Meaning
Usage
Pronunciation
Famous
Impression
Other
On the Uzbek Wikipedia, this name is written as both Farruh and Farrux, but not Farrukh - that spelling might be based more on Russian transcription rules.

- Farruh Sayfiyev (b. 1991): https://uz.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farruh_Sayfiyev (in Uzbek)
- Farruh Siyyor (1713-1719): https://uz.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farruh_Siyyor (in Uzbek)
- Farrux Kagarov (1937-2001): https://uz.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrux_Kagarov (in Uzbek)
- Farrux Yosor (15th century): https://uz.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrux_Yosor (in Uzbek)
- Farrux Zokirov (b. 1946): https://uz.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrux_Zokirov (in Uzbek)

The information about the Uzbek alphabet on the English Wikipedia states that the Uzbek Cyrillic letter -х- should always be transcribed into Latin as -x-. That is not always true in practice, however. Sometimes it is transcribed into -h- or the other way around, the Latin -h- is transcribed into the Cyrillic -х-. The latter is especially odd, since the Uzbek alphabet already has its own letter for the -h-, namely the -ҳ- (kha with descender). Yet from what I have seen so far, names that contain a -h- will more often be transcribed into Cyrillic with an -x- than with the -ҳ-. If one then transcribes back into Latin, the -h- will often be "lost" since people will be more inclined to transcribe the Cyrillic -x- as -x- or even -kh-.

Take the Persian name Bahram, for example. The proper Uzbek form should be Bahrom, with the normal 'h' sound preserved. As such, it should technically be written as Баҳром in Cyrillic, but instead it will often be written as Бахром. This results into people transcribing it into Latin as Baxrom or even Bakhrom, where the 'h' is lost in writing but seemingly also in pronunciation (as these transcriptions suggest a 'kh' sound). Meanwhile, like with Farruh/Farrux, the Uzbek Wikipedia has entries for both Bahrom and Baxrom - but not for Bakhrom.

In summary: the transcription rules for Uzbek are both inconsistent and contradictory at times. They are not always reflected on the Uzbek Wikipedia. As such, you might want to consider taking another look at the 'h' and 'kh' sounds as well as how they are written and transcribed. [noted -ed] For that, this might be a good starting point:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uzbek_alphabet#Correspondence_chart (in English)

Comments are left by users of this website. They are not checked for accuracy.

Add a Comment