Names Categorized "indigenous American chiefs"

This is a list of names in which the categories include indigenous American chiefs.
gender
usage
Ahtahkakoop m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᐊᑖᐦᑲᑯᐦᑊ (Atâhkakohp) meaning "star blanket", derived from ᐊᑖᕁ (atâhk) "star" and ᐊᑯᐦᑊ (akohp) "blanket". This was the name of an early 19th-century chief of a Plains Cree people.
Ahuludegi m Indigenous American, Cherokee
Means "he throws away the drum" from Cherokee ᎠᎱᎵ (ahuli) "drum" and ᎤᏕᎦ (udega) "throw". This was the name of a 19th-century Cherokee chief, also known as John Jolly.
Baishan m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "knife" in Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Tchihende Apache.
Catahecassa m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee warrior and chief.
Cochise m Indigenous American, Apache (Anglicized)
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Apache go-chizh "his firewood" or go-chįh "his nose". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
Cowessess m Indigenous American, Ojibwe (Anglicized)
From an Ojibwe or Cree name recorded as Kiwisance, said to mean "little child", possibly related to Ojibwe gwiiwizens meaning "boy" or Cree ᐊᐋᐧᓯᐢ (awâsis) meaning "child". This was the name of a late 19th-century chief of a mixed band of Plains Cree and Saulteaux people.
Dasoda-hae m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "he just sits there" in Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Tchihende Apache, also known by the Spanish nickname Mangas Coloradas meaning "red sleeves".
Degataga m Indigenous American, Cherokee
Derived from Cherokee ᎦᏙᎦ (gadoga) meaning "standing". This was the name of a Cherokee chief, also called Stand Watie (1806-1871).
Gian-nah-tah m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "always ready" in Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Mescalero Apache.
Hokolesqua m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "cornstalk" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief.
Isapo-Muxika m Indigenous American, Siksika
From Siksika Issapóómahksika meaning "big Crow foot", from Issapó "Crow (tribe)", ómahk "big" and ika "foot". This was the name of a Blackfoot chief, known as Crowfoot (1830-1890).
Kaneonuskatew m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
Means "he who walks on four claws" in Cree, derived from ᓀᐅᐧ (newo) "four" and the root ᐊᐢᑲᓯᕀ (askasiy) "claw". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan, also known as George Gordon.
Kawacatoose m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᑲᐋᐧᐦᑲᑐᐢ (Kawâhkatos) meaning "poor man, weak from hunger". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan.
Kisecawchuck m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᑮᓯᑳᐊᐧᒑᕁ (Kîsikâawcâhk) meaning "day star", derived from ᑮᓯᑳᐤ (kîsikâw) "day" and ᐊᑖᕁ (atâhk) "star". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan.
Mahpiya m & f Indigenous American, Sioux
From Dakota or Lakota maȟpíya meaning "cloud, sky". This is the first part of the names of the Dakota chief Mahpiya Wicasta (1780-1863), known as Cloud Man, and the Lakota chiefs Mahpiya Luta (1822-1909), known as Red Cloud, and Mahpiya Iyapato (1838-1905), known as Touch the Clouds.
Maquinna m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
From Nuu-chah-nulth Mukwina, possibly meaning "possessor of pebbles". This was the name of a late 18th-century chief of the Mowachaht people.
Mistawasis m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
Means "big child" in Cree, derived from ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ (mistahi) "big, great" and ᐊᐋᐧᓯᐢ (awâsis) "child". This was the name of a prominent 19th-century Cree chief.
Muscowequan m Indigenous American, Ojibwe (Anglicized)
From Ojibwe Maskawigwan meaning "hard quill", derived from mashkawaa "hard" and gaaway "quill". This was the name of a 19th-century Saulteaux chief.
Naiche m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "mischief maker" in Apache. This name was borne by a 19th-century Chiricahua Apache chief, the son of Cochise.
Nonhelema f Indigenous American, Shawnee
Possibly means "not a man" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief, the sister of Hokolesqua.
Odeserundiye m Indigenous American, Mohawk
Possibly means "lightning has struck" in Mohawk. This was the name of an 18th-century Mohawk chief, also called John Deseronto.
Onangwatgo m Indigenous American, Oneida (Anglicized)
Means "big medicine" in Oneida, from onúhkwaht "medicine" and the suffix -koó "big, great". This was the name of a chief of the Oneida people, also named Cornelius Hill (1834-1907).
Pitikwahanapiwiyin m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᐲᐦᑐᑲᐦᐊᓇᐱᐏᔨᐣ (Pîhtokahanapiwiyin) meaning "sits at the buffalo pound", derived from ᐲᐦᑐᑲᐦᐋᐣ (pîhtokahân) "buffalo pound, buffalo corral" and ᐊᐱᐤ (apiw) "sit". This was the name of a Plains Cree chief, also known as Poundmaker (1842-1886).
Potsʉnakwahipʉ m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "male bison back" in Comanche, derived from potsʉ "male bison" and kwahi "back (body part)". This name was borne by a 19th-century war chief of the Penateka Comanche, also called Buffalo Hump.
Quanah m Indigenous American, Comanche (Anglicized)
From Comanche kwana meaning "fragrant, smelly". Quanah Parker (1845-1911) was a 19th-century chief of the Kwahadi Comanche.
Skenandoa m Indigenous American, Oneida (Anglicized)
Possibly from Oneida oskanutú meaning "deer". This was the name of an 18th-century Oneida chief. According to some sources the Shenandoah River in Virginia was named after him, though the river seems to have borne this name from before his birth. It is possible that he was named after the river, or that the similarity in spellings is a coincidence.
Tatanka m Indigenous American, Sioux (Anglicized)
From Lakota tȟatȟáŋka meaning "male bison". This was the first part of the name of the Lakota holy man and chief Tatanka Iyotake (1831-1890), usually translated into English as Sitting Bull.
Tecumseh m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "panther passing across" in Shawnee. This name was borne by the Shawnee leader Tecumseh (1768-1813), who resisted American expansion along with his brother the spiritual leader Tenskwatawa.
Tessouat m Indigenous American, Algonquin
Meaning unknown. This was the name of several 17th-century Algonquin chiefs.
Tosahwi m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "white knife" in Comanche, derived from tosa- "white" and wihi "knife". This name was borne by a 19th-century Penateka Comanche chief.
Tʉhʉyakwahipʉ m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "horse back" in Comanche, derived from tʉhʉya "horse" and kwahi "back (body part)". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Nokoni Comanche.
Wahunsenacawh m Indigenous American, Powhatan
Meaning unknown. This name was borne by a 17th-century chief of the Powhatan people. He was also known as Powhatan, as a result of confusion between his name and his birthplace.
Wapasha m Indigenous American, Sioux
Means "red leaf" in Dakota, from waȟpé "leaf" and šá "red". This was the name of several Dakota chiefs.
Wawatam m Indigenous American, Ojibwe
Possibly means "little goose" in Ojibwe. This was the name of an 18th-century chief of the Ottawa people.
Wickaninnish m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in Nuu-chah-nulth. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
Wilma f German, Dutch, English, Swedish
Short form of Wilhelmina. German settlers introduced it to America in the 19th century.
Yonaguska m Indigenous American, Cherokee
Means "drowning bear" from Cherokee ᏲᎾ (yona) "bear" and possibly ᎫᏂᏍᎧ (guniska) "drown". This was the name of a 19th-century Eastern Cherokee chief.