View Message

[Facts] How to pronounce - Gytha
I've only ever seen this name written and imagined it to be said 'GUY-tha' with a soft 'th'. But I've seen here it should be said 'GEE-tha' which I like a lot less, or 'GI-tha'.
Tags:  pronunciation
vote up1vote down

Replies

In modern English speech, a reasonable approximation (not massively faithful to the original period pronunciation as Harold II of England might have used for his daughter but good enough and not too demanding of dexterity with the tongue or grating on modern phonetic sensibilities) would probably be with a G like in "give", a Y like the "i" in "give", a TH like in "truTH", and the two vowel sounds together and general rhythm and stress like in the word "giver". Like "Guy" is just absolutely and horrendously wrong. Pronouncing the letter Y like this is almost unknown outside of modern English, which is very strange compared to how most other languages are written.
vote up1vote down
Hi !!!I pronounce it GEE-tah with hard g like Ginsberg and guitar.Byeeeeeee

This message was edited by the author 8/8/2016, 2:39 AM

vote up1vote down
If we're looking at Nanny Ogg, it sounds like GUYtha in the UK videos etc. I don't imagine it has much usage outside the Discworld, but if it does, then presumably GEEtha would be sufficiently accurate for most purposes.
vote up1vote down
Hello my name is Gytha.
I pronounce my name as YI-tha.
vote up1vote down
Before certain vowels it is pronounced like the Modern English "y" in the word "yes": gifu. When "g" is used before other vowels it is pronounced the same as Modern English "g" in "golden": goda. Some editors indicate this voiced pronunciation of "g" by putting a dot above the consonant.
vote up1vote down
It's a silent G.
vote up1vote down
You'll have to be more specific — different languages use different orthographies — the standard way sounds are written. E.g. in OE gytha would be pronounced yu:tha or ɣu:tha, with a front (umlauted) u (as in German über, IPA |y|). In late West Saxon and Anglian that umlauted u (y) was unrounded to i, frequently written as such, so we get Edith from Eadgyth (with further leveling of Ea to E and then to the modern long I pronunciation). BTW in this period English g had five sounds depending on the following vowel, the preceding consonant, or if final; something close to phonetic |j| (modern English y in yacht) before front vowels like i, e, and medial æ (as in bat, bad); a voiced guttural spirant (also called a velar fricative), by late OE the familiar guttural explosive (velar stop), before back vowels such as a, o and u; in the combination ng it could be either a palatal (the voiced palatal stop) or guttural explosive, depending on the following vowel, as gg the familiar guttural explosive, and written cg (originally gj) a palatal explosive (the palatal explosive eventually became the voiced postalveolar affricate g of hinge and bridge); and when final or before the voiced consonants (s, t, th) it was the ch sound of loch or German ach (written h before st, sth and th, but g when final or final gs), in modern English gh with varying pronunciation (following restoration of g for spelling conformity with declensions or inflections without the voiced consonant). So Gytha was never GUY-tha, nor GEE-tha. However, the name and word is also spelled Gutha when the G is the first letter, with o-umlaut of |y:| back to |u:|, in which case by late OE it would have been GOO-tha.
vote up1vote down