Venus
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I like Latin names. I think it's interesting that Venus means love. Just not for my child.
-- Tbird  6/26/2005
Venus Williams has this name.
-- miraclegirl80  9/17/2005
A famous painting of Venus is "The Birth of Venus" by Sandro Botticelli.
-- Anonymous User  4/26/2006
A famous song is "Oh, Venus" sung by Frankie Avalon circa the mid or late 50's.
-- Anonymous User  6/4/2006
Remember, this name rhymes with the male organ.
-- Anonymous User  6/28/2006
Venus is pronounced like VEE-nus, which does not rhyme with anything ending in EE-nis.
-- jc  7/24/2006
Where the heck did you people get the pronunciation 'ven - is' from? IT IS 'VEE - NUS' I REPEAT, 'VEE - NUS'! Therefore it doesn't rhyme with anything unsuitable! The only down side is the association with the razors.
-- Anonymous User  4/10/2010
If people would pronounce the name ve-noos and not veenas like the original pronunciation it would be a nice name!
-- Anonymous User  7/31/2006
I like Veneris. I read Latin for a while in school and that is a form of Venus, that become something I can't remember, like Venus's or something. I just like that as a name.
-- honungspinglan  1/7/2007
Venus as a name sounds somewhat beautiful in some way, especially after hearing the song "Oh Venus" (yes so what I think it's a nice song! It was sung by Frankie Avalon whose voice probably doesn't rival some of the boy singers of today). It's easy to imagine stars around and a pretty lady with golden-red hair and gorgeous, slinky clothes holding a red rose in her hand. It goes with the impression of the "Birth of Venus" painting. It fits. The same I'd say of Aphrodite, though I think Venus sounds more starry (and starry-eyed) than roses and gardens like Aphrodite. When I think of Aphrodite I imagine the sea shells (both really but in a different way lol) and roses. Ironic, very ironic because I once read that Aphrodite is associated more with the sky and stars and Venus with roses and gardens. Maybe it's just the way the name sounds or something.
-- Loni_maryrose  6/3/2007
In Spanish this is pronounced VEH-noos. I think it sounds nice, but I'd never think of naming anyone this. I've heard of a tennis player named Venus and of a few songs with the name. Then there's the razor-blades too.
-- Anonymous User  6/5/2007
Venus was also the goddess of beauty, and in a classic sense you can say a very beautiful woman is a Venus. So just imagine you name this a girl and she turns out a dog.
-- Anonymous User  11/17/2007
Venus was the daughter of Zeus and the mother of Cupid and the wife of Hermes.
-- ianlam  11/30/2007
To the person who said Venus was Zeus' daughter. That's not true. First of all you've combined Greek and Roman mythology. Zeus is Greek and Venus is Roman. Secondly, Aphrodite is more commonly thought to be the daughter of Uranus, so Venus would be the daughter of Caelus, the Roman equivalant of Uranus.
You were right about Cupid (Eros) being the son of Venus (Aphrodite).
Again, Venus is Roman and Hermes is Greek. The Roman equivalant of Hermes is Mercury. Though some versions claim Aphrodite and Hermes had children together, she was not married to him. She was married to Hephaestus (Vulcan).
-- renee06  11/26/2008
Actually, ianlam is correct in terms of Homer's epic "The Iliad," which states that Aphrodite (Venus) is the daughter of Zeus and his consort Dione. Look it up for yourself. The other popular theory is that Venus was born when Uranus's castrated genitalia were thrown into the sea, and she was subsequently born from the foam/waves that resulted. Therefore Uranus could only be her father in the loosest sense of the term, but in the Iliad, Zeus was clearly her father.
-- Anonymous User  3/21/2013
Also a popular women's razor brand.
-- Anonymous User  3/23/2008
This is a planet name, and the name has connotations to sexuality because of the whole goddess of sexual desire thing, so the name is likely to draw attention to itself, and thus the bearer. Shy girls would probably not enjoy having this name, let alone asexual women. The name just sounds weird on a person. Plus, it rhymes with 'penis', so you can imagine the torment if the other kids decide not to like a girl named Venus.
-- slight night shiver  5/12/2008
Venus is not a good name in my opinion, because it rhymes with "that special organ in males" and just having your child's name meaning sexual desire is just wrong.
-- Anonymous User  6/28/2008
Actually, the name is quite common in Hong Kong, a bit like being called Irene in the UK.
-- reina  2/13/2009
Who'd name a kid after a sexual desire goddess?!
-- Kerules  4/6/2009
I like the sound of this, it's certainly a guilty pleasure.
-- vomiting  6/19/2009
When I think of this name, I think of Sailor Venus/Minako Aino, a character from the popular Magical Girl series Sailor Moon. That, and the fact that Venus is the alias of a certain porn star. Either way, this name is a huge guilty pleasure.
-- Anonymous User  6/22/2009
I always think of the razor, and I also think of the annoying Venus Williams. The fact that it rhymes with "penis" will cause so much bullying it won't even be funny.
-- bananarama  7/27/2009
This is not a famous bearer, but Venus is a song by Shocking Blue.
-- CharlieRob  8/2/2009
Venus also pronounced "VEH-nuws".
-- MaggieSimpson  11/3/2009
The armless marble sculpture "Venus de Milo" depicts the Roman goddess of love and beauty Venus (or Greek equivalent Aphrodite) and is one of the most widely known and universally recognized statues since the 19th century, for which the 6 ft. 8 in. statue is displayed in the Musée du Louvre in Paris.
-- moon_swooning  12/11/2010
Leave it to the goddess.
-- xsai  6/22/2011
Name of the Day: June 22nd, 2011.
-- AndrewJKD  6/23/2011
I can think of other goddesses of love and fertility: Áine from Ireland; Branwen from Wales; Freyja from ancient Scandinavia; Ziva among ancient Slavs; Nanaya in ancient Sumeria; Inanna in Mesopotamia; Rati from Hindu lore; Xochiquetzal among the Aztecs; and Oshun of Yoruba religion, among others.
-- gaelruadh19  6/22/2012
I think it`s great that at least this planet name is used, cause people find it strange to name people plantery names like mars, jupiter, but Venus is a common planet name for a person since it's not that strange :)
-- Anonymous User  2/4/2013
Name of the Day: June 22, 2013.
-- dwayne1996  6/22/2013
The name Venus was given to 73 baby girls born in the US in 2012.
-- Oohvintage  7/18/2013
Venus is one of my absolute favorite goddesses, who I love so much. This is one of those names that I'd consider using (possibly), although I'm a bit uncertain if I really like the sound of it enough to use it if I ever got the chance.
-- StarMoon  2/10/2014
Considering that the verb for love in Latin is amare, and nouns in Romantic languages are usually close to their verbs, I really doubt that Venus means "love, sexual desire." It's simply a connotation because Venus and Aphrodite are one in the same.
-- EkiAku  4/11/2014
●Venera is Azerbaijani, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian
●Vieniera is Belarusian
●Venuše is Czech
●Venuso is Esperanto
●Veenus is Estonian
●Benus is Filipino
●Vénus is French
●Vénusz is Hungarian
●Véineas is Irish
●Venere is Italian
●Wenus is Polish
●Vênus is Portuguese
●Venuša is Slovak
●Venüs is Turkish.
-- Anonymous User  5/5/2014
Venus Isabelle Palermo, better known as VenusAngelic, is a Swiss-born YouTube personality, known for her doll-like appearance and fashion sense.
-- Anonymous User  5/3/2015
I think Venus is quite a cool name for a girl. :)
-- Anonymous User  8/19/2015
Actually, the ancient people of the Etruscan era worshiped a Deity with a name of Vene (or, similar word structure formation). She was known as the goddess of herbs and plants, emanating the beauty of the rose and myrtle plants; thus, this gorgeous Goddess was associated with "Earth" and the knowledge thereof. She was portrayed as a herbalist from her VAST knowledge of the "green Earth"; hence, why modern correspondences with the modern Roman Deity of Venus are always the color of green, the beauty of the rose and myrtle, as well as the seashell, as the representation of water is always depicted for Goddesses of whom generate life, as the original intention of this Goddess. Later in time, the ancient Etruscan Deity, Vene, or closely formed name, came to be associated with witchcraft as her worshipers were known to make "love potions" in her honor. Many of the Etruscan people asked many wise women with the knowledge of such herbs for healing to make "the love of their life appear and whisk them away to an enchanted life" through "love potions"; therefore, such women who had a vast knowledge of herbs were known as a Vica, which is another variation of the word "Wicca", or "Witch", as this word WAS associated with "healers", or "herb healers", etc. However, just as "Witches" were persecuted in later times, they were also persecuted during the Etruscan and Roman times, also! So, the roots of the Goddess Venus or Aphrodite have MANY meanings; especially, associating "love", "beauty", "lifeblood", "worship", "vein", and later, when correlated with "Witches", the word association became maleficient, such as with words correlating to "venom", or "poisoning by herbs". All these aspects are later incorporated into the known Deity of Venus. Now, the Etruscan civilization was WAY before the Greek, so a lot of confusion surrounds the understanding among many who only learn the straight history of the Greek and Roman pantheon of gods and goddesses of mythology. Now, since Vene became associated with "love potions" & "witches", many people of the ROMAN era, during the transition of the end of the Etruscan Empire to the Roman, I believe, associated this Deity with "venom", or poison, as the people of the early Roman era, and late Etruscan era used many words with the Latin root of Vene, to mean "one who poisons", etc. However, ironically, the Latin root word means "life", or versions, thereof, and we also see this root word used for words such as "vein", or "lifeblood", or "venerate", which means "to be worshiped". So, the obvious changes during the civilizations and the many variations of the meaning of the Deities to those of that era are as vast as they are today, especially regarding the interpretation of religion or the meaning of "God". Nothing is as black and white as we believe. We must remember, these ancient people weren't mindless, stupid drones who all followed the same structure of belief just because it was part of their culture. They had PLENTY of debates regarding the meaning of these Deities; and, they were numerous, vast interpretations, just as their interpretations today! :)
-- SelenAsterRae  4/2/2016
Venus was given to 70 girls in America in 2015.
-- cutenose  6/11/2016

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