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[Opinions] Opinion and pronunciation of Liselotte
Like this very much as I have been reading about the winter queen and Liselotte is her granddaughter.
Real name is Elizabeth Charlotte.How would Liselotte be pronounced in English speaking tongue?
Would it be strange name for British girl ?
Tags:  pronunciation
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I love the name Liselotte! It's gorgeous. I think it would be pronounced lees-eh-lot.
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As a German native speaker, for me it's Lee-ze-LOTT-teh spelled Li-e-selotte, similar to Siegfried, Wilfried, Friedrich, Frieda & Friederike.In English it would become to Lee-ze-LOTT with silent letter/silent vocal -e- ending, I suppose. Personally, also with NN's Lilo or Loki, I can imagine a British girl very well here.
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I say LEE-zel-LOT-tuh, similarnto the German way. Have heard people saying “Lees-LOT,” but that’s always seemed “incorrect” to me.
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It's pretty common in Sweden, just not popular at the moment. In Sweden it's pronounced LEE-se-lot. I think it's a bit too sugar sweet.
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I would say most people if they knew anything about names would say Liesl-•lot, and if they had a basic.knowledge of German names it would be Liesl-lotter. That being said, I have a friend who is just Liesl, which is a fairly familiar name to englihs speakers due to the Sound of Music, and she constantly gets called “Lisa” or “Lizzle” or “Lizzie” and most people don’t know if it’s a sssss s or a zzzzz s. So a British Lieslotte might have some issues with explaining pronunciation.
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I would expect English people to use the German pronunciation, or as close to it as they can get: lee-zuh-lo-tuh.
I wouldn't expect to find it used in English-speaking societies unless there was a very good reason: a grandmother named Elizabeth Charlotte, or - like you - an interest in history.Where I live, Afrikaans-speaking people typically learn German at school as a third language, and use both Elizabeth (various spellings) and Charlotte to name their daughters, but I've never seen a Liselotte locally. And other blended names are widely used, so that's not the issue. Perhaps it's just inconveniently long.
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I'm American and I'd say lee-səl-OTT (ott as in otter). I don't think it would be strange on a British girl.
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Ooh, I’ve been thinking about Liselotte, because of BBC’s ‘Versailles’. I’d say LEE-sa-lot, and I think it’s pretty straight forward once you hear it out loud/get used to it. I’m currently thinking about it as a middle, because I just can’t make any middles fit, but I think it would make such a great first! It might be unusual here (I’m a Brit too), but not impossible.
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Ah the same lady! Born in palatine (germany) but goes to France (her uncle marries a French duchess) and she becomes second wife of Philippe. I need to watch Versailles
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I thought so! You should give it a watch. It’s good, does not hold back at all haha.
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I don't know the English way of saying it, I'm Dutch and I say lee-ze-LAW-tə.I think it's nice enough. It's classy to me and I think it has potential. It's not really my style, but I appreciate seeing it on other people's kids.
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