Comments for the name Solange

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Comments for SOLANGE:

I've read that Solange comes from sollemnis, a Latin word that means "solemn." I've also read that it means "rare jewel," but I do not know the origin of that meaning.
-- sarahj  12/5/2005
This is the name of singer Beyonce Knowles' sister. I don't know whether that counts as a "famous bearer" or not.
-- kiwifruit  6/28/2006
Well she's famous and she's bearing it, so what's there to be unsure about?
-- Anonymous User  1/6/2008
I have also seen this name described as having the meaning "angel of the sun", I suppose from shortening the French word for sun, soleil, and pairing it with the word for angel, ange. Although I'm sure it's incorrect, I must say I prefer the definition "angel of the sun" over "solemn". But, that's just me!
-- Star Sister  10/26/2006
I think it's pretty.
-- Taydbug112  6/4/2007
In French pronounced sohl-aw(n)j. I agree with the previous poster who commented about the presence of the French word "ange" or "angel" in this name and would like to add that the word "sol" in French means "alone" or "only, depending on the context it's used. So, Solange could mean "Solitary Angel" alternatively.
-- leananshae  12/17/2007
A very pretty name, but I would never use a saint name. Or a martyr name. Or a prophet name, or anything religious, as long as it's avoidable. Besides, the fact that this is Beyoncé Knowles' sister's name has ruined this name, don't you think? I can't stand her music, and I don't expect her sister to be much less annoying as a person either.
-- slight night shiver  5/7/2008
The name is beautiful, but attributing the meaning to the Latin "sollemnis" sounds too far-fetched for me. I'd readily accept the meaning proposed by Star Sister; it's even lovelier that way. Besides, I never knew there was a St Solange until now - this just goes to show how rare it is as a saint name, and I think that, were I to use it, it wouldn't really be sacrilegious. I mean, just look at the number of bearers of "Mary", "Maria", etc.

To leananshae: I believe the French word for "alone" or "only" is "seul(e)"?
-- seraphine_eternal  6/16/2008
This is a beautiful name, but it also sounds like "salon", and everyone thinks of Beyoncé's sister. I love both Beyoncé and her sister, but who wants their name associated with a celebrity?
-- bananarama  8/9/2008
This name is so pretty! Oh, and bananarama, I DO! Oh, wait, I do!
-- LilSingstarEeyore  1/13/2009
Solange was the name of the character played by Lidia Brondi in the Brazilian TV soap opera "Vale tudo".
-- alberto  4/11/2009
I was a little surprised at the etymology of the name. I also assumed that it had to do with some 'angel' of sorts. And Seraphine_eternal is right: alone in French IS "seul(e)" - the pronunciation between the two would sound very close, however, to an English speaker.

Solange is also the name of the cat in the comic strip "9 Chickweed Lane", and the name of a prostitute, not seen but talked of by Rex Harrison's character in the little known but cute movie "The Reluctant Debutante".
-- ChocoPanda  4/26/2009
Solange is pronounced sol-AWnZH in French. The _an_ is nasalised. [noted -ed]
-- shotgun_wedding  3/12/2010
What a nice name! One of the few French names I really like, I chose this to be my name in French class this year. And the meaning (according to my teacher) is gorgeous, "angel of the sun"!
-- EchoSketcher  8/27/2010
Terribly sorry, but the word sol is never, ever, ever the French word for 'alone'. Ever. The word for 'lone, solitary' is 'seul' -not- 'sol' - in French, 'sol' means 'soil' or, occasionally, 'floor'. If we're going by some strange blending of words, which isn't incredibly rare but is still a bit unusual in French, one would get 'Sol' + 'ange' - "Angel of the floor", "Angel of the soil"? Not exactly great origins. Are we overlooking the fact that 'sol' and 'ange' are both masculine nouns? A little bit contra-intuitive for a female name, but I guess such things do happen.

I also find the etymology of 'Sol' = 'sun' as suspect. Okay, so Sol(eil) + ange... not impossible, but definitely unusual. In many contracted names, the original name was the full sense - for example, Marilou was originally taken from Marie Louise. The contraction of Solange is unusual unless there was originally the idea of Soleil-Ange or Soleil Ange as a name, which, as any Francophone would tell you, is almost hysterically absurd and stupid sounding.

Sol is indeed a poetic and folkloric name for the sun in many language, ultimately taken from the latinate name for the sun. If the case, the meaning "Angel of Sol" may be acceptable, but I am highly skeptical. Beyond highly skeptical.

I'm terribly sorry, guys, but I find the given origin, through a series of linguistic mutations, to be infinitely more plausible than pretty folk etymologies which fall apart when examined linguistically. I hate to be pretentious. Sol(eil) as an origin is indeed possible, but -highly- unlikely. If of purely French origin with no outside sources, there is -no way, shape or form- in which it can mean 'solitary angel'... ever. Sol does -not- equal 'seul'.
-- Amara L.  8/25/2011
I know this sounds immature, but it always reminds me of blamanche.
-- Hushpuppy  5/31/2012
There are French words that are derived from Latin whose forms changed in French and included the letters "ange", or variations of that. These letters hadn't been included in the original Latin word.
For example:

(Latin -> French)
Granea -> grange
Vindemia -> vendange
Extranea -> étrange
Somnium -> songe
Diluvium -> déluge‎

As you can see, it's common for some letter combinations to become "nge" in French. The Latin name Sollemnia changing to French Solange is quite natural and would fit this pattern. As one of the previous commenters has stated, the name Solange is not related to the words for "angel" or "solitary". That's not the true etymology.
-- Anonymous User  7/27/2012
The name Solange was given to 70 baby girls born in the US in 2012.
-- Oohvintage  7/18/2013
In france, it's an old fashioned name, very uncommon on kids nowadays. It might come back into fashion, though.
-- luxsword  4/28/2014
Solange Robillard is the name of Scarlett O'Hara's maternal grandmother in Gone With the Wind. She died before her daughter Ellen married Gerald O'Hara, but she is mentioned as: "a very great lady" and "a dainty, cold, high-nosed Frenchwoman, who spared neither her children nor her servants their just punishment for any infringement of decorum." Later on she is mentioned as being a Frenchwoman whose parents had fled the 1791 Revolution in Haiti. She had "slanting dark eyes", "inky lashes" and black hair. She was married to Pierre Robillard "a soldier of Napoleon" and lived in Savannah, Georgia as a member of "one of the wealthiest and proudest families on the Coast".
-- CNicole  8/10/2014

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