Meaning
Usage
Pronunciation
Famous
Impression
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Possibly the character 君 (Jūn in Pinyin) is transcribed Kiun in Wu Chinese and Kiûn in Hakka Chinese.
Li Jun (李峻; born 1980) also known by the pen name Baoshu (宝树), is a Chinese science fiction and fantasy writer.
Lee Jun-fan (Chinese: 李振藩) was the Chinese birth name of Bruce Lee (November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973)
Kim Nam-Joon, also known as RM, is the leader of the kpop group BTS. He is very intelligent, trilingual (Korean, Japanese, and English), and always makes sure to show gratitude to the BTS fans called ARMY. Nam-Joon has many responsibilities as leader, despite not being the eldest member, including settling conflict between the seven “brothers”. He also acts as the producer and co-lyricist for many of their songs.
Junhui is a Chinese member of a Kpop boy group called Seventeen who goes by the stage name/nickname Jun.
Japanese people use this name as well.
Jun Fujita was an Issei photojournalist, photographer, silent film actor, and published poet in the United States. He was the first Japanese-American photojournalist. As an American, Fujita lived in Chicago, Illinois and worked for the now defunct newspapers: the Chicago Evening Post, published from 1886 to 1932, and Chicago Daily News, which was published 1876 to 1978. Fujita was the only photographer to document the aftermath of the St. Valentine's Day massacre. Following his death in 1963, most of his work was donated to the Chicago Historical Society, which later became the Chicago History Museum.
Jun Hiromichi is a Paralympian athlete from Japan competing mainly in category T53 wheelchair racing events. Jun competed at the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Summer Paralympics where like many wheelchair racers he competed in events as diverse as the 200m and marathon but both of his medals, a silver in 2000 and bronze in 2004, came in the 800m.
Jun Xu is from Bridgeport, a world that ships with The Sims 3: Late Night, is a bearer of this name.
Jun Kaname is a Japanese actor. He was born in Mitoyo, Kagawa. He made his drama debut as an actor in 2001 in the Tokusatsu Series "Kamen Rider Agito". He appears not only in TV dramas but also in movies, commercial messages, variety TV programs, plays, and music videos. He married a non-celebrity woman April 28, 2013.
Famous bearer of this name is Jun Maeda who is a Japanese writer and co-founder of the visual novel brand Key under VisualArt's. He is known for Kanon, Air, Clannad, Little Busters!, Angel Beats! And Charlotte.
To (hopefully) help those wondering about the pronunciation:
After a quick check with Google Translate's listen function, I would say this name sounds much closer to the English word "chin" for 俊 (jùn), and with a slightly longer vowel sound for 君 and 军 (both jūn). Not quite the same, but close.
It's still GT, though, so it's probably not perfect.
Choi Jun-hong, better known by his stage name "Zelo", is a South Korean rapper, dancer, singer and beatboxer. He is best known as a member of a South Korean K-Pop group, B.A.P as the youngest and is the lead rapper of the group.
Jun is a nice and simple handsome, elegant and cute name. It's definitely not prone to be mispronounced. Jun is one of my favourite East Asian names. ^_^
My cute little brother is named that!
I also recommend it because it is easy to say or pronounce.
Jun is one of the superheroes from the anime Science Ninja Team Gatchaman. She is the only female member of the team.
Someone actually made another page to distinguish the other unfortunate pronunciation. Well, at least there was progress.
This name is actually pronounced "jun" to rhyme with "fun" in Chinese, but "Joon" like "moon" in Korean. They share a Romanization.
No, EstherTester, the pinyin "Jun" does NOT in any way rhyme with "fun" in Chinese*. The closest approximation of the pinyin that I can get from this site's pronunciation guide is "zhuyn".

* There's no rhyme with "gun" in English, pinyin "gun" doesn't rhyme with pinyin "jun", and "fun" doesn't exist as a pinyin combination. Unless you're referring to a dialectal pronunciation, I don't see how your statement can be true, and Chinese was one of my mother tongues.

On an unrelated note, something tells me we need separate entries for names that look the same when romanised but actually come from different languages: applying that to this name, we'd have separate pages for the Japanese names and the Korean names that are romanised as "Jun". It's the same principle as that of splitting up other names, like with "Jean (1)" and "Jean (2)".
I don't understand your response, I think you just confused us even more.

In Chinese, the name is pronounced "Jun", THE SAME THING which rhymes with "fun" in English. Someone who says "fun" in English says the exact same thing for this name in Chinese, just with a 'J'. IDC about the Pinyin romanizations, I never learned that. In Mandarin Chinese, a common name is "JUN", but in Korean it is "JOON". They are the same character, which makes things even worse.

My parents told me in Cantonese it is not like that at all, it's actually "Gwun", but still isn't that the same just with a diff first sound? 'G' instead of 'J'.

Trust me, I spoke to people born and raised in both China and Korea and they admit this difference is confusing but obvious. Some of them didn't even know it 'til I pointed it out.
Also in Korean they do this with a lot of other names. One Korean-born student told me, "Well yes, that is fair to say. It depends on which pronunciation system you're using. In syllables, 'J-U' is supposed to be 'Joo'" Not 'Juh', so yeah.

Yun is Yoon, Mun is Moon (this is my name, which means "culture" doing the same thing with an 'M'), and so forth.
I'm not sure how to put this across in an accessible manner since you've said you don't care about the Pinyin (... not a very wise move, especially when the latter is the standardised way in which Mandarin Chinese is romanised nowadays for learners within China itself, as well as in places -- be they countries or schools -- that have adopted the same system). I'm still going to have to refer to it anyway (and even to the International Phonetic Alphabet, which I'm afraid you'll need to look up) to show you the differences, so I'll need you to bear with me.

"In Chinese, the name is pronounced "Jun", THE SAME THING which rhymes with "fun" in English. Someone who says "fun" in English says the exact same thing for this name in Chinese, just with a 'J'."
Nope, the '-un' in Mandarin Chinese is pronounced vastly differently from that in English. To borrow from the International Phonetic Alphabet, Chinese Pinyin 'Jun' (tones undifferentiated) is [tɕyn], while English 'fun' is [fʌn]. There is a world of difference between the vowels (and I'm not starting on the consonants because that was never the bone of contention). An English speaker without prior Mandarin Chinese background attempting to calque their pronunciation of the name on that of the word "fun" would most likely find themselves saying [ʤʌn], which isn't at all right, not when confronted with a Mandarin Chinese speaker.

In my earlier comment I said that "There's no rhyme with 'gun' in English, pinyin 'gun' doesn't rhyme with pinyin 'Jun', and 'fun' doesn't exist as a pinyin combination. Unless you're referring to a dialectal pronunciation, I don't see how your statement can be true, and Chinese was one of my mother tongues." Now -- thanks to your pointing it out -- I see how that can be a possible source of confusion. Let me try to clear that up:
In English, 'fun' and 'gun' rhyme (in IPA, they're transcribed as [fʌn] and [gʌn] respectively).
In Mandarin Chinese, we have no such thing because
+ Pinyin 'Jun' (tones undifferentiated) is [tɕyn], approximatable by this site's pronunciation guide as 'zhuyn' ([ʒyn])
+ Pinyin 'gun' (again, tones undifferentiated) is [ku̯ən] (can't find any possible approximations for this one in this site's pronunciation guide, though)
+ 'fun' does not exist in Pinyin.
I brought in these examples to try to drive home the point that the pronunciation of the Chinese syllable isn't calquable on English.

"In Mandarin Chinese, a common name is "JUN", but in Korean it is "JOON". They are the same character, which makes things even worse."
I have nothing to say to the contrary here. A shared romanisation is indeed cause for confusion, as is a shared spelling. That's why I was pushing for a split, as happened with "Jean (1)" and "Jean (2)" -- in both cases, the pairs of names look alike and have the same origin/basis, but in the case of the "Jean" names, one is used predominantly by French speakers and is pronounced closer to "John", while the other sounds like "gene" and is used primarily by English speakers. It's the same with the "Jun" names -- they likely have the same bases and the same meanings (and if they don't, that's even worse) one is used by Chinese speakers, the other by Korean speakers, and both have their own pronunciations.

"My parents told me in Cantonese it is not like that at all, it's actually "Gwun", but still isn't that the same just with a diff first sound? 'G' instead of 'J'."
I can't tell you about that since I don't know Cantonese. I'm going to be bold and work based on the assumption that this example of yours is correct, in which case you see that even in Cantonese, the pronunciation of the word/name is not at all calquable on English.

"Trust me, I spoke to people born and raised in both China and Korea and they admit this difference is confusing but obvious. Some of them didn't even know it 'til I pointed it out."
... I'm ethnically Chinese and raised on Mandarin Chinese and English, and my homeland's been swept by quite a few waves of K-fever (basically, mass infatuation over all things Korean), so I know I can trust you on this particular statement.

"Also in Korean they do this with a lot of other names. One Korean-born student told me, "Well yes, that is fair to say. It depends on which pronunciation system you're using. In syllables, 'J-U' is supposed to be 'Joo'" Not 'Juh', so yeah. / Yun is Yoon, Mun is Moon (this is my name, which means "culture" doing the same thing with an 'M'), and so forth."

I'm not sure what you're trying to say with this. You seem to be making the point, once again, that the Chinese and Korean romanisation systems (and hence their pronunciations of the same romanisation) are different. That's undeniable. See further up in this comment for what I'm trying to say about what that should mean for this name's entry.
Yes, the PINYIN is different. The reason I said that I don't care about it is because you seem to be very concerned with how they spell it out and use it. But actually, if it's not 100%, it's still CLOSER to the English pronunciation of "fun". It's like another Chinese name, Yu. I remember people were saying "It's not 'You' even though it looks like it. It has a deeper sound at the end."

I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not.

It is the same meaning. It is usually used as a male name which means "handsome".

My parents don't care about it much either, because it wasn't widely used when they were growing up. Nowadays things are different. In SEA countries, no one used Pinyin to Romanize.

I'm not saying that's bad, I agree it's not a good thing since you can't easily write Chinese on electronics, but they just didn't. They knew their characters.
@EstherTester I'm not really sure what's the argument between you and @seraphine_eternal but I'm pretty sure you need to learn PINYIN to understand how Chinese pronunciation works. I'm Chinese, been learning Chinese since young so I suppose if you really wish to clarify the correct pronunciation for some words, I can always help.

Jun, in Chinese, is not pronounced as 'Fun' with a 'J'. Well we all know 'Fun' sounds like 'Farn' without the 'R', but Jun is not 'Jarn' without the 'R'.

Confused? Okay, Jun is not pronounced as 'Joon' in Chinese. I know it has varying pronunciations in other languages like Japanese and Korean, but I'm 100% sure there is not a single word in Chinese that sounds like 'Joon'.

Fun sounds like 'Fan' in Chinese, which is commonly known as Rice. Jun however, sounds more like Jün in PINYIN, with the two dots above the 'u'. If you're not sure about PINYIN, the closest word I can think of in English that sounds like Jun is Jean. It's really complicated because English and Chinese pronunciations are very very different.

I can assure you that Jun is not pronounced as 'Joon'! :)
"Yes, the PINYIN is different."
In terms of the number of language systems that pronounce the syllable one way or another, I agree, it is the outlier. At the same time, you can't ignore it because it's being used by a sizeable number of people.

"The reason I said that I don't care about it is because you seem to be very concerned with how they spell it out and use it. But actually, if it's not 100%, it's still CLOSER to the English pronunciation of 'fun'. It's like another Chinese name, Yu. I remember people were saying 'It's not 'You' even though it looks like it. It has a deeper sound at the end.'"
Anything that contains an ü in its Pinyin isn't that obvious to non-Sinophones.* That I understand. The reason why I'm insisting so vehemently is because, when you say "it's pronounced as / like [...]", people take that to be the standard; in this case, what you first proposed isn't a standard pronunciation in Chinese. It would be better to differentiate original-language pronunciations from pronunciations found in societies where said original languages aren't spoken (as main languages, whether official or national). I honestly hope we're clear on that. That's been my main thrust, always.
* "A deeper sound"? Interesting perception. It merits an investigation.

"My parents don't care about it much either, because it wasn't widely used when they were growing up. Nowadays things are different."
Your folks didn't care much about the Pinyin because they didn't grow up with it. That is fine. But it now is something that's used by a large chunk of the world's population. (Thank you for acknowledging that.)
Please also note that this site is available on the Internet, which is international by definition. Given that it's one of the best name sites that exist out there, it's pretty authoritative. So, as much as possible, it shouldn't contain mistakes.
"In SEA no one used Pinyin to romanise", yes, because the sinograms were adopted by the Southeast Asian countries, with pronunciations / phonetic evolutions proper to those societies. I don't expect them to give up their languages entirely.

"I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not."
... I don't have that intention. Which of my remarks did you take as sarcasm-tinged ones?

"It is the same meaning. It is usually used as a male name which means 'handsome'."
Yes, in general (we already have an exception on the name's main entry). The same goes with the example of the two "Jean"s. I'm not sure if you understood me correctly on that one.

"I'm not saying that's bad, I agree it's not a good thing since you can't easily write Chinese on electronics, but they just didn't. They knew their characters."
I'm not sure what your last point's about. Could you clarify or elaborate, please? I know you were talking about your parents...
Pronounced "JOON", like the month.
Jun Kazama is a female character on the video game, "Tekken".
Jun was also a popular boy's name in the past.
Jun Matsumoto is a Japanese idol, singer, actor and radio host. He is a member of Japanese boy band Arashi. He has won GQ Japan's Man Of The Year Award under the singer/actor category for his work in the drama.
Jun is the name of a female bounty hunter in the Nickelodeon cartoon, Avatar: The Last Airbender.
I was looking through Chinese names for a story I'm writing and a character's name is Jun-Heng "Supreme, constant." I think this reflects her personality very well, as she thinks that as the mistress of both a minister to Duke Xiao of Qin *and* one of Qin's finest warriors, her high place in society is cemented.
I would love to know a guy named Jun. The name sounds so awesome, I think it really fits a handsome guy.
Also used in Japan for girls. Jun (純) Togawa is a Japanese singer who was in Yapoos and Guernica as well as making solo albums. She has a fantastic squeaky high-pitched voice.
r is a pretty popular form of "Jun", it means handsome.
I once knew a guy named Jun, he was from South Korea. I always thought it was a really cool name, and I think it's very strong and handsome.
I've actually only heard of boys using this name. Except he was a Korean and this was the shortened version of his name which was Jun Hyeok Yu. I like it for a boy, the name for a girl seems too. Classy? (in a bad way)
Jun (君) is very common in both male and female Chinese names.

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