Egyptian Mythology Names

These names occur in the mythologies of the Ancient Egyptians.
gender
usage
AMMON m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Yamanu (see AMON).
AMON m Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Ἄμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian jmn (reconstructed as Yamanu) meaning "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
AMON-RA m Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
Combination of the names of the gods AMON and RA. During the later Middle Kingdom the attributes of these two deities were merged.
ANAPA m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of ANUBIS.
ANOUBIS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Anapa (see ANUBIS).
ANUBIS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ἄνουβις (Anoubis), the Greek form of Egyptian jnpw (reconstructed as Anapa and other forms), which coincided with a word meaning "royal child, prince". However, it might alternatively be derived from the root jnp meaning "to decay". Anubis was the Egyptian god who led the dead to the underworld. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a jackal. The Greeks equated him with their god Hermes.
APIS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ḥjpw (reconstructed as Hapi), which is of unknown meaning. In Egyptian mythology he was a sacred bull, sometimes considered a son of Hathor. He was later fused with Osiris resulting in the figure of Serapis.
ASAR m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of OSIRIS.
ATON m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jtn meaning "solar disk". Aton was an Egyptian god of the sun, depicted as a solar disk with long rays extending downwards. The worship of Aton was especially extensive during the reign of the pharaoh Akhenaton, who proclaimed Aton was the only god.
ATUM m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jtm or tmw, derived from tm meaning "completion, totality". This was the name of an Egyptian creator god. He was first prominently worshipped in Heliopolis during the Old Kingdom.
BAST f Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian bꜣstt, which was possibly derived from bꜣs meaning "(ointment) jar". In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BASTET f Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian bꜣstjt, a variant of BAST. This form of the name, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
DJEHUTI m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of THOTH.
HAPI m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of APIS.
HATHOR f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ḥwt-ḥrw (reconstructed as Hut-Heru) meaning "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian ḥwt "house" combined with the god HORUS. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
HERU m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of HORUS.
HOROS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Heru (see HORUS).
HORUS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ὧρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian ḥrw (reconstructed as Heru and other forms) possibly from ḥr "above, over" or ḥrj "distant". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HUT-HERU f Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of HATHOR.
IAH m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jꜥḥ meaning "moon". In Egyptian mythology this was the name of a god of the moon, later identified with Thoth.
ISET f Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of ISIS.
ISIS f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
KHNUM m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian ẖnmw (reconstructed as Khenmu or Khnemu), derived from ẖnm meaning "to unite". This was the name of an early Egyptian god associated with fertility, water and the Nile. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a ram, sometimes with a potter's wheel.
NEBET-HUT f Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of NEPHTHYS.
NEITH f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian nt, possibly from nt "water" or nrw "fear, dread". This was the name of an early Egyptian goddess of weaving, hunting and war. Her character may have some correspondences with the goddesses Tanith, Anat or Athena.
NEPHTHYS f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian nbt-ḥwt (reconstructed as Nebet-Hut) meaning "lady of the house", derived from nbt "lady" and ḥwt "house". This was the name of an Egyptian goddess associated with the air, death and mourning. She was wife of the desert god Seth.
ONUPHRIUS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Greek Ὀνούφριος (Onouphrios), derived from Egyptian wnn-nfr meaning "he who is good, he who is happy". This was an epithet of the god Osiris. It was later used by an Egyptian saint and hermit from the 4th or 5th century.
OSIRIS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of the Egyptian wsjr (reconstructed as Asar, Usir and other forms), which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to wsr "mighty" or jrt "eye". In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.
PTAH m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian ptḥ meaning "opener, creator". Ptah was an Egyptian god associated with creation and the arts.
RA m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian rꜥ meaning "sun" or "day". Ra was an important Egyptian sun god originally worshipped in Heliopolis in Lower Egypt. He was usually depicted as a man with the head of a falcon crowned with a solar disc. In later times his attributes were often merged with those of other deities, such as Amon, Atum and Horus.
RE m Egyptian Mythology
Variant spelling of RA.
SERAPIS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
From a compound of Asar, the Egyptian form of OSIRIS, and APIS, the sacred bull of the Egyptians. This was the name of a syncretic Greco-Egyptian god, apparently promoted by Ptolemy I Soter in the 3rd-century BC in an attempt to unite the native Egyptians and the Greeks in the Ptolemaic Kingdom.
SETH (2) m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
From Σήθ (Seth), the Greek form of Egyptian swtẖ or stẖ (reconstructed as Sutekh), which is of unknown meaning. Seth was the Egyptian god of chaos and the desert, the slayer of Osiris. Osiris's son Horus eventually defeats Seth and has him banished to the desert.
SUTEKH m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of SETH (2).
THOTH m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ḏḥwtj (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
YAMANU m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of AMON.