Aztec and Toltec Mythology Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the Toltecs, Aztecs and other related peoples.
gender
usage
Chalchiuhtlicue f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl, from chālchiuhtli "jade, precious stone" and cuēitl "skirt". This was the name of the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
Chimalma f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "shield hand" in Nahuatl, derived from chīmalli "shield" and māitl "hand". This was the name of an Aztec goddess who was the mother of Quetzalcoatl and Xolotl.
Coatlicue f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "snake skirt" in Nahuatl, derived from cōātl "snake" and cuēitl "skirt". This was the name of the Aztec creator goddess who gave birth to the stars (considered deities). She was also the mother of Huitzilopochtli, who protected his mother when her children attacked her.
Coyolxauhqui f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "painted with bells" in Nahuatl, derived from coyolli "bell" and xuah "face painting". This was the name of an Aztec moon goddess, the daughter of Coatlicue. She was killed by her brother Huitzilopochtli after she led an attack on their mother.
Ehecatl m Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "wind" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec wind god.
Huitzilopochtli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "left side of the hummingbird" or "southern hummingbird" in Nahuatl, derived from huitzilin "hummingbird" and ōpōchtli "left, south". In Aztec mythology he was the god of the sun and war. He was a patron deity of the city of Tenochtitlan (at the site of modern Mexico City).
Metztli f & m Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "moon" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec god (or goddess) of the moon.
Mictlantecuhtli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "lord of Mictlan" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the skeletal ruler of Mictlan, the realm of the dead, with his wife Mictecacihuatl.
Quetzalcoatl m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and cōātl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
Tezcatlipoca m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "smoking mirror" in Nahuatl, derived from tezcatl "mirror" and pōctli "smoke". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was one of the chief gods, associated with the night sky, winds, war, and the north. Like his rival Quetzalcoatl, he was a creator god.
Tlaloc m Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Possibly from Nahuatl tlālloh meaning "covered with earth", derived from tlālli meaning "earth, land, soil". This was the name of the Aztec god of rain and fertility, the husband of Chalchiuhtlicue.
Tonatiuh m Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "sun" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec sun god.
Xochipilli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl, from xōchitl "flower" and pilli "noble child, prince". Xochipilli was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
Xochiquetzal f Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Derived from Nahuatl xōchitl "flower" and quetzalli "feather". This was the name of the Aztec goddess of love, flowers and the earth, the twin sister of Xochipilli.
Xolotl m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Meaning uncertain, of Nahuatl origin, possibly meaning "servant" or "corn stalk". In Aztec mythology Xolotl was a monstrous dog-headed god who guided the dead to Mictlan. He was also associated with lightning, fire and the evening star. He was the twin brother of Quetzalcoatl.