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מַיָּה (Hebrew)

Derived from Hebrew מַיִם (mayim) "water".

MAYBELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Variant of MABEL

MAYIM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: ?

Means "water" in Hebrew. This is the name of a Jewish folk dance.

MBALI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Southern African, Zulu

Means "flower" in Zulu.

MCKENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: mə-KEN-ə

From the Gaelic surname Mac Cionaodha, which means "son of CIONAODH".

MCKENZIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: mə-KEN-zee

Variant of MACKENZIE

MEADOW

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MED-o

From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.

MECHTHILD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: MEKHT-hilt

German variant of MATHILDE

MELBA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MEL-bə

From the surname of the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931). This was a stage name that she got from the name of the city Melbourne, where she was born.

MELE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian

Means "song" in Hawaiian. This name is also used as a Hawaiian and Samoan form of MARY.

MELITTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek, German

Other Scripts: Μελιττα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: me-LI-tah (German)

Ancient Attic Greek variant of MELISSA

MELODY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MEL-ə-dee

From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".

MERCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MUR-see

From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

MEREDITH

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: MER-ə-dith (English)

From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).

MERYEM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish, Uyghur

Other Scripts: مەريەم (Uyghur)

Turkish and Uyghur form of Miriam (see MARY).

METTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian

Pronounced: MED-de (Danish)

Danish diminutive of MARGARET

MIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: MEE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German), MEE-ə (English)

Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".

MICAELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of MICHAEL

MICHAELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak

Pronounced: mi-khah-E-lah (German), mi-KAY-lə (English)

Feminine form of MICHAEL

MICHAL (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִיכַל (Hebrew)

Possibly means "brook" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Saul who marries David.

MICHELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French feminine diminutive of MICHEL

MICHELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: mee-SHEL (French), mi-SHEL (English)

French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.

MIEKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: MEE-kə

Dutch diminutive of MARIA

MIKA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 美香, 美加 (Japanese)

Pronounced: mee-kah

From Japanese 美 (mi) "beautiful" combined with 香 (ka) "smell, perfume" or 加 (ka) "increase".

MIKAELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: MEE-kah-e-lah (Finnish)

Feminine form of MICHAEL

MIKHAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִיכַל (Ancient Hebrew)

Biblical Hebrew form of MICHAL (2)

MIKKELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Danish feminine form of MIKKEL

MILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Czech

Other Scripts: Мила (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".

MILANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Czech

Other Scripts: Милана (Serbian)

Variant of MILENA

MILBURGA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: History

Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.

MILDRED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIL-drəd

From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.

MILENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian

Other Scripts: Милена (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Russian)

Pronounced: mee-LE-nah (Italian)

Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.

MILEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MIE-lee

In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.

MILKA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: מִלְכָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "queen" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to both the wife of Nahor and the daughter of Zelophehad.

MILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: MEEL-lah (Finnish)

Short form of CAMILLA and other names that end in milla.

MILLICENT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIL-ə-sənt

From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.

MINDY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIN-dee

Diminutive of MELINDA

MINNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Finnish

Pronounced: MI-nah (German), MEEN-nah (Finnish)

German short form of WILHELMINA and a Finnish short form of VILHELMIINA.

MINNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIN-ee

Diminutive of WILHELMINA

MINTY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MIN-tee

Diminutive of ARAMINTA

MIO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 美桜, 美緒 (Japanese)

Pronounced: mee-o

From Japanese 美 (mi) "beautiful" combined with 桜 (ou) "cherry blossom" or 緒 (o) "thread".

MIRA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish

Other Scripts: Мира (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".

MIRABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Latinate form of MIRABELLE

MIRABELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)

Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MIRJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Pronounced: MEER-yah

Finnish form of MIRIAM

MIRTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Croatian

Means "myrtle" in Croatian.

MIRTHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: MIR-tə

Variant of MYRTHE

MITZI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: MIT-see

German diminutive of MARIA

MIYU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 美優, 美結, 実優, 美夕 (Japanese)

Pronounced: mee-yoo

From Japanese 美 (mi) "beautiful" or 実 (mi) "truth" combined with 優 (yu) "gentleness, superiority" or 結 (yu) "tie, bind" or 夕 (yu) "evening".

MOA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: MOO-ah

Possibly derived from Swedish moder meaning "mother". This was the pen name of the Swedish author Moa Martinson (real name Helga Maria Martinson).

MOANA

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Maori, Hawaiian

Means "ocean, wide expanse of water, deep sea" in Maori and Hawaiian.

MOEMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Native American, Tupí

Means "sweet" in Tupí.

MOLLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHL-ee

Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.

MONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: MAHN-i-kə (English)

Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.

MONIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Lithuanian, Latvian

Pronounced: MO-ni-kah (German), maw-NEE-kah (Polish)

Form of MONICA

MONTANA

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: mahn-TAN-ə

From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".

MORGAN (1)

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English, French

Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English)

From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

MOUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: منى (Arabic)

Variant transcription of MUNA

MUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: منى (Arabic)

Means "wishes, desires", from the plural of Arabic منية (munyah).

MWANAJUMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Means "born on Friday" in Swahili.

MY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Swedish diminutive of MARIA

MYRTLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MUR-təl

Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μυρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.

NA'AMAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: נַעֲמָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Biblical Hebrew form of NAAMAH

NAAMAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: נַעֲמָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: NAY-ə-mə (English), nah-ah-MAH (Jewish)

Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.

NADIA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: نديّة (Arabic)

Variant transcription of NADIYYA

NAIARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.

NA'IMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: نعيمة (Arabic)

Feminine form of NA'IM

NALANI

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Hawaiian

Means "the heavens" or "the chiefs" from Hawaiian , a definite article, and lani "heaven, sky, chief".

NAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NAN

Diminutive of ANNE (1) and a short form of NANCY.

NANA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 菜々, 奈々 (Japanese)

Pronounced: nah-nah

From a duplication of Japanese 菜 (na) "vegetables, greens" or 奈 (na), a phonetic character.

NANAMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 七海, 菜々美 (Japanese)

Pronounced: nah-nah-mee

From Japanese 七 (nana) "seven" and 海 (mi) "sea". It can also come from 菜 (na) "vegetables, greens" duplicated and 美 (mi) "beautiful".

NANAYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology

Meaning unknown, possibly related to INANNA. This was the name of a goddess worshipped by the Sumerians and Akkadians. She was later conflated with the goddesses Anahita and Aphrodite.

NANCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NANT-see

Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANNE (1). It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NARCISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: nar-SIS-ə (English)

Feminine form of NARCISSUS
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.