Names Categorized "war and peace"

This is a list of names in which the categories include war and peace.
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ANATOLE m French
French form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDREY m Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Bulgarian and Belarusian form of ANDREW.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
BORIS m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
FEDYA m Russian
Diminutive of FYODOR.
FYODOR m Russian
Russian form of THEODORE. It was borne by three tsars of Russia. Another notable bearer was Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the Russian author of such works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.
HÉLÈNE f French
French form of HELEN.
ILYA m Russian, Belarusian
Russian and Belarusian form of ELIJAH.
IPPOLIT m Russian
Russian form of HIPPOLYTOS.
JULIE f French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
KATYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian diminutive of YEKATERINA.
KIRILL m Russian
Russian form of CYRIL.
MARYA f Russian
Russian variant form of MARIA.
NATALYA f Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATASHA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NIKOLAI m Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
PETYA m & f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian masculine diminutive of PYOTR or Bulgarian feminine diminutive of PETAR.
PIERRE m French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PYOTR m Russian
Russian form of PETER. A famous bearer was the Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).
SONYA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1869, English translation 1886).
VASKA m & f Russian, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Russian diminutive of VASILIY (masculine) or a Macedonian and Bulgarian diminutive of VASILIJA (feminine).
VASSILY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see VASILIY).
VERA (1) f Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
YELENA f Russian
Russian form of HELEN.